Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones

Child Life Specialist Job in Baltimore, MD at Johns Hopkins Medicine

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Job DetailsAPPLYREFER A FRIENDBACK

Child Life Specialist

Requisition #: 185975
Location: Johns Hopkins Hospital/Johns Hopkins Health System,Baltimore,MD 21201

Category: Non-Clinical Professional

Work Shift: Day Shift
Work Week: Full Time (40 hours)
Weekend Work Required: No
Date Posted: July 10, 2019Johns Hopkins Health System employs more than 20,000 people annually. Upon joining Johns Hopkins Health System, you become part of a diverse organization dedicated to its patients, their families, and the community we serve, as well as to our employees. Career opportunities are available in academic and community hospital settings, home care services, physician practices, international affiliate locations and in the health insurance industry. If you share in our vision, mission and values and also have exceptional customer service and technical skills, we invite you to join those who are leaders and innovators in the healthcare field.

Position Summary:

Provides psychosocially and developmentally based assessment and support to both patients and their families. Plans and provides emotionally and developmentally appropriate play and other experiences to promote effective coping with health care experiences and continued cognitive and emotional growth. Enhances quality of patient care through participation, documentation and communication with other members of the health care team. Teaches, supervises and evaluates work of volunteers and Child Life practicum students. Serves as a resource and advocate on child development issues.

Knowledge:

A professional level of knowledge of theoretical rationale of child development theories, educational theory, and caregiving practices.Knowledge and skill in growth and development, therapeutic play, psychological preparation, provision of coping strategies and support during medical events.Knowledge of medical terminology and its implications at a level generally acquired through nine to twelve months on-the-job training.Knowledge of the Child Life Council Code of Ethics.Familiarity with hospital/departmental policies and procedures normally acquired through one to three months on-the-job experience.

Education:

A Bachelor's Degree in Child Development, Human Development, Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Child Life, or related field, and completion of a Child Life internship of, minimum 480 hours preferred 600 hours.

Work Experience:

One year job experience or a Master's degree with some work experience preferred.

Shift:

Day, Full Time (40 hours)8:00 am-4:30 pmExempt

Work Location:

JHH, 600 N. Wolfe Street

Skills:

Ability to (1) assess patient/family psychosocial and developmental strengths and risks, (2) plan goals, (3) implement interventions, and (4) evaluate effectiveness of assessment, plans and interventions.Ability to facilitate a variety of group and individual play and activities that promote development, self-expression, and mastery.Ability to provide constant attention to patients and families, determining their needs, monitoring their behavior and providing necessary support up to eighty percent of work day.Documentation and written communication skills, usually acquired through internship and nine to twelve months on-the-job training.Effective verbal communication and public speaking skills.Basic supervisory skills.Strong multi-cultural skills to interact effectively with patients, families, and staff.Strong time management and organizational skills.

Required Licensure, Certification:

Certification at the professional level through the Child Life Council must be acquired within the first year of employment. Employee must maintain certification during employment. If employee fails to recertify according to Child Life Council standards, employee must take and pass the certification exam the next time it is offered.

Working Conditions:

Works in patient care areas where there are no physical discomforts due to dust, dirt, temperature and the .Physical ability required to walk and stand for up to eighty percent of work time and lifting or pushing of objects weighing up to thirty pounds for up to fifteen percent of work time.Johns Hopkins is a Smoke – Free campus.Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are drug-free workplace employers.Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action employers. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, age, national origin, mental or physical disability, genetic information, veteran status, or any other status protected by federal, state, or local law.

Source: https://www.ziprecruiter.com/c/Johns-Hopkins-Medicine/Job/Child-Life-Specialist/-in-Baltimore,MD?jid=DO8c50f4d9954bb14375eee18b641921e8

Child Day Care Assistant job in Baltimore at Johns Hopkins Medicine

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine Baltimore, MD

978

Child Day Care Assistant

jobs

318

19

jobs at

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Closed jobs

Johns Hopkins Medicine is a governing structure for the University’s School of Medicine and the health system, coordinating their research, teaching, patient care, and related enterprises.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital opened in 1889, followed four years later by the university’s School of Medicine, revolutionizing medical practice, teaching, and research in the United States.

