Garlic Whipped Potatoes

California prepares for coronavirus surge in week ahead

Garlic Whipped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

LOS ANGELES — The mayor of the nation's second-largest city warned that the coronavirus may become so pervasive, families ought to prepare for how they will isolate themselves at home without infecting others in their households.

Anticipating a surge in COVID-19 cases this week that may overwhelm healthcare systems, Mayor Eric Garcetti urged people who test positive for the coronavirus not to rush to hospitals unless they have serious symptoms. Instead, he asked the city's 4 million residents to think about how they will separate themselves from family members while quarantining at home.

“Don't just take social distancing seriously, I hope each and every one of us take isolation seriously too,” Garcetti said as he described the strategy as the next phase in the fight against the pandemic.

He acknowledged that physical distancing may be hard for people living in tight quarters and said local officials were working to set up safe quarantine spaces for them.

Californians endured a weekend of stepped-up restrictions aimed at keeping them home as much as possible while hospitals and health officials scrambled Sunday to ready themselves for a week that could see a dramatic surge in coronavirus cases.

Testing among the state's 40 million residents has stepped up significantly after a slow start. Officials have warned the increase will bring with it a rapidly expanding number of cases. A Sunday evening tally by Johns Hopkins University found more than 6,200 cases statewide and at least 130 deaths.

California was stocking up on ventilators and fixing outdated ones in anticipation of a shortage at hospitals in the coming days. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Saturday that the federal government sent 170 broken ventilators from the national stockpile. Engineers at Bloom Energy, a fuel cell maker in San Jose, were racing to refurbish the ventilators and send them to hospitals.

In Southern California, people were kept off beaches and hiking trails that normally would have been swamped with visitors during this sunny weekend.

A stay-at-home order restricts people to all but essential outside activities such as buying food and including only outdoor exercise such as walking or running near home that doesn't put them within 6 feet (1.8 meters) of another person.

Officials closed California's 280 state parks to vehicular traffic on Sunday, citing overcrowding.

“This was the first time that we saw across Southern California our iconic beaches and trailheads, the parks that define who we are, the views that greet us at our best and worst moments weren't there except in our imaginations,” Garcetti acknowledged while thanking residents who heeded orders to stay home.

In Northern California, cloudy, drizzly weather led many to stick to the order but the restrictions could be tested soon with dry, warm weather forecast for the coming week.

San Francisco's subway and light rail system will be closed beginning Monday, with buses replacing light rail service. Rail ridership dropped by more than 90% when the city virtually came to a standstill.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.

Senior homes in Burbank and Yucaipa reported three deaths this weekend in potential outbreaks.

Vernon Robinson, a resident of the Alameda Care Center in Burbank, died Thursday in the hospital after his wife, Willa, said he had tested positive for COVID-19. The 81-year-old had Alzheimer's disease and underlying heart and lung conditions.

“That's not the way I wanted him to leave here,” Willa Robinson, 71, told The Associated Press. “He deserved more.”

Elizabeth Tyler, who represents both assisted-living facilities, said two residents have died from COVID-19 at the Alameda Care Center. She said five other residents and 10 employees have also contracted the virus.

Tyler said the Burbank nursing home had taken the two residents who died to the hospital for symptoms that were believed to be related to other health issues. She said once the facility learned of the positive tests, families of the other residents were contacted.

In Yucaipa, a city of about 53,000 in the foothills of the San Bernardino mountains, Tyler said an 89-year-old woman who lived at the Cedar Mountain Post Acute nursing home died from the virus Thursday.

San Bernardino County public health officials said 12 elderly residents at the home have tested positive in the county's first cluster of COVID-19 outbreak.

The U.S. had over 142,000 infections and 2,400 deaths, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases is thought to be considerably higher because of testing shortages and mild illnesses that have gone unreported.

The government's top infectious-disease expert warned Sunday that the coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans as smoldering hotspots in nursing homes and a growing list of stricken cities heightened the sense of dread across the country.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the dire prediction of fatalities on CNN, adding that millions in the U.S. could become infected.

