Boosting Your Mood

Johns Hopkins to employ tech to help boost healthcare in Kuwait

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine International (JHI), the international arm of Johns Hopkins Medicine of Baltimore, Maryland, and the Ministry of Health of Kuwait (MOH) have signed a five-year agreement that calls for JHI to assist Kuwait in improving healthcare delivery in Kuwait.

Beginning in early 2012, JHI experts will work closely with Kuwaiti clinicians, nurses, hospital managers and administrators to better address medical issues and share innovations in the fields of trauma, orthopedics, rehabilitation, diabetes and obstetrics, pediatrics, and telemedicine.

John Hopkins will work with  four of Kuwait’s five secondary care public hospitals to develop in‐country talent in hospital administration and clinical care. The agreement was signed on December 25, 2011, by His Excellency Mustafa Gasim Al Shamali, Kuwait’s Minister of Finance and Minister of Health, and Steve Thompson CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine International.

“We are honored to enter this agreement,” says Steve Thompson, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine International. “Kuwait has many well‐trained and committed healthcare professionals working within well funded hospitals with advanced facilities and equipment.

We are privileged to be charged with the important task of helping to further strengthen Kuwait’s healthcare system.

It is truly a transformational project because, through these four facilities, JHI has the ability to impact the vast majority of the country’s population, working with our Kuwaiti colleagues to improve the delivery of clinical care throughout Kuwait.”

Johns Hopkins experts in clinical care, hospital management and hospital administration will collaborate with healthcare professionals at the Ministry of Health of Kuwait and four local hospitals–Amiri , Farwaniya, Jahra and Adan.

These hospitals account for more than 40 percent of the public-sector beds in the country.

The goal of the collaboration is to assist the government of Kuwait in raising the standard of healthcare delivery, and to increase the number and expertise of local doctors, hospital managers and administrators and nurses.

“This agreement with the government of Kuwait, with significant component of knowledge transfer, greatly expands the global presence of Johns Hopkins and augments our network of international health care operations,” says Mohan Chellappa, M.D., president of global ventures for Johns Hopkins Medicine International. “We look forward to joining forces with our Kuwaiti colleagues to enhance health care in this vitally important region of the world.”

According to the terms of the agreement, JHI will transfer knowledge in clinical and ancillary departmental protocols, continuing medical education, patient safety, preventive medicine, nursing, and healthcare policy. Johns Hopkins will also assist Kuwait to inaugurate management certificate and clinical certificate programs for healthcare providers.

Source: https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/johns-hopkins-employ-tech-help-boost-healthcare-kuwait

The Johns Hopkins Hospital Launches Capacity Command Center to Enhance Hospital Operations

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Johns Hopkins Hospital has launched a state-of-the-art, advanced hospital control center.

The Judy Reitz Capacity Command Center, designed and built with GE Healthcare Partners (GE), combines the latest in systems engineering, predictive analytics and innovative problem-solving to better manage patient safety, experience, volume, and the movement of patients in and the hospital, enabling greater access to Johns Hopkins’ lifesaving services.

The Capacity Command Center incorporates systems engineering principles, which are commonly seen in most complex industries, such as aerospace, aviation and power. But for health care, an industry that deals with critically ill patients, integrating these tools has been difficult.

 “The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a unique and complex institution with many working parts, and a unique institution requires a unique solution,” says Jim Scheulen, Johns Hopkins Medicine’s chief administrative officer for emergency medicine and capacity management. “Our Capacity Command Center helps us improve the experiences our patients have when they seek our care, and we are pleased to be among the leaders in this innovation.”

Inside the command center, about 24 staff members from different departments now work together in a single room, equipped with real-time and predictive information, and empowered to take action to prevent or resolve bottlenecks, reduce patient wait time, coordinate services and reduce risk.

The command center also houses a sophisticated system with a wall of computer monitors that provides situational awareness and triggers the command center team to take immediate action.

During a typical afternoon, the system receives about 500 messages per minute from 14 different Johns Hopkins IT systems generating real-time data to trigger action throughout the hospital.

“In the past, most hospitals, we were dependent on traditional technology — phones, email and IT systems — to manage the hospital, assign beds, etc.,” says Mary Margaret Jacobs, director of patient/family and visitor services for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. “The Capacity Command Center brings the latest high-tech tools into a NASA- control center here at our hospital.”