The hospital is now part of the Johns Hopkins Health System, which includes two other acute-care hospitals and additional integrated health-care delivery components, with a network of primary and specialty care practices throughout Maryland, outpatient care, long-term care, and home care.

The Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876 as America’s first research university, founded for the express purpose of expanding knowledge and putting that knowledge to work for the good of humanity.

Two Interconnected Institutions: Over the years, the University and Hospital have grown, and—sometimes jointly, sometimes separately—they have created affiliated organizations. The Johns Hopkins Institutions is a collective name for the University and the Johns Hopkins Health System. The Johns Hopkins University includes nine academic and research divisions, and numerous centers, institutes, and affiliated entities. Johns Hopkins Medicine is a governing structure for the University’s School of Medicine and the health system, coordinating their research, teaching, patient care, and related enterprises.

Johns Hopkins Health System employs more than 20,000 people annually. Upon joining Johns Hopkins Health System, you become part of a diverse organization dedicated to its patients, their families, and the community we serve, as well as to our employees.

Career opportunities are available in academic and community hospital settings, home care services, physician practices, international affiliate locations and in the health insurance industry.

If you share in our vision, mission and values and also have exceptional customer service and technical skills, we invite you to join those who are leaders and innovators in the healthcare field.

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

Child Development Center

Job Duties: Provides assistance to the Child Care Teacher in the delivery of a thematic curriculum. Conducts activities that are developmentally appropriate for the assigned children, Provide care for all children 2-5 years of age. Interacts with adults over the age of 18 years.

Part Time (20 hours)

2:30pm-8:00pm

Work requires a high school level of educational development and up to one year of basic technical training in childcare.

Current 90 hour Certificate and valid CPR certification (Healthcare Provider) required. MSDE Credential preferred. Must have taken Communications class or college coursework (9 hrs), Basic Health and Safety course (3 hrs), ADA course, Medication course and CPR.

No experience required

Work areas may be noisy and crowded

Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action employers.

All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, age, national origin, mental or physical disability, genetic information, veteran status, or any other status protected by federal, state, or local law.

Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are drug-free workplace employers.

Application currently closed

Sign up new jobs posted daily

This job was posted on Sun Feb 10 2019 and expired on Thu Feb 14 2019.

Tasks

  • Maintain a safe play environment.
  • Observe and monitor children's play activities.
  • Communicate with children's parents or guardians about daily activities, behaviors, and related issues.
  • Support children's emotional and social development, encouraging understanding of others and positive self-concepts.
  • Care for children in institutional setting, such as group homes, nursery schools, private businesses, or schools for the handicapped.
  • Sanitize toys and play equipment.
  • Dress children and change diapers.
  • Keep records on individual children, including daily observations and information about activities, meals served, and medications administered.
  • Identify signs of emotional or developmental problems in children and bring them to parents' or guardians' attention.
  • Instruct children in health and personal habits, such as eating, resting, and toilet habits.
  • Organize and store toys and materials to ensure order in activity areas.
  • Perform general administrative tasks, such as taking attendance, editing internal paperwork, and making phone calls.
  • Create developmentally appropriate lesson plans.
  • Perform housekeeping duties, such as laundry, cleaning, dish washing, and changing of linens.
  • Read to children and teach them simple painting, drawing, handicrafts, and songs.
  • Assist in preparing food and serving meals and refreshments to children.
  • Discipline children and recommend or initiate other measures to control behavior, such as caring for own clothing and picking up toys and books.
  • Regulate children's rest periods.
  • Organize and participate in recreational activities and outings, such as games and field trips.
  • Sterilize bottles and prepare formulas.
  • Help children with homework and school work.
  • Provide care for mentally disturbed, delinquent, or handicapped children.
  • Operate in-house day-care centers within businesses.
  • Perform general personnel functions, such as supervision, training, and scheduling.
  • Accompany children to and from school, on outings, and to medical appointments.

Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service – Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Psychology – Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Education and Training – Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • English Language – Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Public Safety and Security – Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.

