Postpartum Care

RN – Postpartum – PRN Job in Washington, DC at Johns Hopkins Medicine

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Job DetailsAPPLYREFER A FRIENDBACK

RN – Postpartum – PRN

Requisition #: 190063
Location: Sibley Memorial Hospital,Washington,DC 20001

Category: Nursing

Work Shift: Rotating Shift
Work Week: Casual (less than 20)
Weekend Work Required: Yes
Date Posted: July 18, 2019Johns Hopkins Health System employs more than 20,000 people annually. Upon joining Johns Hopkins Health System, you become part of a diverse organization dedicated to its patients, their families, and the community we serve, as well as to our employees. Career opportunities are available in academic and community hospital settings, home care services, physician practices, international affiliate locations and in the health insurance industry. If you share in our vision, mission and values and also have exceptional customer service and technical skills, we invite you to join those who are leaders and innovators in the healthcare field.Leads a team of multi-skilled patient care providers in the delivery of outcome oriented,safe, therapeutic and cost effective care in the Maternal/Newborn Unit. Identifies patient needs professionalknowledge and medical plan of care. Establishes individualized outcome measures foreach patient's care. Delegates interventions critical thinking skills and aknowledge of the competencies of each team member. Coordinates care to maximizedesirable outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost effective utilization of availablepersonnel and resources. Serves as a representative of the hospital and as a clinical role model in all interactions with patients, family, visitors, physicians, and other staffmemberRNII is a registered nurse in the PACE(Professional Advancement/Clinical Excellence) program hired with at least one-year current experience in an acute-care setting or who has advanced to an RNII from an RN I level. Leads a team of multi-skilled patient care providers in the delivery of outcome oriented, safe, therapeutic and cost effective care. Identifies patient needs professional knowledge and medical plan of care. Establishes individualized outcome measures for each patient's care. Delegates interventions critical thinking skills and a knowledge of the competencies of each team member. Coordinates care to maximize desirable outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost effective utilization of available personnel and resources. Serves as a representative of the hospital and as a clinical role model in all interactions with patients, family, visitors, physicians, and other staff members.

Minimum Education and Experience:

1. Licensure as a Registered Nurse in the District of Columbia.2. Graduation from an accredited program for Registered Nurses.3. Minimum of 12 contact hours per year through an accredited provider.4. Minimum of two-year current experience in an acute care setting.

Schedule:

PRN. One weekend per month requirement.

Sibley Memorial Hospital provides a smoke-free workplace.

Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employers. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, age, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, and or any other status protected by federal, state, or local law.

Source: https://www.ziprecruiter.com/c/Johns-Hopkins-Medicine/Job/RN-Postpartum-PRN/-in-Washington,DC?jid=DO725d52d73f784d20cc389529003e0e4c

Johns Hopkins researchers ID genetic predictors of postpartum depression found

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered specific chemical alterations in two genes that when present during pregnancy reliably predict whether a woman will develop postpartum depression.

The epigenetic modifications, which alter the way genes function without changing the underlying DNA sequence, can apparently be detected in the blood of pregnant women during any trimester, potentially providing a simple way to foretell depression in the weeks after giving birth, and an opportunity to intervene before symptoms become debilitating.

The findings of the small study involving 52 pregnant women are described online in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

“Postpartum depression can be harmful to both mother and child,” says study leader Zachary Kaminsky, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “But we don't have a reliable way to screen for the condition before it causes harm, and a test this could be that way.”

It is not clear what causes postpartum depression, a condition marked by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, exhaustion, and anxiety that begins within four weeks of childbirth and can last for up to a year.

An estimated 10 to 18 percent of all new mothers develop the condition, and the rate rises to 30 to 35 percent among women with previously diagnosed mood disorders.

Scientists long believed that the symptoms were related to the large drop-off in the mother's estrogen levels following childbirth, but studies have shown that depressed and nondepressed women have similar estrogen levels.

By studying mice, the Johns Hopkins researchers suspected that estrogen induced epigenetic changes in cells in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that governs mood.

Kaminsky and his team then created a complicated statistical model to find the candidate genes most ly undergoing those epigenetic changes, which could be potential predictors for postpartum depression.

That process resulted in the identification of two genes, known as TTC9B and HP1BP3, about which little is known save for their involvement in hippocampal activity.