The technology in the Capacity Command Center keeps staff members informed 24/7 about when there is an influx of patients coming into the hospital, which hospital units need additional staff members, the status of how many patients are being treated, the need for and availability of beds across the hospital, the highest-priority admissions and discharges, and other information essential for ensuring high-quality patient care.

Since it opened earlier this year, representatives from 50 health systems across the U.S. and from four countries have visited the Capacity Command Center. Early results demonstrate improved patient experience and operational outcomes in the following areas:  

  • Patient transfers from other hospitals: There has been a 60 percent improvement in the ability to accept patients with complex medical conditions from other hospitals around the region and country.  
  •  Ambulance pickup: Johns Hopkins’ critical care team is now dispatched 63 minutes sooner to pick up patients from outside hospitals.  
  • Emergency Department: A patient is assigned a bed 30 percent faster after a decision is made to admit him or her from the Emergency Department. Patients are also transferred 26 percent faster after they are assigned a bed.  
  • Operating room: Transfer delays from the operating room after a procedure have been reduced by 70 percent.  
  • Patient discharges: Twenty-one percent more patients are now discharged before noon, compared to last year.

“The Capacity Command Center is giving front-line managers real-time information about their business,” Scheulen says. “Instead of relying on old data and information, we use information that’s very active, interactive and transparent so we can make the most informed decisions for our patients and their care.“

For more information on Command Centres and how they could help your organisation please contact Matthew Smith, Director of Marketing and Business Development at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..            

Source: https://emea.gehealthcarepartners.com/insights/128-digital-and-advanced-analytics/information-management-and-analytics/73-the-johns-hopkins-hospital-launches-capacity-command-center-to-enhance-hospital-operations

Can Probiotics Improve Your Mood?

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

By now, we know that a healthy diet is important for physical well-being. Researchers are studying whether probiotics — live bacteria that are safe to eat — can improve gastrointestinal health and your mood.

“Probiotics are what we believe to be good organisms that are beneficial to our health,” says Linda Lee, M.D.

But do they work?

Possible Benefits of Probiotics

Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that exist naturally in foods yogurt and kimchi. They’re also available in pill or powder form. Probiotics are thought to improve digestive health, and they’re often used to treat diarrhea or bloating. 

Probiotics can have many positive effects on the body, including:

  • Shaping the body’s immune system
  • Producing antimicrobial substances
  • Fermenting fiber in the diet to generate nutrients for the cells that line our intestines

Now researchers are finding evidence that the effects of bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) system send signals to the central nervous system, linking the gut with the brain. This could account for some known connections between GI illness and mental illness. For example, a higher-than-average number of people with irritable bowel syndrome also develop depression and anxiety.

Could better GI health via probiotics boost emotional health too? The link between probiotics and mood isn’t clear, says Lee.

She points out that certain foods can seem to boost mood — just think of the comfort foods we reach for when we’re low, whether it’s macaroni and cheese or a bowl of ice cream. However, this might simply be a behavioral association rather than something triggered by bacterial responses to nutrients in food.

“It's not to say that the food itself has nutrients that are affecting our mood, but it's that our brains associate eating that food with comfort,” she says.

Although it’s tempting to link probiotic use with mood, more research is needed, says Lee. “Right now, we don't have a lot of proof that taking probiotics is going to change depression or anxiety. It's an attractive theory, but we need a lot more research to guide us.”

Pick Your Probiotics Carefully

One problem with probiotics is a lack of consistency. Lee warns that consumers can’t always be sure of what they’re getting.

“Probiotics are considered food supplements, not drugs, by the FDA. Therefore, we don't have a lot of regulation over how they're made or whether they even contain what they say they contain,” says Lee.

In the United States, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are the probiotic strains most commonly used to treat GI issues, but there are many probiotic products on the market. They contain different types of bacteria and in different amounts. Lee cautions that the lack of regulation means that one batch might be different from another. 

“By the time you buy a probiotic off the shelf, there’s no way to know if the bacteria in it are as active as they were as when the product was made,” Lee says. In addition, each person may have different types and numbers of bacteria in their gut. This means the probiotic that works for one person might not work for another.