Willa Robinson said she last saw her husband healthy on March 13 — the day before the nursing home prohibited visitors. She brought him his favorite meal of baked chicken, garlic mashed potatoes and carrots and left with their customary farewell.

“I love you,” she told him. “I love you more,” he replied.

She sat outside his hospital room Monday for two hours and watched through a glass window as he struggled to breathe. “I just prayed and asked God to get him his misery,” she said.

He died early Thursday morning. Now she must mourn her husband of 55 years alone in quarantine.

“Nobody can come to me,” she said.

Source: https://www.startribune.com/california-prepares-for-coronavirus-surge-in-week-ahead/569204502/

As virus makes goodbyes hard, fears of many more rise in US

Garlic Whipped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

(AP) – The coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans, the U.S. government’s top infectious-disease expert warned on Sunday as family members described wrenching farewells through hospital windows with dying loved ones.

Faced with that grim projection and the possibility even more could die in the U.S. without measures to keep people away from one another, President Donald Trump extended federal guidelines recommending people stay home for another 30 days until the end of April to prevent the spread of the virus.

Trump's extension of the original 15-day guidelines was a stark reversal just days after he said he hoped the economy could restart in about two weeks and came after Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the dire prediction of fatalities, adding that millions in the U.S. could become infected.

“We want to make sure that we don't prematurely think we're doing so great,” Fauci said of the extension of the federal guidelines.

By Sunday night, the U.S. had over 140,000 infections and 2,400 deaths, according to the running tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases is thought to be considerably higher because of testing shortages and mild illnesses that have gone unreported.

Worldwide, more than 720,000 people have been infected and nearly 34,000 have died, almost half of them in Italy and Spain, where the health system is at the breaking point.

New York state — where the death toll passed 1,000 — remained the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, with the vast majority of the deaths in New York City. But infections were spiking not only in cities but in Midwestern towns and Rocky Mountain ski havens. West Virginia reported its first death, leaving only two states — Hawaii and Wyoming — with none linked to COVID-19.

The virus is moving fast through nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other places that house elderly or otherwise vulnerable people, spreading ” fire through dry grass,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

Since the first major outbreak in the U.S. — at a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington — similar facilities around the country have battled infections among residents and staff.

A week ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 147 nursing homes in 27 states had patients with COVID-19. The problem has only worsened since.

In Woodbridge, New Jersey, a nursing home relocated all of its residents after two dozen were confirmed infected and the rest were presumed to be.

In Louisiana, at least 11 nursing homes, largely in the New Orleans area, have reported cases. In Mount Airy, Maryland, a death linked to the virus was recorded in a home where 66 people were confirmed infected.

The Tennessee governor's office said a nursing home there had about 60 residents and 33 workers confirmed positive.

Residents' loved ones are being kept away to try to slow the spread.

Willa Robinson, whose husband, Vernon, died Thursday, said she last saw him healthy on March 13 — the day before his nursing home in Burbank, California, prohibited visitors. She brought him his favorite meal of baked chicken, garlic mashed potatoes and carrots and left with their customary farewell.

“I love you,” she told him. “I love you more,” he replied.

She sat outside his hospital room days ago and watched through a glass window as he struggled to breathe. Now she must mourn her husband of 55 years in isolation.

“Nobody can come to me,” she said.

Others feared they may get no goodbye.

“I have a feeling that I very ly may never see my mother again,” said James Preller, whose 94-year-old mother, Ann Preller, is a resident at Peconic Landing, a retirement community on New York's Long Island where seven have died recently.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, the virus can cause severe symptoms pneumonia and can be fatal.

In New York, the virus is overwhelming some of the city's poorest neighborhoods, with data showing high rates of infection in densely packed areas with big non-English-speaking populations.

Dr. Craig Smith, who heads the surgery department at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, said the hospital will probably be forced into “apocalyptic scenarios” in the coming weeks in which ventilators and intensive care unit beds will need to be rationed.