Kaminsky says that the genes in question may have something to do with the creation of new cells in the hippocampus and the ability of the brain to reorganize and adapt in the face of new environments—two elements important in mood. In some ways, he says, estrogen can behave an antidepressant, so that when inhibited, it adversely affects mood.

The researchers later confirmed their findings in humans by looking for epigenetic changes to thousands of genes in blood samples from 52 pregnant women with mood disorders. Jennifer L. Payne, director of the Johns Hopkins Women's Mood Disorders Center, collected the blood samples. The women were followed during and after pregnancy to see who developed postpartum depression.

The researchers noticed that women who developed postpartum depression exhibited stronger epigenetic changes in those genes that are most responsive to estrogen, suggesting that these women are more sensitive to the hormone's effects. Specifically, two genes were most highly correlated with the development of postpartum depression. TTC9B and HP1BP3 predicted with 85 percent certainty which women became ill.

“We were pretty surprised by how well the genes were correlated with postpartum depression,” Kaminsky says. “With more research, this could prove to be a powerful tool.”

Kaminsky says that the next step in research would be to collect blood samples from a larger group of pregnant women and follow them for a longer period of time. He also says it would be useful to examine whether the same epigenetic changes are present in the offspring of women who develop postpartum depression.

Evidence suggests that early identification and treatment of postpartum depression can limit or prevent debilitating effects. Alerting women to the condition's risk factors—as well as determining whether they have a previous history of the disorder, other mental illness, and unusual stress—is key to preventing long-term problems.

Research also shows, Kaminsky says, that postpartum depression affects not only the health and safety of the mother but also her child's mental, physical, and behavioral health.

Kaminsky says that if his preliminary work pans out, he hopes a blood test for the epigenetic biomarkers could be added to the battery of tests women undergo during pregnancy, and inform decisions about the use of antidepressants during pregnancy. There are concerns, he says, about the effects of these drugs on the fetus, and their use must be weighed against the potentially debilitating consequences to both the mother and child of forgoing them.

“If you knew you were ly to develop postpartum depression, your decisions about managing your care could be made more clearly,” he says.

The research was funded in part by the Solomon R. & Rebecca D. Baker Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the NARSAD 2010 Young Investigator Award.

The investigators have filed a provisional patent application for DNA methylation at biomarker loci related to postpartum depression.

Jerry Guintivano of Johns Hopkins' Mood Disorders Center also contributed to this research.

Posted in Health

epigenetics, psychiatry, depression, women's health

Source: https://hub.jhu.edu/gazette/2013/june/news-postpartum-depression-genetic-predictors/

Genetic predictors of postpartum depression uncovered

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered specific chemical alterations in two genes that, when present during pregnancy, reliably predict whether a woman will develop postpartum depression.

The epigenetic modifications, which alter the way genes function without changing the underlying DNA sequence, can apparently be detected in the blood of pregnant women during any trimester, potentially providing a simple way to foretell depression in the weeks after giving birth, and an opportunity to intervene before symptoms become debilitating.

The findings of the small study involving 52 pregnant women are described online in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

“Postpartum depression can be harmful to both mother and child,” says study leader Zachary Kaminsky, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “But we don't have a reliable way to screen for the condition before it causes harm, and a test this could be that way.”

It is not clear what causes postpartum depression, a condition marked by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, exhaustion and anxiety that begins within four weeks of childbirth and can last weeks, several months or up to a year.

An estimated 10 to 18 percent of all new mothers develop the condition, and the rate rises to 30 to 35 percent among women with previously diagnosed mood disorders.

Scientists long believed the symptoms were related to the large drop-off in the mother's estrogen levels following childbirth, but studies have shown that both depressed and nondepressed women have similar estrogen levels.

By studying mice, the Johns Hopkins researchers suspected that estrogen induced epigenetic changes in cells in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that governs mood.

Kaminsky and his team then created a complicated statistical model to find the candidate genes most ly undergoing those epigenetic changes, which could be potential predictors for postpartum depression.

That process resulted in the identification of two genes, known as TTC9B and HP1BP3, about which little is known save for their involvement in hippocampal activity.

Kaminsky says the genes in question may have something to do with the creation of new cells in the hippocampus and the ability of the brain to reorganize and adapt in the face of new environments — two elements important in mood. In some ways, he says, estrogen can behave an antidepressant, so that when inhibited, it adversely affects mood.

