Healthy Snack Recipes

MedHacks 2019

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

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Blast Off!!!!!!

2019 MedHacks hosted at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
September 27-29

Info Packet

MedHacks was started in 2015 with the mission to bring together talented and diverse minds from all backgrounds and foster collaboration towards solving the world’s most pressing medical issues.

In the past three years, MedHacks has been attended by thousands from over 500 institutions and 30 countries, has formed partnerships with companies at the forefront of medicine and technology including Blue Cross Blue Shield, CVS Health, Google, and KPCB, and has established itself as one of the world’s most recognized and influential medical hackathons. The MedHacks brand has grown into something larger than our flagship medical hackathon with the introduction of our now annual Mini-MedHacks, a 1-day medical hackathon for Baltimore city high-school students and last spring’s China-U.S. HealthTech Forum, an event bringing together speakers such as Jim Lai, the VP of Tencent, and Lee Chang, the VP of Baidu Ventures, to talk about the global state of healthcare innovations.

We believe that the most pressing medical challenges must be solved by interdisciplinary and diverse teams of people. We don’t care about whether or not you’ve won coding competitions, or even if you’re pursuing an engineering or CS degree. You don’t need a PhD or MD to innovate in healthcare, all you need is a passion for bettering humanity.

Last year at MedHacks 2018, we hosted over 500 hackers with diverse majors ranging from public health to anthropology to computer science. We had participants of all ages, including undergraduates, graduate students, MD students, nursing students, and medical professionals, come together with their diverse expertise and backgrounds to solve problems.

Part of the MedHacks experience is our track system. Before the hacking period starts, there will be an open brainstorming and ideation phase for each of the tracks, so that hackers can get ideas for their projects and meet others with similar interests.

At MedHacks 2018, the tracks were Patient Safety and Quality with Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Nursing, Community Health Infrastructure with Blue Cross Blue Shield, and Open Science to Advance Health Equity with the Johns Hopkins Alliance for a Healthier World.

Our tracks for MedHacks 2019 will be announced soon!

Chris Larkin is the Chief Technology Officer for Health Markets at Elsevier, a global science and health information analytics company.

Elsevier's scientific articles accounted for 25% of global research citations in 2018, and their ScienceDirect research database had 16 million monthly unique visitors. Elsevier's Health Markets division aims to create solutions to clinical problems and to empower education with innovative technologically based teaching strategies.

Chris Larkin has years of expertise in the health sciences domain. Before joining Elsevier, he was the VP for GE Digital's Predix Advanced Analytics and Data Products as well as CTO for GE Healthcare.

David West is an entrepreneur and technologist with a background in computational biology. He is the founder and CEO of Proscia. Proscia, founded in 2014, was inspired by research at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Under David’s leadership, Proscia has earned recognition as a market category leader in digital pathology, raising a total of $12.3M in funding to date. David has been recognized by Forbes 30 Under 30 as well as Inc. Magazine as one of the top 50 Global Entrepreneurs Under 25.

He has a degree in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

Aaron Feierstein is currently a Senior Corporate Development Advisor for Healthworx, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield’s corporate investment, corporate development and commercialization arm. In his role, Aaron is responsible for identifying disruptive healthcare startups, structuring partnerships and managing a diverse portfolio of innovation pilots.

Prior to working at CareFirst, Aaron held multiple client service and business development roles after founding and selling a vending machine company in college. Aaron graduated with a Master of Business Administration and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from The University of Maryland at College Park.

Aaron lives in Baltimore, Maryland with his wife and dog and enjoys running, golfing and playing tennis.

A hackathon is a place where people learn, play, and make. A hackathon is where people perform superhuman feats and solve problems in short periods of time. Hackathons are ly the most exciting thing you don't know too much about.

But more broadly defined, a hackathon is a multi-day event where people come together, ideate, and work intensively on ideas and products.

MedHacks is a student-run event that focuses on innovating at the crossroads of medical entrepreneurship and technological development.

By working together for the weekend, hackers at MedHacks will gain unique opportunities to learn from each other and from experts at the forefronts of medicine and technology – integrating their learning into real solutions to pressing medical challenges.

We will have sleeping rooms on site for participants to sleep in. Just be sure to bring a sleeping bag or blanket!