Trump spoke of the haunting images he had seen on television this week of bodies being removed from Elmhurst Hospital in his native Queens and put in large refrigerated trucks.

“Body bags all over, in hallways,” Trump said. “I've seen things that I've never seen before.”

New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio asked the federal government to deliver 400 more ventilators and warned that the city will run masks, gowns and other supplies in a week if they don't get reinforcements.

Worry for the poorest was being echoed around the world.

In India, a lockdown covering the country's 1.3 billion people has put day laborers work and families struggling to eat. With no jobs, those living in the country's crowded cities are walking back to their native villages. Women in saris held babies on their hips. Others toted their belongings in bags normally used for cement.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi apologized for the hardships but said, “These tough measures were needed to win this battle.”

Though the U.S. has the most reported cases, five countries have higher death tolls: Italy, Spain, China, Iran and France.

Italy reported more than 750 new fatalities Sunday, raising its total to nearly 10,800. But the number of new infections showed signs of easing, with officials expressing cautious optimism that the most severe shutdown in the industrialized West is showing results.

Italy's civil protection agency said more than 5,200 new cases were recorded in the last 24 hours, the lowest number in four days, for a total of almost 98,000 infections.

Spain moved to tighten its lockdown and ban all nonessential work as it hit another daily record of almost 840 dead. The country's overall official toll was more than 6,500.

Egypt shut its beaches as cases in the Mideast surpassed 50,000. Police in the Philippines stepped up arrests of quarantine violators, and more tourists were evacuated from Mount Everest and the Indonesian island of Bali.

Russia ordered borders to close on Monday, Moscow all but confined its 12 million residents to their homes, and the head of the Russian Orthodox called on believers to stay away from churches and pray at home instead.

A prominent French politician with the virus died, the country's first death of a senior official.

Restrictions that would have been unthinkable weeks ago have been imposed in Europe and elsewhere. Parisians are fined if they try to leave the city, South Africans can't buy liquor, and Serbians are upset over a ban on walking their dogs. In Italy, burials are being held with only one family member.

As others tightened controls, China continued to ease its restrictions: Flights from Hubei province at the epicenter of the country's outbreak resumed Sunday. The focus of China's prevention measures has shifted to overseas arrivals, who have made up the bulk of new infections for more than two weeks. Virtually all foreigners are now barred from entering the country.

___

Sedensky reported from Philadelphia. Dazio reported from Los Angeles.

Contributing to this report were Associated Press writers Joseph Wilson in Madrid; Colleen Barry in Milan; Angela Charlton in Paris; Joe McDonald in Beijing; Geir Moulson in Berlin; Vanessa Gera in Warsaw; Jacquelyn Martin in Mount Airy, Maryland; Jonathan Drew in Durham, North Carolina; and Marina Villeneuve in Albany, New York.

___

This story has been updated to correct that Hawaii and Wyoming are the only remaining states with no reported deaths linked to the coronavirus, not Hawaii and Montana.

___

Follow AP news coverage of the coronavirus pandemic at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2020 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Source: https://www.wymt.com/content/news/Millions-of-Americans-urged-to-avoid-travel-as-coronavirus-spreads-569199761.html

A Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving

Garlic Whipped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Food-heavy holidays, such as Thanksgiving, can be particularly hard for those with type 1 diabetes. Between carb-heavy foods, meals served at odd times to accommodate everyone’s schedules and perhaps even multiple meals with different sides of the family or groups of friends, keeping your blood sugar in check on Thanksgiving is no easy task.

However, with careful planning and some support from your family and friends, enjoying Thanksgiving doesn’t have to be difficult!

As you’re celebrating, keep the following in mind:

  • Don’t show up hungry.
  • Choose white meat turkey over dark meat, and skip the skin.
  • Opt for steamed vegetables over casseroles. For example, serve seasoned steamed green beans with salt, pepper and garlic powder instead of green bean casserole.