How to Take a Probiotic

The good news is that it appears most probiotic strains are probably harmless. But use caution. “There have been many studies that have shown that often what's on the label is not what's in the bottle. People really have to be careful,” Lee says. 

Will taking one a day improve your mood? The jury is still out, says Lee, and she cautions against using them as a replacement for any prescribed mood-managing medication. But if taking one a day for a month at least helps ease your gut issues, that alone might make you feel a little bit more “up.” 

But if the probiotic you’ve tried doesn’t have any effect at all? “It probably isn’t the right one for you,” concludes Lee.

Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/can-probiotics-improve-your-mood

The Johns Hopkins Hospital Reviews

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

SortPopularHighest RatingLowest RatingMost RecentOldest First

  • “great benefits package and teaching facility” (in 29 reviews)
  • “Name recognition in working for Hopkins, fast paced work environment, great benefits” (in 17 reviews)
  • “Low pay rate compared to other hospitals” (in 16 reviews)
  • “The city of Baltimore isn’t my favorite place, mostly because of safety” (in 10 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Great Benefits and great career opportunities

    Cons

    Pay is okay but it's hard to get paid what you really worth

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-09-07

  2. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    opinion is valued among superiors

    Cons

    lower salary then area hospitals

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-09-20

  3. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    JHH offers decent benefits, tuition reimbursement, health insurance and long time employees have pensions

    Cons

    Large organization…difficult to get salary increases, promotions. Have to leave and return to be promoted. Salaries are on the low end.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-05-16

  4. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    403 (B), Dental, Vision, etc.

    Cons

    Lack of communication and a harsh culture.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-04-28

  5. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    its a great place to learn !

    Cons

    Because they can replace you at any time i feel there arent enough incentives to stay… raises are pathetic

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-04-16

  6. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Lots of learning and advancement opportunities but it's highly dependent on which unit you work at. There's an education benefit if you have college-aged children.

    Cons

    Surrounding area is not safe especially for staff leaving during late hours (11p, 1a, etc). It's also not a union hospital so the pay is lower compared to other hospitals in the same area. The on-call requirement per schedule is also dependent on the unit, can vary from 12 to 24 hrs every 6 weeks. Benefits have gotten significantly less over the years.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-02-18

  7. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time

    Pros

    The best insurance in the class.

    Cons

    Everything except for the insurance.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-03-23

  8. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Hopkins has plenty of them! very challenging, but fulfilling place to work

    Cons

    pay is not equal to other hospitals in area

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-01-13

  9. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Teaching hospital, great health and education benefits.

    Cons

    No free parking, lack of team efforts in improving and providing quality patient care

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-01-13

  10. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Ability to move up the clinical ladder in some areas due to high turnover

    Cons

    Chronic understaffing, constant budget cuts, lack of accountability

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-12-27

See All PhotosSee All

Source: https://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/The-Johns-Hopkins-Hospital-Reviews-E121774.htm

Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts Collaborates with Johns Hopkins Medicine International on Enhanced Health and Safety Program at Properties Worldwide

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, the world’s leading luxury hospitality company, has entered into a collaboration with Johns Hopkins Medicine International, the global division of health care and research leader Johns Hopkins Medicine, to validate its new global health and safety program, Lead With Care, and provide ongoing, real-time guidance on the evolving COVID-19 situation. Grounded in the principles of care, trust and service, the Lead With Careprogramwill be reviewed and validated by Johns Hopkins Medicine experts and implemented by dedicated teams at Four Seasons properties around the world.

“Within this new environment, our singular goal is to provide guests, residents and employees with the confidence and assurance that their health and safety is our first priority,” says John Davison, President and Chief Executive Officer, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. “We are incredibly proud to work alongside the renowned experts at Johns Hopkins Medicine International, leveraging their global expertise to strengthen our already stringent health and safety measures through our new Lead With Care program.”

Continues Davison: “For nearly 60 years, Four Seasons has set the global standard for excellence in hospitality and service.

Lead With Care is a continuation of this high standard, building upon the strong foundation of trust and confidence that we have established through decades of experience.

This new program is abfering genuine care and the highest levels of service, enhancing procedures to protect our guests, residents and employees, while also ensuring that they feel safe and reassured.”