Johns Hopkins Medicine is a governing structure for the University’s School of Medicine and the health system, coordinating their research, teaching, patient care, and related enterprises.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital opened in 1889, followed four years later by the university’s School of Medicine, revolutionizing medical practice, teaching, and research in the United States.

The hospital is now part of the Johns Hopkins Health System, which includes two other acute-care hospitals and additional integrated health-care delivery components, with a network of primary and specialty care practices throughout Maryland, outpatient care, long-term care, and home care.

The Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876 as America’s first research university, founded for the express purpose of expanding knowledge and putting that knowledge to work for the good of humanity.

Two Interconnected Institutions: Over the years, the University and Hospital have grown, and—sometimes jointly, sometimes separately—they have created affiliated organizations. The Johns Hopkins Institutions is a collective name for the University and the Johns Hopkins Health System. The Johns Hopkins University includes nine academic and research divisions, and numerous centers, institutes, and affiliated entities. Johns Hopkins Medicine is a governing structure for the University’s School of Medicine and the health system, coordinating their research, teaching, patient care, and related enterprises.

130 job boards, duplications excluded 130 job boards, duplications excluded

Job category Distribution 6 months 1 year
Healthcare 42.9% 64% 22%
Other 12.4% 59% 14%
Administrative 4.5% 64% 14%
Executive Management 4.2% 28% 6%
Non-Profit & Volunteering 4.0% 49% 5%
Marketing & PR 3.8% 57% 1%
Consulting & Upper Management 3.8% 57% 3%
IT 3.5% 61% 3%
Food Services 2.0% 50% 17%
Customer Service 1.8% 60% 24%
Finance 1.8% 55% 17%
Construction 1.8% 69% 17%
Government & Military 1.7% 63% 21%
Human Resources 1.3% 68% 30%
Education 1.2% 73% 40%
Banking 1.2% 56% 39%
Insurance 1.2% 57% 28%
Engineering 1.1% 23% 15%
Protective Services 1.0% 79% 15%
Transportation & Logistics 0.9% 78% 16%
Legal 0.8% 61% 27%
Telecommunications 0.7% 57% 25%
Hospitality & Travel 0.7% 57% 1%
Manufacturing 0.7% 84% 10%
Arts & Entertainment 0.6% 51% 5%
Retail 0.1% 44% 46%
Sales 0.1% 67% 40%
Real Estate 0% 100%

Cardiovascular Trauma ICU RN

Johns Hopkins Medicine Bethesda, MD

The ICU at Suburban Hospital presents a unique opportunity for you as an experienced critical care nurse to immerse yourself in an environment that merges a close-knit, Magnet-recognized, community hospital experience with caring for high-acuity patients with cutting-edge technology. A 2019 AACN… Read more Director of Security

Johns Hopkins Medicine Baltimore, Maryland

Career Opportunities: Director of Security (237803) Requisition Number 237803 – Posted 05/05/2020 – Leadership – Johns Hopkins Hospital – Day Shift – Full Time (40 hours) – Weekend Work Required – Featured Jobs – Baltimore, MD Johns Hopkins Health System employs more than 20,000 people annually…. Read more Paramedic – Emergency Center Per Diem

Johns Hopkins Medicine Saint Petersburg, Florida

Paramedic – Emergency Center Per Diem POSITION SUMMARY: Performs routine patient activities and delegated patient care procedures of a specialized and technical nature. This may include observing and monitoring patient condition, identifying changes in collected patient data and notifying nurse,… Read more Community Health Specialist (Clinical)

Johns Hopkins Medicine Columbia, Maryland

Community Health Specialist (Clinical) The Community Health Specialists are hourly clinical staff who will provide support for program activities including but not limited to health fairs, community events and targeted outreach. These staff will provide screening services including taking biometric… Read more Patient Relations Coordinator

Johns Hopkins Medicine Saint Petersburg, FL

Job Details APPLY REFER A FRIEND BACK **Patient Relations Coordinator** **Requisition #:** 188195 **Location:** Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 **Category:** Clerical Read more Communications Project Coordinator