Thanksgiving Recipes

If you’re responsible for preparing a dish for a potluck or an entire Thanksgiving meal, consider these T1D-friendly takes on traditional Thanksgiving favorites.

Cauliflower Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Makes 4 servings.

  • 1 medium head cauliflower
  • 1 tablespoon cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/8 teaspoon straight chicken base or bullion (may substitute 1/2 teaspoon salt)
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh or dry chives, for garnish
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  1. Set a stockpot of water to boil over high heat.
  2. Clean and cut cauliflower into small pieces. Cook in boiling water for about 6 minutes, or until well done. Drain well; do not let cool and pat cooked cauliflower very dry between several layers of paper towels.
  3. In a bowl with an immersion blender, or in a food processor, puree the hot cauliflower with the cream cheese, Parmesan, garlic, chicken base, and pepper until almost smooth.
  4. Garnish with chives, and serve hot with pats of butter.

Nutrition (per serving): 149 calories, 11.5 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 31 mg cholesterol, 170 mg sodium, 8 g carbohydrates, 4 g fiber, 4 g sugars, 5 g protein

Source: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/mock-garlic-mashed-potatoes-recipe-1942447.

Pumpkin Pie (with Crust)

Makes 10 servings.

For the pie crust:

For the filling:

Make the Crust:

  1. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F.  In the bowl of a food processor, pulse all crust ingredients EXCEPT egg to create thick crumbs, then pulse/process in the egg until a dough forms.
  2. Gather the dough into a ball, wrap in plastic, and chill in the refrigerator at least 20 minutes prior to rolling or pressing into your pie dish.
  3. To get the dough into your pie dish, you can either:
  4. Roll out the dough into a circle between two sheets of parchment. Place your pie dish upside-down over the dough, then using the bottom parchment paper, flip the dough into the dish. Finish by pressing it into the bottom and sides of the pie dish to fit – this dough will break easily since it lacks gluten, however, it also repairs incredibly easily and can withstand a lot of manipulation without affecting the final product! *
  5. If you don’t wish to roll out the dough (or find it tricky) you can simply press evenly into 9-inch pie dish using your hands.  Be patient and refrigerate dough as needed to make it easier to work with**
  6. Once pressed into the pie dish, gently pierce the dough with a fork all over so it doesn’t puff up while baking.
  7. Bake pie crust in 9” pie dish in the 375-degree oven for 12-15 mins until bottom is set, remove from oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes before pouring in filling.

Make the Filling:

  1. Whisk all ingredients except eggs, then whisk in eggs and egg yolk 1 at a time, don’t overmix.
  2. Pour filling into partially baked crust, spreading it all around to seal edges. Cover top with aluminum foil and bake (at 375 degrees F) 40-45 minutes or until center is nearly set (still a bit jiggly) and crust is deep golden brown.
  3. Allow to cool completely at room temperature to avoid excessive cracking of the filling. Once cooled, serve, or, cover and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days prior to serving.

Recipe Notes

*Coconut sugar will cause the crust to darken more than maple sugar

**Un a traditional gluten-containing crust, you can’t “overwork” the dough, so take your time as needed pressing it into the pie dish

Nutrition (per serving) 302 calories, 21 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 68 mg cholesterol, 5 g protein, 24 g carbohydrates, 10 g sugar, 3 g fiber, 144 mg sodium

Source: https://www.paleorunningmomma.com/classic-paleo-pumpkin-pie-crust-recipe/.

For more T1D-friendly recipes and eating tips, make sure to subscribe to our newsletter.

Source: https://diabetesresearchconnection.org/diabetes-friendly-thanksgiving-2/

Up to 200K U.S. deaths foreseen as virus impedes farewells

Garlic Whipped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans, the U.S. government’s top infectious-disease expert warned on Sunday as family members described wrenching farewells through hospital windows with dying loved ones.

Faced with that grim projection and the possibility even more could die in the U.S. without measures to keep people away from one another, President Donald Trump extended federal guidelines recommending people stay home for another 30 days until the end of April to prevent the spread of the virus.