The researchers later confirmed their findings in humans by looking for epigenetic changes to thousands of genes in blood samples from 52 pregnant women with mood disorders. Jennifer L. Payne, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Women's Mood Disorders Center, collected the blood samples. The women were followed both during and after pregnancy to see who developed postpartum depression.

The researchers noticed that women who developed postpartum depression exhibited stronger epigenetic changes in those genes that are most responsive to estrogen, suggesting that these women are more sensitive to the hormone's effects. Specifically, two genes were most highly correlated with the development of postpartum depression. TTC9B and HP1BP3 predicted with 85 percent certainty which women became ill.

“We were pretty surprised by how well the genes were correlated with postpartum depression,” Kaminsky says. “With more research, this could prove to be a powerful tool.”

Kaminsky says the next step in research would be to collect blood samples from a larger group of pregnant women and follow them for a longer period of time. He also says it would be useful to examine whether the same epigenetic changes are present in the offspring of women who develop postpartum depression.

Evidence suggests that early identification and treatment of postpartum depression can limit or prevent debilitating effects. Alerting women to the condition's risk factors — as well as determining whether they have a previous history of the disorder, other mental illness and unusual stress — is key to preventing long-term problems.

Research also shows, Kaminsky says, that postpartum depression not only affects the health and safety of the mother, but also her child's mental, physical and behavioral health.

Kaminsky says that if his preliminary work pans out, he hopes a blood test for the epigenetic biomarkers could be added to the battery of tests women undergo during pregnancy, and inform decisions about the use of antidepressants during pregnancy. There are concerns, he says, about the effects of these drugs on the fetus and their use must be weighed against the potentially debilitating consequences to both the mother and child of forgoing them.

“If you knew you were ly to develop postpartum depression, your decisions about managing your care could be made more clearly,” he says.

The research was funded in part by the Solomon R. & Rebecca D. Baker Foundation, the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Mental Health (MH093967 and K23 MH074799-01A2) and the NARSAD 2010 Young Investigator Award.

The investigators have filed a provisional patent application for DNA methylation at biomarker loci related to postpartum depression.

Along with Payne and Kaminsky, Jerry Guintivano of Johns Hopkins' Mood Disorders Center also contributed to this research.

Story Source:

Materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130521105256.htm

Postpartum Mood Disorders: What New Moms Need to Know

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Linkedin Pinterest Women's Health Managing Mood and Stress Women's Health Conditions Mood Disorders

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Bringing a baby home is supposed to be one of the most joyful times in a woman’s life, but for many, the experience isn’t always so rosy.

In fact, most new moms will get the baby blues, where hormonal changes cause anxiety, crying and restlessness that goes away within the first two weeks after giving birth. Also called postpartum blues, the baby blues are actually a mild — and temporary — form of depression that goes away once your hormones level out.

For other women, it’s not just about a mild case of the blues. As many as one in five new moms have their time with a new baby marked by postpartum depression, a more serious but highly treatable condition. 

Lauren Osborne, M.D., assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center, explains what women need to know about baby blues, postpartum depression and postpartum psychosis.

Baby Blues or Postpartum Depression?

Almost every new mother — up to 85 percent of them — will experience the postpartum blues. You may feel happy one minute and overwhelmed and crying the next. 

“No mother is happy all the time,” says Osborne. “It’s normal to be frustrated and even need to put the baby down sometimes.”

If symptoms are severe or last for more than two weeks, a new mom should be concerned about a postpartum mood disorder, such as postpartum depression. Women who had anxiety or depression before giving birth are at higher risk. The signs and symptoms of postpartum depression include:

  • Anxiety
  • Sadness
  • Anger and irritability
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Intrusive thoughts (which may include thoughts of harming the baby)

“People tend to think of depression as sadness, but that’s not always the case,” Osborne says. “Particularly in the postpartum period, there’s a lot of anxiety and irritability, plus lack of sleep, which is a huge risk factor for postpartum depression.” 

And while it’s not necessarily a symptom of depression to be sleeping poorly with a newborn, it can make postpartum depression symptoms worse. 

There’s good news on the research front, however. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center identified epigenetic biomarkers — differences in the activity of certain genes — that predict who’s most ly at risk for postpartum depression.

Empower yourself to make effective health decisions. Attend A Woman's Journey, a conference held throughout the year at locations in Maryland and Florida, where Johns Hopkins physicians discuss the latest health news for women.