Four Seasons and Johns Hopkins Medicine International COVID-19Advisory Board

Johns Hopkins Medicine International and Four Seasons have established a dedicated COVID-19 Advisory Board, bringing together Four Seasons leadership and top experts from Johns Hopkins Medicine International to inform health and safety decisions the latest scientific knowledge.  

Evolving in lockstep with rapidly changing discoveries, the COVID-19 Advisory Board will create, enhance and review current procedures, along with virtual and in-person training to guide implementation of Lead With Care across Four Seasons global portfolio.

This builds upon the early experience of Four Seasons Hotel New York, as well as Four Seasons hotels in Riyadh and Mumbai, in providing accommodation to high-risk medical personnel fighting on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Four Seasons Hotel New York was transformed into a safely zoned environment in a matter of days, implementing enhanced procedures to safely house guests, as well as properly train all employees.

Lead With Care: Four Seasons Enhanced Global Health and Safety Program

Grounded in health care expertise and enabled by access to leading technologies and tools, the Lead With Care program is focused on providing care, confidence and comfort to all Four Seasons guests, employees and residents within the new COVID-19 environment. The new program outlines clear procedures that educate and empower Four Seasons employees to take care of guests and each other.

“Along with already-commonplace measures such as more sanitizers, masks and heightened cleaning and hygiene, our collaboration with Johns Hopkins equips our property teams with access to leading international experts and real-time COVID-19 information, enhancing our tools and training to deliver an experience grounded in safety and trust,” says Christian Clerc, President, Global Operations, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. “While the Four Seasons experience may look different in this new environment, it will ultimately feel the same – our dedicated people will continue to deliver the same intuitive service and personalised care for which Four Seasons is known and trusted for the world over.”

Four Seasons collaboration with Johns Hopkins Medicine International will ensure the review and validation of the Lead With Care program in two phases.

Phase one of the collaboration – Review and Validation – involves a comprehensive review of Four Seasons existing health and safety procedures along with enhanced protocols in response to the current situation at a global, regional and property level.  Working closely with Johns Hopkins Medicine experts ensures Four Seasons is at the forefront of the latest research findings and recommendations.

Phase two – Ongoing Guidance – provides Four Seasons with ongoing collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Medicine International team, including direct access to curated critical updates, relevant COVID-19 research outcomes, and expert advice to ensure real-time adjustments to operating procedures. Customised through on-property Hygiene Officers, this will allow Four Seasons to respond quickly and anticipate future needs, providing assurance that all appropriate infection control safety measures have been taken.

Four Seasons and Johns Hopkins will also establish a joint Response Team where senior experts in infectious diseases from Johns Hopkins will provide on-demand response and guidance to hotels facing COVID-19 situations.

Lead With Care Backgrounder

To support the development of procedures to be verified by Johns Hopkins, as well as the procurement of supplies and equipment for Lead With Careimplementation, Four Seasons will be working closely with EcoLab and International SOS – partners who were also critical in the transformation of the Four Seasons hotels in New York, Riyadh and Mumbai that housed medical personnel.

While guests will see many of the enhanced Lead With Care procedures, behind-the-scenes measures will also take place through employee training, additional food handling protocols, and enhancements to ventilation systems and other back-of-the-house operations.

In addition, Four Seasons continues to invest in its award-winning App and Chat that further allows guests to control how they engage with others – limiting face-to-face interactions while maintaining the highest levels of personal service.

Since its launch in 2017 the popular Four Seasons Chat – one of the only in the industry to be supported by actual employees on property, versus chatbots – has received 10+ million messages and averages approximately 580,000 messages a month.

Features include the ability to make and manage reservations, request luggage pickup, airport transfers, room service, restaurant and spa reservations, and much more.

Wait-free check-in and check-out is also offered, while Four Seasons Chat integration offers instant translation of 100+ languages giving guests the flexibility for contactless engagement throughout their stay.

Additional details about the Lead With Careenhanced global health and safety program can be found below:

Enhanced Cleanliness:

  • Each Four Seasons property appointing a Hygiene Officer focused on implementing enhancements to already stringent procedures;
  • Rooms disinfected daily with EPA approved products and will have blacklight inspection by room attendants;
  • Focused re-training programs for Housekeeping teams on all cleaning protocols are being implemented across the portfolio;
  • Public areas cleaned hourly with extra attention to frequented areas including front desk counters and public restrooms;
  • The COVID-19 Advisory Board exploring an array of options to equip properties with the latest tools and technology, including electrostatic spraying, ozone technology for air purification and/or UV technology for HVAC systems.