Trump’s extension of the original 15-day guidelines was a stark reversal just days after he suggested restarting the economy in about two weeks and came after Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the dire prediction of fatalities, adding that millions in the U.S. could become infected.

“We want to make sure that we don’t prematurely think we’re doing so great,” Fauci said of the extension of the federal guidelines.

By Sunday night, the U.S. had over 140,000 infections and 2,400 deaths, according to the running tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases is thought to be considerably higher because of testing shortages and mild illnesses that have gone unreported.

Worldwide, more than 720,000 infections were reported, and deaths topped 33,000, half of them in Italy and Spain, where the health system is at the breaking point.

New York state — where the death toll passed 1,000 — remained the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, with the vast majority of the deaths in New York City.

But spikes in infections were recorded around the country, not only in metropolitan areas but in Midwestern towns and Rocky Mountain ski havens.

West Virginia reported its first death, leaving only two states — Hawaii and Montana — with none linked to the outbreak.

The virus is moving fast through nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other places that house elderly or otherwise vulnerable people, spreading “ fire through dry grass,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

Since the U.S. saw its first major outbreak of the coronavirus earlier this month — centered at a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington — a stream of similar facilities have battled infections among residents and staff.

A week ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 147 nursing homes in 27 states had patients with COVID-19. The problem has only worsened since.

In Woodbridge, New Jersey, a nursing home relocated all of its residents after two dozen were confirmed infected and the rest were presumed to be. In Louisiana, at least 11 nursing homes, largely in the New Orleans area, have reported cases. In Mount Airy, Maryland, a death linked to the virus was recorded in a home where 66 people were confirmed infected.

Residents’ loved ones are being kept away to try to slow the spread.

Willa Robinson, whose husband, Vernon, died Thursday, said she last saw him healthy on March 13 — the day before his nursing home in Burbank, California, prohibited visitors. She brought him his favorite meal of baked chicken, garlic mashed potatoes and carrots and left with their customary farewell.

“I love you,” she told him. “I love you more,” he replied.

She sat outside his hospital room about a week ago and watched through a glass window as he struggled to breathe. Now she must mourn her husband of 55 years in isolation.

“Nobody can come to me,” she said.

Others feared they may get no goodbye.

“I have a feeling that I very ly may never see my mother again,” said James Preller, whose 94-year-old mother, Ann Preller, is a resident at Peconic Landing, a retirement community on New York’s Long Island where seven have died recently.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, the virus can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and lead to death.

In New York, the virus is overwhelming some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods, with data showing high rates of infection in densely packed areas with big non-English-speaking populations.

Dr. Craig Smith, who heads the surgery department at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, said the hospital will probably be forced into “apocalyptic scenarios” in the coming weeks in which ventilators and intensive care unit beds will need to be rationed.

Trump spoke of the haunting images he had seen on television this week of bodies being removed from Elmhurst Hospital in his native Queens and put in large refrigerated trucks.

“Body bags all over, in hallways,” Trump said. “I’ve seen things that I’ve never seen before.”

New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio asked the federal government to deliver 400 more ventilators and warned that the city will run masks, gowns and other supplies in a week if they don’t get reinforcements.

Worry for the poorest was being echoed around the world.

In India, a lockdown covering the country’s 1.3 b sillion people has put untold numbers work and left many families struggling to feed themselves. Tens of thousands in New Delhi were forced to flee their homes, with no way to pay the rent, journeying back to their native villages. Women in saris held babies on their hips. Others toted their belongings in bags normally used for cement.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi apologized for the hardships that the lockdown brought but said, “These tough measures were needed to win this battle.”

Though the U.S. leads the world in reported cases, five other countries have higher death tolls: Italy, Spain, China, Iran and France.