While postpartum depression is relatively common, postpartum psychosis is an extremely rare disorder, affecting just 0.1 percent of new mothers. That number rises to 30 percent in mothers who have bipolar disorder. Symptoms of postpartum psychosis include:

  • Confusion and cognitive impairment that may come and go 
  • Coming in and consciousness
  • Extremely disorganized behavior
  • Hallucinations or delusions

It’s important not to ignore these symptoms, even if you have no history of mood disorder. “Postpartum psychosis can occur in women with no previous history of psychiatric illness,” says Osborne.

She stresses that postpartum psychosis is a psychiatric emergency requiring immediate medical attention because it carries a high rate of suicide and harm to the baby.

Treating Postpartum Mood Disorders

Being diagnosed with a postpartum mood disorder can put a cloud over what is supposed to be a happy time.

But it doesn’t have to — the most important things to know about postpartum mood disorders are that they are highly treatable and not something a new mother needs to feel ashamed about.

Even in the most severe cases of postpartum psychosis, one recent study showed that 98 percent of patients got better with treatment. 

Treatment for postpartum depression includes antidepressant medications, which have good evidence of safety in breast-feeding. The gold-standard treatment for postpartum psychosis includes both lithium (a mood stabilizer) and an antipsychotic medication. With these medications, it is important for a doctor to monitor the baby to ensure that breast-feeding is safe. 

Preventing Postpartum Mood Disorders

Osborne says not enough studies exist that look at preventing postpartum mood disorders, although they are becoming more common.

For example, one study showed that mothers who learned soothing and sleep-promoting methods for their babies had lower rates of postpartum depression.

Another study showed that taking an antidepressant right away in the postpartum period could help prevent mood episodes in women with a history of postpartum depression. 

Sleep is another key area of postpartum care to help prevent mood disorders. 

“If I see a woman who’s at risk for postpartum depression, I have her come in with her partner so we can make a proactive plan for sleep,” she says. Proper sleep can make the difference in preventing a mood disorder. Getting at least four hours of sleep may mean taking shifts for feeding or having the partner do everything but nursing.

She says the main message she’d mothers to hear is that women shouldn’t be afraid to seek help. 

“We need to break down the stigma of mental illness, especially for new mothers, because it does respond to treatment,” she says.

Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/postpartum-mood-disorders-what-new-moms-need-to-know

Perinatal Mood Disorders Resources

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

When you have a baby many things can change, your hormones are off balance, you have a new person who depends on you for everything, and you’re not getting much sleep.  All of these things can lead to Postpartum Depression, Postpartum Anxiety, and other Postpartum Mood Disorders.  Having proper resources can help.  For families in the Baltimore area there are options and resources.

Online: Postpartum Support International has weekly online support groups. They are on Tuesdays and Fridays in English and in Spanish. You can look at the schedule and choose to register with this link http://www.postpartum.net/psi-online-support-meetings/ .

BALTIMORE CITY:

Desirée L. Israel:  Postpartum Support Group meets at The Womb Room (915 W36th St 2nd floor rear) the1st and 3rd Tuesday 4-5:30. Postpartum Recovery For therapy, she accepts medical assistance through an agency. Contact her to discuss 410-513-9611

Sinai Hospital support group: meets every Wednesday from 1:30-3pm at Sinai Hospital (2401 West Belvedere Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21215). The group meets in Resource Room on Ground Floor. Babies are welcome. Please contact Sara Daly, LCSW-C (410-601-7832) with any questions. website

Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorder Clinic: 550 North Broadway, Suite 308, Baltimore, MD 21205  410-502-7449, email: WMDC@jhmi.edu web

Hazel Laing LCSW-C 410-271-0267 takes insurance see website for list

Rachel Beck 410-433-8027 600 Wyndurst Ave Suite 308 Baltimore, MD 21210 no insurance though will help to get reimbursed info@beck.com web

BALTIMORE COUNTY:

Sara Nett, Psy.D 6600 York Rd, Suite 202, Baltimore, MD 21212 443-470- 3124 Email: Contact@DrSaraNett.com Also has a monthly group which meets one Saturday at 9:30.  Please contact Sara for registration.  web