Heightened Guest Safety and Comfort:

  • Lead With Care kits placed in each guest room providing masks, hand sanitizer and sanitization wipes, with additional masks supplied on demand;
  • Social distancing measures embedded in all services for guest protection, including appropriately spaced fitness equipment, modified spa menu and services, contactless check-in and housekeeping services;
  • Restaurants and bars may operate with reduced capacity to ensure adequate space and socially distant set-up;
  • Nearly all restaurants providing a-la-carte service with digital menus wherever possible;
  • In Room Dining offering contactless delivery outside guestrooms along with sustainable, single-use packaging;
  • Four Seasons App and Chat providing guests with real-time, contactless interactions with employees from their own device on nine global platforms and in 100+ different languages.

Empowered Employees:

  • Lead With Care training building on Four Seasons legendary service model and diligent attention to detail, ensuring Lead With Careprocedures are delivered in a thoughtful, attentive manner that balances guest safety with personal reassurance and comfort;
  • Training focused on educating and empowering employees to deliver the enhanced health and safety program with confidence, passing on this care to each and every guest and resident;
  • The COVID-19 Advisory Board advising on the global training program for all employees including: ensuring employees have a well-informed understanding of the disease and its transmission, providing guidance on appropriate social distancing and use of personal protective equipment, as well as physical and mental health monitoring and support;
  • Grounded in emotional intelligence, employees are undergoing behavioural training, ensuring empathetic, personalised care and connection are not lost in the absence of close contact and limited face to face interaction.

About Johns Hopkins Medicine International

Johns Hopkins Medicine International is the Johns Hopkins Medicine entity entrusted with global advancement of the mission: to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and care.

Johns Hopkins Medicine International develops high-impact collaborations throughout the world by leveraging Johns Hopkins' extensive knowledge of medicine, nursing, public health, medical education, research and health care administration to improve health and health care delivery.

Johns Hopkins Medicine International also facilitates personalised, culturally appropriate care for Johns Hopkins Medicine’s global patients, as well as specialised concierge health care services.

Source: https://press.fourseasons.com/news-releases/2020/lead-with-care-program/

Johns Hopkins Hospital launches NASA-inspired command center to enhance hospital operations

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore has opened the Judy Reitz Capacity Command Center, which combines the latest technology in systems engineering, predictive analytics, experience, volume and patient flow.

The capacity command center was designed and built with GE Healthcare Partners with NASA's command center in mind. It incorporates systems engineering principles, which are typically seen in industries, such as aerospace, aviation and power.

Inside the command center
The command center is staffed by about 24 hospital workers from various departments. They work together in a single room, equipped with real-time and predictive information and empowered to take action to prevent or resolve bottlenecks, reduce patient wait time, coordinate services and reduce risk.

The command center houses a sophisticated system with a wall of computer monitors that provides situational awareness and triggers the command center team to take immediate action when needed. In a typical afternoon, the system receives about 500 messages per minute from 14 different Johns Hopkins IT systems generating real-time data to prompt responses throughout the hospital.

“In the past, most hospitals, we were dependent on traditional technology — phones, email and IT systems — to manage the hospital, assign beds, etc.,” said Mary Margaret Jacobs, director of patient/family and visitor services for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. “The capacity command center brings the latest high-tech tools into a NASA- control center here at our hospital.”

The technology in the command center provides 24/7 information about when there is an influx of patients coming into the hospital, which units need additional staff, the status of how many patients are being treated, the need for and availability of beds across the hospital, the highest-priority admissions and discharges and other essential information.

How the Judy Reitz Capacity Command Center has improved care
Since The Johns Hopkins Hospital opened the command center earlier this year, there has been a 60 percent improvement in the ability to accept patients with complex medical conditions from other hospitals and around the country. When it comes to ambulance pick up, Johns Hopkins' critical care team is now dispatched 63 minutes sooner to pick up patients from outside hospitals.

In the emergency department, a patient is assigned to a bed 30 percent faster after a decision is made to admit him or her. Patients are also transferred 26 percent faster after they are assigned a bed. Transfer delays from the operating room after a procedure have been reduced by 70 percent, and 21 percent more patients are now discharged before noon compared to 2015.