Johns Hopkins Medicine Baltimore, MD

Category: Non-Clinical Professional Work Shift: Day Shift Work Week: Full Time (40 hours) Weekend Work Required: Yes Date Posted: Jan. 28, 2020 Johns Hopkins Health System employs more than 20,000 Read more Director, Value Analysis

Johns Hopkins Medicine Hopkins, MN

Career Opportunities: Director, Value Analysis (188940) Requisition Number? 188940 ?-?Posted? 01/14/2020 ?-? Leadership ?-? Johns Hopkins Health System ?-? Day Shift ?-? Full Time (40 hours) ?-? Read more VP Finance- Johns Hopkins Home Care Group

Johns Hopkins Medicine Hopkins, MN

Source: https://lensa.com/child-day-care-assistant-jobs/baltimore/jd/178a6763163216387cb818911e23e3c4

The Growing Child: 1-Year-Olds

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Linkedin Pinterest Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones Babies and Toddlers Health Vision, Hearing and Speech

After a baby's first birthday, the rate of growth begins to slow down. Thebaby is now a toddler and is very active.

As your baby continues to grow, you will notice new and exciting abilities that develop. While babies may progress at different rates, the following are some of the common milestones your baby may reach in this age group:

  • Walks alone by 15 months, then begins to run
  • Can stop, squat, then stand again
  • Sits down on small stool or chair
  • Climbs stairs while holding on
  • Dances with music
  • Plays with push and pull toys
  • Can build towers blocks
  • Throws a ball overhand by 18 to 24 months
  • Puts 2- to 3-piece puzzles together
  • Scribbles with crayon or pencil and may imitate drawing a straight line or circle
  • Mostly feeds self with fingers
  • Begins to feed self with spoon
  • Drinks well from cup
  • Can help with dressing and may be able to undress simple clothes (such as clothes without buttons or zippers)
  • First molar (back) teeth appear
  • Takes one afternoon nap
  • May sleep 10 to 12 hours at night

What can my baby say?

Speech development is very exciting for parents as they watch their babies become social beings that can interact with others. While every baby develops speech at his or her own rate, the following are some of the common milestones in this age group:

  • Imitates animal sounds and noises
  • At one year, says 4 to 6 simple words
  • At 18 months, says 10 to 15 words
  • By 18 to 24 months, uses simple phrases or 2-word sentences (such as “Mommy up”)
  • By 2 years, says 100 or more words
  • Asks “What is…?”
  • Uses negative phrases such as “No want”

What does my baby understand?

By about 18 months of age, children begin to understand symbols—the relationship of objects and their meanings. While children may progress at different rates, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:

  • Waves bye-bye and plays pat-a-cake
  • By 18 months understands 1-step questions and commands such as “Where is the ball?”
  • By 24 months understands 2-step questions and commands such as “Go to your room and get your shoes.”
  • Understands object permanence (a hidden object is still there)
  • Understands the cause and effect relationship better
  • s to explore drawers and boxes to see what is inside
  • Make-believe play increases (such as may imitate housework or feed a doll)
  • Recognizes own face in mirror
  • Can point to body parts (such as nose, hair, eyes) when asked
  • Begins to understand use of certain objects (such as the broom is for sweeping the floor)
  • May ask for parent's help by pointing

How does my baby interact with others?

As children begin to walk, they may begin to show independence and will try to walk further away from the parent, but will return. Separation anxiety and fear of strangers may lessen, then return at about 18 months. While every child is unique and will develop different personalities, the following are some of the common behavioral traits that may be present in your child:

  • Plays along side others without interacting. This is called parallel play.
  • May begin clinging to parents around 18 months
  • May begin to say “no” more often to commands or needs
  • May have temper tantrums
  • May use a blanket or stuffed animal as a security object in place of the parent

How to help increase your baby's learning and emotional security

Consider the following as ways to foster the emotional security of your 1-year-old:

  • Give your child toys that can be filled and emptied and toys for imaginary play.
  • Give your child simple 2- to 6-piece puzzles and balls of all sizes.
  • Help your child build towers of blocks.
  • Encourage your child to “help” you with household tasks.
  • Give your child paper and large crayons to scribble and draw.
  • Talk to your child with clear simple language about what you are doing.
  • Use the correct names for objects, even if your child does not. For example, your child might say “wa-wa,” and you say “Water, that is right.”
  • Expand your child's sentences. If your child says, “Want cookie,” you say, “Do you want another cookie?”
  • Read to your child every day using picture and story books.
  • Feed your child at family mealtimes.
  • Provide consistent firm, appropriate discipline without yelling or hitting.

Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-growing-child-1yearolds

CHADIS | About Us

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Total Child Health, Inc. (TCH), was established in 2001 by Drs. Barbara Howard and Raymond Sturner, both physicians and leaders in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics. TCH is the sole distributor of CHADIS and partners with the non-profit, Center for Promotion of Child Development through Primary Care.

The Center’s mission is to conduct research and further develop computerized methods of assisting primary care clinicians in the detection, treatment, and prevention of mental, behavioral and developmental problems, as well as promoting positive development in all children and strengths in adults.

The Center focuses on developing capabilities to enhance routine check-up visits, including those with special health risk conditions. Physician training is a part of the core mission with a focus on innovation in “moment of care” decision support.

The Center and TCH work closely together with more theoretical and early development research conducted by the Center and commercialization and business operations handled by TCH.

The mission of Total Child Health, Inc. is to provide products and services that improve mental and physical health. In particular, the company focuses on the development and distribution of a web-based platform called CHADIS (Comprehensive Health and Decision Information System).

While TCH focuses on providing technology-based tools and services to clinicians, the Center has provided much of the research-based findings that constitute the backbone of the technology developed by TCH. TCH has been a recipient of thirteen NIH and CDC Small Business Innovation Research awards.

Together with the Center, CHADIS has received more than $15 million in federal and Foundation grants for research and development of the current system.

The true driver for the company’s success and the need for further development of its products and services are the desires of families using the system for the health of both children and adults.

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Barbara Howard is a developmental-behavioral pediatrician who trained with Dr. T. Berry Brazelton at Harvard University. Barbara is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and former Co-Director of the fellowship program.

She is a national speaker on child behavior problems and is a past President of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.

She was a contributing author for Bright Futures™, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Primary Care (DSM-PC) and Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health and has served on national committees of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Center for Promotion of Child Development through Primary Care

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Raymond Sturner is a developmental-behavioral pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and former Director of the Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Fellowship Training Program at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

He was previously Director of the Child Development Unit at Duke University.  His research interests have been focused on innovation in the clinical process of regular child health check-ups. CHADIS is an online clinical process support system that he co-founded.

He continues to be active in research and development involving CHADIS.  He has been the principal investigator of over 100 “grant years” of research and demonstration projects.

   He had his fellowship training in developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Yale University and pediatric training at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Women Infants and Children Program – WIC

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Home > Departments > Population, Family and Reproductive Health > Women Infants and Children Program

tel: 410-614-4848
e-mail: Johns Hopkins WIC

WIC is a federally funded program that provides healthy supplemental foods, nutrition counseling for pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children under age five.

The program has an extraordinary 30-year record of preventing children’s health problems and improving their long-term health, growth and development. WIC scored second highest in customer satisfaction among 30 high impact government programs in a recent survey.

WIC serves over 8.2 million women, infants and children through over 10,000 clinics nationwide.

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and provides:

  • Healthy supplemental foods
  • Nutrition assessment and education
  • Referrals to health and other social services to participants

The prototype for the National WIC Program was designed and piloted at this School and adopted nationally by Congress in 1974.

Johns Hopkins WIC Program

ANDROID

I-PHONE

WIC promotes the health and nutritional well-being of low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infants and children under five years of age living in Baltimore through practice, research and community engagement.

  • The program serves over 10,000 pregnant, breast feeding and post partum women, infants and children up to age 5.
  • Operates in twelve sites, Head Start, Shelters for the homeless and domestically abused women and children in Baltimore.
  • Over 75 percent of all infants participate in the program.
  • Peer counselors provide supportive services to breast feeding women.