Sarah Chisholm-Stockard, Ph.D (443) 797-2530 744 Dulaney Valley Rd., Suite 8, Towson, MD 21204 She is in-network for Cigna, Johns Hopkins EHP, and US Family Health Plan (USFHP). For all other plans, she will complete insurance paperwork so client can reimbursement for out-of network benefits. web

Tara Simpson, Psy.D. (410) 657-8755 660 Kenilworth Dr. Suite 101Towson, Maryland 21204 no insurance will help to get reimbursed. web

Alison L. Miller, Psy.D. 443-330-2146 2324 West Joppa Road, Suite 420 Lutherville, MD 21093 no insurance but will help to get reimbursed web

Gretchen Forbes, LCMFT 22 West Padonia Rd., Suite C-353, Timonium, MD 21093 (443) 465-0545 info@gretchenforbes.com web

Emily Souder, LCSW-C offering in-home and teletherapy options www.nestingspacetherapy.com (will be on maternity leave spring 2017)

Julie Bindeman, Psy.D. Integrative Therapy of Greater Washington (301) 246-0980 5818 B Hubbard Drive Rockville, Maryland 20852 Web

Emily Griffin, MSW, LICSW, LCSW-C Happy Parents Happy Babies (202) 213-1868 Offering in home options. Website

Source: https://katylinda.com/perinatal-mood-disorders-resources/

ICTR in the News: Low Levels of ‘Anti-Anxiety’ Hormone Linked to Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

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  • ICTR in the News: Low Levels of ‘Anti-Anxiety’ Hormone Linked to Postpartum Depression

Posted by: Crystal Williams on: March 15, 2017 | Print This Page

The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Lauren M. Osborne, M.D., assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Effect measured in women already diagnosed with mood disorders

Credit: iStock

In a small-scale study of women with previously diagnosed mood disorders, Johns Hopkins researchers report that lower levels of the hormone allopregnanolone in the second trimester of pregnancy were associated with an increased chance of developing postpartum depression in women already known to be at risk for the disorder.

In a report on the study, published online on March 7 in Psychoneuroendocrinology, the researchers say the findings could lead to diagnostic markers and preventive strategies for the condition, which strikes an estimated 15 to 20 percent of American women who give birth.

The researchers caution that theirs was an observational study in women already diagnosed with a mood disorder and/or taking antidepressants or mood stabilizers, and does not establish cause and effect between the  progesterone metabolite and postpartum depression. But it does, they say, add to evidence that hormonal disruptions during pregnancy point to opportunities for intervention.

Postpartum depression affects early bonding between the mother and child. Untreated, it has potentially devastating and even lethal consequences for both.

Infants of women with the disorder may be neglected and have trouble eating, sleeping and developing normally, and an estimated 20 percent of postpartum maternal deaths are thought to be due to suicide, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Many earlier studies haven’t shown postpartum depression to be tied to actual levels of pregnancy hormones, but rather to an individual’s vulnerability to fluctuations in these hormones, and they didn’t identify any concrete way to tell whether a woman would develop postpartum depression,” says Lauren M. Osborne, M.D.

, assistant director of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Mood Disorders Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“For our study, we looked at a high-risk population of women already diagnosed with mood disorders and asked what might be making them more susceptible.”

For the study, 60 pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 45 were recruited by investigators at study sites at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. About 70 percent were white and 21.

5 percent were African-American. All women had been previously diagnosed with a mood disorder, such as major depression or bipolar disorder.

Almost a third had been previously hospitalized due to complications from their mood disorder, and 73 percent had more than one mental illness.

During the study, 76 percent of the participants used psychiatric medications, including antidepressants or mood stabilizers, and about 75 percent of the participants were depressed at some point during the investigation, either during the pregnancy or shortly thereafter.

During the second trimester (about 20 weeks pregnant) and the third trimester (about 34 weeks pregnant), each participant took a mood test and gave 40 milliliters of blood.

Forty participants participated in the second-trimester data collection, and 19 of these women, or 47.5 percent, developed postpartum depression at one or three months postpartum.

The participants were assessed and diagnosed by a clinician using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, version IV for a major depressive episode.

Of the 58 women who participated in the third-trimester data collection, 25 of those women, or 43.1 percent, developed postpartum depression. Thirty-eight women participated in both trimester data collections.

Using the blood samples, the researchers measured the blood levels of progesterone and allopregnanolone, a byproduct made from the breakdown of progesterone and known for its calming, anti-anxiety effects.