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

Source: https://www.weirtondailytimes.com/news/local-news/2020/03/up-to-200k-u-s-deaths-foreseen-as-virus-impedes-farewells/

Johns Hopkins Cancer Email Hoax

Garlic Whipped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Here is something that has probably passed through your email box in the last few years. It’s called the “Johns Hopkins Update”. Here’s how they start the email:

“AFTER YEARS OF TELLING PEOPLE CHEMOTHERAPY IS THE ONLY WAY TO TRY (‘TRY’, BEING THE KEY WORD) TO ELIMINATE CANCER, JOHNS HOPKINS IS FINALLY STARTING TO TELL YOU THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY.”

So you’re hooked, right? It sounds great and apparently came from Johns Hopkins University, a reliable source for information. WRONG! It might surprise you to know that not everything that comes through your email is true!

Just you have to do at the grocery store, don’t believe the packaging! This email has been circulating for years and has gone around so much that Johns Hopkins University actually debunks all the points in the email one by one. It’s great!

Here’s what I suggest that you do when you get an email, or even word-of-mouth story on the most “recent” or “hidden” cancer cures. If it’s an email, always check out Snopes to see if they have it listed. They are a great place to find out if the email is a known urban legend.

For cancer specific information, you can check out Quackwatch or Cancer Treatment Watch. They are a good place to find evidence based information regarding alternative cancer or health related treatments and “cures”. They give you the facts and leave it up to you to make a decision.

The Johns Hopkins Cancer Update Hoax:

For information on the origin of the email, check out this article from snopes.com: Cancer Update from Johns Hopkins.

And for the full article from Johns Hopkins regarding this email, check out their response here: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/news_events/featured/cancer_update_email_it_is_a_hoax.html.

Here are what I found to be the highlight:

Cancers Feed on Certain Foods

Thepremise is that cancer cells feed on certain foods, and if a personrefrains from eating these foods, the cancer will die. According to ourexperts, a poor diet and obesity associated with a poor diet is a riskfactor for the development of cancer.  However, there is no evidencethat certain foods alter the environment of an existing cancer, at the

cellular level, and cause it to either die or grow.

Eating less meat, while a goodchoice for cancer prevention, does not free up enzymes to attack cancer

cells.

Moderationis key, says Platz. As part of a balanced diet, sugar, salt, milk,coffee, tea, meat, and chocolate–the foods the “Update” calls intoquestion–are all safe choices, she says. Abalanced nutritious diet, healthy weight, physical activity, andavoiding alcoholic drinks may prevent as many as 1/3 of all cancers.Platz recommends eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables

per day and limiting red and processed meats, hot dogs.

Several Johns Hopkins experts participated in the World Cancer Research Fund – American Institute for Cancer Research report Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective,published in November 2007, which is considered by cancer preventionexperts to be an authoritative source of information on diet, physicalactivity and cancer. Their recommendations for cancer prevention and for

good health in general are:

  1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.
  2. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day.
  3. Avoidsugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy-dense foods (particularly

    processed foods high in added sugar, or low in fiber, or high in fat).

  4. Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.
  5. Limit consumption of red meats (such as beef, pork and lamb) and avoid processed meats.
  6. If consumed at all, limit alcoholic drinks to 2 for men and 1 for women a day.
  7. Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt (sodium).
  8. Don’t use supplements to protect against cancer.

Ourexperts recommend that people meet their nutritional needs throughtheir food choices. While vitamin supplements can be helpful in peoplewith nutritional deficiencies, evidence suggests that supplementation

above what the body can use provides no added health benefit.

Conclusion

Although well intentioned, many people forward emails that they do not know are accurate. Before you hit the FORWARD button for any email, check your facts! And when you find out that something isn’t true, reply all to whomever sent it to you and try to set the record straight.

Another strategy is to hit forward to anyone you would’ve forwarded it to and give them a heads up that an email hoax is going around, so that if they get it, they can stop the spread of misinformation. I think we could all benefit from a little less of that!

– Julie

Source: https://www.cancerdietitian.com/2011/03/johns-hopkins-cancer-email-hoax.html