21211

Hampden Family Ctr.1104 W. 36th St., 21211410.614.4848

2nd Thursday

21213

Belair/EdisonBaltimore Medical Systems3120 Erdman Ave.410.614.4848

Tuesdays

21215

JAI Medical Center4340 Park Heights Ave.410.664.1413

M,T,TH, F, 2nd & 4th Wednesday

Park West Medical Ctr.3319 W. Belvedere Ave.410.614.4848

1st & 3rd Wednesdays

21217

Dru/Mondawnin Healthy Families2100 Eutaw Place

1st & 3rd Thursdays

Gilmor Homes1515 Vincent Ct.410.614.4848

2nd Wednesday

21223

Adventure Dental & Vision1253 W. Pratt St.410.230.9473

Mondays & Fridays

21224

Eastern Ave3732 Eastern Ave.410.261.0001

M, T, W, TH, F

21225

Cherry Hill Shopping Ctr.634 Cherry Hill Rd.410.354.0162

M,W,TH, F

Judy Ctr. @ Curtis Bay Elementary/Middle School4301 W. Bay Ave.410.614.4848

2nd Monday

21287

Johns Hopkins Hospital600 N. Wolfe St. – Carnegie Building, Rm 267443.287.6594

M,T,W,TH,F

21230

Enoch Pratt Library Brooklyn Branch300 E. Patapsco Ave.410.614.4848

Call for appointment

Judy Ctr. @ Lakeland Elementary/Middle SchoolLakeland STEAM Ctr.2921 Stranden Rd.410.614.4848

Wednesdays

21231

Judy Ctr. @ Commodore Johns Rogers Elementary/Middle School100 N. Chester St.410.614.4848

1st Monday & Tuesday

21239

The Alameda Shopping Ctr.Adventure Dental & Orthodontics5632 The Alameda410.614.4848

1st & 3rd Tuesdays

Hopkins/USDA Participant Research Innovation Laboratory for Enhancing WIC Services (HPRIL)

HPRIL is the laboratory for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health working cooperatively with Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and competitively selected local WIC agencies nationally to explore through innovative and replicable interactive tools how to accurately determine the family characteristics that predict early termination and employ family based interactive tools and social media to retain eligible high risk children ages 1-4 in the WIC program for maximum benefit.

Visit the HPRIL page for more information.

Source: https://www.jhsph.edu/departments/population-family-and-reproductive-health/women-infants-children/

Family Programs – JHU Human Resources

Babies and Toddlers: Developmental Milestones | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Skip to content

Child Care Information & FAQ's

How do I reach the Family Programs team at JHU if I need help?
The JHU Family Support Services team is maintaining a list of up-to-date childcare resources during this crisis. You can reach them through the Benefits Service Center at 410-516-2000 or by email at Benefits@jhu.edu.

Are the JHU partner childcare centers staying open?
Governor Hogan issued an executive order requiring that all child care centers in Maryland be closed unless they are providing care for essential workers.

The Johns Hopkins Child Care and Early Learning Center at East Baltimore, Weinberg Early Childhood Center, and Homewood Early Learning Center are open for essential workers only.

Even if you are already enrolled, you must fill out an application to enroll during this emergency period.

My child’s school has closed but JHU is open, and I need childcare. What do I do?
You are expected to work your normal schedule and follow JHU’s normal leave policies. Work with your manager to determine whether your position is eligible and appropriate for Workplace Flexibility.

Please refer to the Sick and Safe Leave policy and JHU’s general Sick Leave policy. Also, FMLA entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a 12-month period for specified family and medical reasons. For specific questions regarding leave, contact HR Business Services at 443-997-2157 or HRBusinessServices@jhu.edu.

There is state-supported school age and early childhood care available for hospital health care workers.

Contact the Maryland Family Network, and a LOCATE specialist can refer you to child care providers who are accepting essential employees’ children.

Request service in the LOCATE: Child Care Registration Form, or call 1-800-999-0120, option 2. The State of Maryland website has additional information.

Plus, JHU provides all employees with 20 days (through June 30, 2020) of backup care through Care.com. You also receive a free premium Care.com membership, which allows you to perform self-directed searches for a variety of caregiving needs. You must register through JHU’s portal at or call 855-781-1303.