The researchers found no relationship between progesterone levels in the second or third trimesters and the lihood of developing postpartum depression. They also found no link between the third-trimester levels of allopregnanolone and postpartum depression. However, they did notice a link between postpartum depression and diminished levels of allopregnanolone levels in the second trimester.

For example, according to the study data, a woman with an allopregnanolone level of 7.5 nanograms per milliliter had a 1.5 percent chance of developing postpartum depression. At half that level of hormone (about 3.

75 nanograms per milliliter), a mother had a 33 percent lihood of developing the disorder.

For every additional nanogram per milliliter increase in allopregnanolone, the risk of developing postpartum depression dropped by 63 percent.

“Every woman has high levels of certain hormones, including allopregnanolone, at the end of pregnancy, so we decided to look earlier in the pregnancy to see if we could tease apart small differences in hormone levels that might more accurately predict postpartum depression later,” says Osborne. She says that many earlier studies on postpartum depression focused on a less ill population, often excluding women whose symptoms were serious enough to warrant psychiatric medication — making it difficult to detect trends in those women most at risk.

Because the study data suggest that higher levels of allopregnanolone in the second trimester seem to protect against postpartum depression, Osborne says in the future, her group hopes to study whether allopregnanolone can be used in women at risk to prevent postpartum depression. She says Johns Hopkins is one of several institutions currently participating in a clinical trial led by Sage Therapeutics that is looking at allopregnanolone as a treatment for postpartum depression.

She also cautions that additional and larger studies are needed to determine whether women without mood disorders show the same patterns of allopregnanolone levels linked to postpartum depression risk.

If those future studies confirm a similar impact, Osborne says, then tests for low levels of allopregnanolone in the second trimester could be used as a biomarker to predict those mothers who are at risk of developing postpartum depression.

Osborne and her colleagues previously showed and replicated in Neuropsychopharmacology in 2016 that epigenetic modifications to two genes could be used as biomarkers to predict postpartum depression; these modifications target genes that work with estrogen receptors and are sensitive to hormones. These biomarkers were already about 80 percent effective at predicting postpartum depression, and Osborne hopes to examine whether combining allopregnanolone levels with the epigenetic biomarkers may improve the effectiveness of the tests to predict postpartum depression.

Of note and seemingly contradictory, she says, many of the participants in the study developed postpartum depression while on antidepressants or mood stabilizers.

The researchers say that the medication dosages weren’t prescribed by the study group and were monitored by the participant’s primary care physician, psychiatrist or obstetrician instead.

“We believe that many, if not most, women who become pregnant are undertreated for their depression because many physicians believe that smaller doses of antidepressants are safer for the baby, but we don’t have any evidence that this is true,” says Osborne.

“If the medication dose is too low and the mother relapses into depression during pregnancy or the postpartum period, then the baby will be exposed to both the drugs and the mother’s illness.”

Osborne and her team are currently analyzing the medication doses used by women in this study to determine whether those given adequate doses of antidepressants were less ly to develop symptoms in pregnancy or in postpartum.

Only 15 percent of women with postpartum depression are estimated to ever receive professional treatment, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Many physicians don’t screen for it, and there is a stigma for mothers.

A mother who asks for help may be seen as incapable of handling her situation as a mother, or may be criticized by friends or family for taking a medication during or shortly after pregnancy.

Additional authors on the study include Fiona Gispen, Abanti Sanyal, Gayane Yenokyan, Samantha Meilman and Jennifer L. Payne of The Johns Hopkins University.

The study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (K23 MH074799).

FOR THE MEDIA

Source: https://ictr.johnshopkins.edu/news_announce/ictr-in-the-news-low-levels-of-anti-anxiety-hormone-linked-to-postpartum-depression/

Research Information

Postpartum Care | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Research and clinical trials are essential for the advance of medicine. The effectiveness of each new breakthrough can only be assessed by putting them into practice with individuals affected by the disease.

For those who care about vasculitis and discovering new ways to identify, diagnose, and treat these diseases, there are many ways to support the advancement of research. Volunteer participation in clinical trials is one way to help progress knowledge about the various types of vasculitis.

As a volunteer, your participation can help potentially new, successful treatments become available to others who understand living with vasculitis as you do. For certain non-medication based studies, a volunteer may be any individual who is willing to participate.