More articles on health IT:
Uber delivers free flu shots in 15 cities
Google donates $5M to Australian 'best in the world' healthcare startups
American Red Cross, Teladoc partner for disaster relief telehealth platform

© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2020. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here.

To receive the latest hospital and health system business and legal news and analysis from Becker's Hospital Review, sign-up for the free Becker's Hospital Review E-weekly by clicking here.

Source: https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/healthcare-information-technology/johns-hopkins-hospital-launches-nasa-inspired-command-center-to-enhance-hospital-operations.html

Johns Hopkins launches new effort designed to improve diagnosis, care, patient outcomes

Boosting Your Mood | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine and Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory today announced a joint effort to use rigorous data analysis and systems engineering practices to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

The partnership builds on existing efforts at Johns Hopkins brings together the medical and systems engineering expertise at the two institutions to create a “learning health system” that will speed the translation of knowledge to practice in key areas.

“The Applied Physics Lab brings significant new data analytics and systems engineering capability to the field of medicine,” said Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine. “These skills and experience have the potential to significantly enhance our capability to diagnose disease, predict outcomes, and treat patients better than we currently do.”

Added Ralph Semmel, director of the Applied Physics Laboratory: “Johns Hopkins Medicine is one of the world's leading medical research institutions and a pioneer in the development of advanced health care treatments. By lending our considerable systems engineering and data analysis capabilities, we will further strengthen the capacity of both organizations to make critical contributions in health care delivery.”

The partnership will build on existing precision medicine assets at Johns Hopkins.

These include the Johns Hopkins Individualized Health Initiative, an effort launched in 2013 to use data analysis to improve the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of health conditions.

It will also interact with the Johns Hopkins Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, a collaborative research effort designed to enhance the efficiency, effectiveness, and consistency of health care.

As part of the effort, Johns Hopkins Medicine has identified several conditions for which precision medicine will create efficiencies, improve patient outcomes, and foster new research and treatment platforms.

Johns Hopkins aims to launch eight precision medicine centers of excellence this year to highlight areas where new technologies and measurement tools can be applied to greatly improve patient care. The centers will focus on a number of different conditions, including heart failure, genetics, multiple sclerosis, arrhythmias, and prostate cancer.

“While totally unrelated diseases, these share the trait that a diagnosis alone cannot predict how the disease will progress or whether a patient will respond to a particular treatment,” said Antony Rosen, vice dean for research for JHU's School of Medicine. “With the use of new measurement tools and data analytics, patients can be divided into very distinct subgroups that are so different in trajectory, it's almost as if each subgroup represents a different disease.”

Currently, a physician's expertise develops over the span of his or her career based primarily on experiences with patients that physician has personally seen. The new centers at Johns Hopkins aggregate this collective scientific knowledge, Rosen said, systematizing diagnosis and enabling more focused treatment and outcomes.

The Johns Hopkins inHealth program and centers of excellence will collect more information from patients. In addition to family history, the various research teams hope to analyze biological markers in blood and genetic hallmarks, and incorporate additional societal and physical environment history and information.

“Patients come to Johns Hopkins for the excellent and innovative care,” Rosen said. “The medicine of tomorrow will require a deeper partnership with our patients who are willing to help move the research forward in all diseases.”

A new National Health Mission Area at APL will focus on programs designed to predict and prevent illness, injury, and disease; rapidly detect and respond to changes in health status; restore and sustain health; and improve overall health and human performance.

It builds on the laboratory's history of applying technology to solve critical challenges by focusing these capabilities to improve health and health care, says Sezin Palmer, executive for research and exploratory development at APL, who heads up the new mission area.

“We want to leverage APL's expertise to develop solutions across all care environments in a way that advances health and health care solutions for civilian, military, and veteran populations worldwide,” Palmer said.

“Our vision, shared by our Johns Hopkins University and School of Medicine partners, is to revolutionize health through science and engineering. It conveys the scale at which we aim to make an impact in this area.

We are not simply working to improve the state of health and health care in our nation, but to fundamentally disrupt and truly revolutionize it.”

Source: https://hub.jhu.edu/2016/10/17/hopkins-inhealth-precision-medicine/