JHU provides support programs for all employees and their families through mySupport. You can reach mySupport 24/7, 365 at 443-997-7000 or online. For online access, the username is JHU and the password is JHU.

Are nannies, elder care workers, and backup childcare providers considered essential workers?
Child care and other types of “residential services” are considered essential.

 This means that a nanny, babysitter, or other type of caretaker can travel from one house to another and from one jurisdiction to another.

Maryland’s Office of Legal Counsel issued specific guidance stating that people taking care of children, seniors, or those with special needs can continue their work.

In this situation you are the employer for your caregiver. We suggest that you provide your caregiver with a letter to carry on public transportation or in the car. The suggested content for the letter is:

  • The name and address of the employee.
  • The name and address of the employer (your name and home address).
  • The nature of the employee’s work.
  • A brief statement of your work (attach your essential employee letter from Hopkins if you have one).
  • A signature and contact information for yourself.

Please remember that you are the employer for in-home caregivers, even if they have been hired through an agency such as care.com. The State of Maryland website provides exact guidance.

Part II of the panel discussion will keep the conversation going and allow panelists to answer more of the questions you may have.

Whether you’re having a baby, raising a child, or caring for an aging relative, we have resources for you, from lactation support, to adoption assistance, to help finding—and paying for—child care and eldercare.

Use the links below to find benefits and programs that fit your needs. And remember, our mySupport program can also help with a variety of issues, including finding child care or eldercare.

Be sure to also check out our LifeMart employee discount program. LifeMart offers discounts on select child care and eldercare services, as well as on other family-friendly services such as meal delivery.

Get ready for that new addition to your family.  The Johns Hopkins Baby Shower provides new and expectant parents with information about available leave policies, lactation support, child care options, and other available resources.

Learn More

Looking for quality child care in Maryland? Find options through our LOCATE: Child Care partnership and receive individual counseling to assess your child care needs and then be matched with available services.

You’ll receive referrals to registered family child care providers and licensed group programs, as well as follow-up assistance until placement is found. LOCATE also provides materials on specialized child care options and services, federal income tax credits for families, and state financial assistance programs.

Our Finding Child Care page also offers links to child care provider networks and services, some of which offer discounted rates to JHU employees.

Learn More

We’ve partnered with Care.com to provide 20 days of backup care per year at a reduced rate that’s your salary. Care.

com prescreens qualified caregivers to help you find in-home backup emergency care for children and adults, or in-center backup care for children. You also receive a free premium Care.

com membership, which allows you to perform self-directed searches for a variety of care-giving needs.

Learn More

Your JHU benefits include two programs that can help offset the cost of child care: child care vouchers and dependent care flexible spending accounts. Our LifeMart employee discount program can also help cut your costs.

Learn More

JHU Child Care Center Partners

JHU partners with three high-quality Baltimore-area child care centers that give admission and wait list priority to JHU employees. We also have relationships with other quality centers that offer wait list priority to our employees.

Learn More

As a parent, you’re responsible for assessing and monitoring the quality of the child care you choose. It’s important—and sometimes stressful—but we’ve got resources that can help, including safety information offered through our partnership with Care.com.

Learn More

Locate and register to use lactation rooms equipped with hospital-grade pumps and other comforts, get tips on successful milk expression after your return to work, and find manager resources, plus information on laws and JHU policies.

Learn More

Family Leave for New Parents

Parents can take paid time off using JHU’s birth recovery leave and parental leave after the birth or adoption of a child younger than 12. For a mother, this can mean up to 10 weeks of paid leave after childbirth (fathers and adoptive parents can get up to four weeks of paid leave).

Learn More

In addition to paid parental leave for parents adopting a child under the age of 12, we offer an Adoption Assistance Plan that can provide up to $15,000 toward eligible adoption costs.

Learn More

Gestational Surrogacy Program

Outside of the Adoption Assistance Plan, we offer a separate gestational surrogacy benefit that can provide up to $15,000 for eligible expenses associated with gestational surrogacy.

Learn More

We have a host of programs that can ease the challenges—emotional, financial, and practical—of caring for an aging adult.

Learn More

Source: https://hr.jhu.edu/benefits-worklife/family-programs/