Volunteers can be spouses, friends and family members who wish to make a difference in vasculitis research.

Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Trials

From the definition of a clinical trial to information and questions that are good to ask your doctor before participating in a trial, this section address many of the common questions that arise when deciding to join in supporting vasculitis research.

What is a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a type of research study. Clinical trials test a new treatment and compare it to the available treatment (the usual way doctors treat a certain health condition or disease).

For example, a clinical trial might study how well a new medicine helps people with cancer or if certain foods help people stay healthy. The Food and Drug Administration requires clinical trials before a new medication can be approved.

Sometimes it is necessary to compare an experimental treatment with a placebo (inactive treatment) when no standard treatment exists.

FDA Consumer magazine published this article “Inside Clinical Trials Testing Medical Products in People” which may assist in understand the purpose, process and procedure of clinical trials from the Food and Drug Administrative’s perspective. 

Why should I take part in a clinical trial?

Because the trials are investigations designed to learn more about a specific disease or treatment, personal benefit cannot be guaranteed. The benefits of taking part in a clinical trial depend on the study you join. The benefits also depend on your assigned study group. Here are some possible benefits you might get from taking part in a clinical trial. You may:

  • get free health exams;
  • learn more about your health;
  • take a more active role in your own health care;
  • have your health watched closely;
  • receive some medications at no cost to you; and help answer research questions that may mean better health for people in the future.

What are the risks of taking part in a clinical trial?

There are risks to you when you take part in a clinical trial. The study doctors and coordinators will watch you carefully for any changes in your health. You are always free to leave the study. The risks will vary depending on the kind of trial you join. Here are some possible risks.

  • You may have side effects (health problems) from taking a new medicine or getting a new procedure that is being tested. There may be side effects that are unexpected. Usually you will need to give blood samples. Some people find that process uncomfortable.
  • The visits for the clinical trial may be frequent and time consuming.

The therapy you receive may not be effective or you may be assigned to a placebo group

How do I know if I have been given all the information I need about taking part in a clinical trial?

When beginning any study the doctor, or investigator, must ask approval from an Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB is a committee of doctors and other medical personnel that have no ties to the study. The IRB makes sure the study is as safe as possible and that the “informed consent” explains all of the important information to the patient.

Before people join a clinical trial, they go through something called the “informed consent process”.

This process means that you are given written information that tells you about the purpose of the study; risks and benefits of being in the study; and what will happen to you in the study. You will be given an informed consent form, which you will need to read over very carefully.

Take the form home and share it with family members, friends, and your primary care doctor. Once you have read the form, ask questions about words or procedures that you don’t understand.

Another part of the informed consent process is that you can ask questions about the study at any time. It is your right to have all the information you need to make your decision about whether or not to take part in a clinical trial. Don’t let anyone pressure you into taking part in a clinical trial. The choice is yours.

What if I decide that I don’t want to be a part of the study, even though the study has already started?

That’s okay. You can change your mind and leave the study at any time. Remember that being a part of a clinical trial is always your choice. Your relationship with your doctor will not change because you decide to leave the study. Your care will not be affected in any way.

Who takes part in clinical trials?

Many different people take part in clinical trials. People who take part in clinical trials are volunteers who meet eligibility criteria for the study. Eligibility criteria are requirements that someone must meet to be a part of the study.

Some examples of eligibility criteria are having a certain disease such as Wegener’s Granulomatosis (WG); not showing improvement on standard WG medications; being a certain age; or being in good health.

These criteria help make sure that the study answers the right research question.

Is it safe to participate in a clinical trial if trying to conceive a child or pregnant?

Check with your doctor or the study coordinator to find out if it is safe to participate in a particular study if you are trying to conceive, if you are pregnant or postpartum.

If the trial is assessing medications, there is often concern about how medicines used in a study could affect a pregnancy regardless of being male or female.

The informed consent form should tell you if any of the medicines in the study could affect a pregnancy.

For women, if you are postpartum and breast feeding, check with your doctor to make sure it is okay to breast feed your baby while you are taking part in a clinical trial. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about safety.

How can I find out about clinical trials or other research studies at the Johns Hopkins Vasculitis Center ?

If you would more information about one of our research activities or if you would to be a participant, please contact the Johns Hopkins Vasculitis Center.

Source: https://www.hopkinsvasculitis.org/vasculitis-research/