Applications for MedHacks 2019 are open! Please sign into our application portal here.

Sign into the MedHacks application portal here, and your application status, as well as the status of any other pending applications (travel reimbursements, etc), will be displayed on your profile page.

At least four members of the MedHacks executive team read each and every application made to MedHacks and decide as a group whether to offer acceptance to a applicant. All MedHacks admission decisions are final and we do not offer the reasoning behind any applicant's acceptance or rejection for any reason.

Almost anyone is eligible to participate in MedHacks 2019. If you are under 18, you must be a JHU affiliate to attend.

If you’re a graduate student or professional, you can choose to join MedHacks either as a participant or as a mentor!

If you are accepted and remarked on your application that you would need a travel reimbursement, you may be invited to apply for a travel reimbursement. In that case, sign into the MedHacks application portal and follow the links for the travel reimbursement application.

Once you are accepted for a reimbursement, you must submit a VALID receipt. Your reimbursement is contingent upon your submitting a valid receipt. Failure to do so will result in MedHacks’ inability to issue said reimbursement.

MedHacks receives thousands of applications from talented and diverse people all around the world every year, but unfortunately we don’t have the space to accommodate everyone who would to attend.

MedHacks prides itself on being accessible for all students, especially those without any kind of computing background, and so we try as hard as possible to reflect that in the population of participants at the event.

We encourage all individuals interested in any (or all!) of the fields of medicine, technology, and entrepreneurship to apply.

We’d love to have you! We follow a rolling application basis, so the earlier you apply, the more ly you’ll be able to be accepted! General applications will be closing on September 20th at 11:59 PM EST. Applications for JHU students close on September 25th at 11:59 PM EST. If you have any questions about the event or the application process, please contact us at info@medhacks.io.

This year, in order to streamline the application process, our talented team of developers have developed an application portal. Once you create an account you can submit an application, view the status of your application and view any resources.

If you are interested in receiving a travel reimbursement, you must indicate this on your application. You can then fill out travel reimbursement applications if you have indicated it on their application. We offer reimbursements in $50, $100, $250 increments depending on where you are coming from.

The deadline for a National/International travel reimbursement (up to $250) is July 31st at 11:59 PM EST. The deadline for a Midwest/Regional travel reimbursement (up to $100) is August 31st at 11:59 PM EST.

Additionally, we’ve previously sent buses to universities such as the University of Maryland and UMBC, and would love to consider sending to yours as well! Please contact us at info@medhacks.io if you’re interested in having a bus from your school.

Please note that if your forms are not filled out correctly by the due date, you will not receive a travel reimbursement. There will be no exceptions to this rule.

MedHacks is unable to sponsor visas.

Apply

Source: https://medhacks.io/2019/

The Healthy Way Johns Hopkins Hospital Treats Social Media | Healthcare Social Media

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The healthcare industry is rather conservative, which has made it more difficult for healthcare marketers to get involved in the less-traditional world of social media.

Fortunately, any initial hesitation is rapidly subsiding as more and more healthcare brands and organizations are seeing the way social media is being warmly embraced by patients and bringing valuable opportunities for consumer communication.

One strong social advocate is Stacy Poliseo, whose role as the social media voice for Hopkins Medicine has given her incredible insight into making social media a worthwhile part of a healthcare organization. SocialMediaToday.com spoke with the social specialist to learn how she approaches social media for a healthcare leader Johns Hopkins.

According to Ms. Poliseo, the Hopkins approach to social media marketing is to share the depth of the institution in both cutting-edge research and personal patient care.

She strives to update the international professional community while reaching out to the local audience.

With patients, her primary goals are to humanize the brand, join in on the conversation, and listen to the patient voice in an effort to show how Hopkins is a supportive resource they can trust.

One of her social media successes at Johns Hopkins was a campaign that promoted the new Sheikh Zayed Tower and The Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center. Since these buildings were far from finished at the time of the campaign, Ms.

Poliseo relied on an innovative application to create a building-centric page directly on the Johns Hopkins page.

This additional page featured details, a video tour, a construction timeline, and a countdown clock to teach visitors all about the new buildings.

“This page drove over 20 percent of new s,” said Ms. Poliseo. “Patients wrote congratulation posts and we generated a lot of excitement about the buildings. It was a great example of the public integrating with Hopkins Medicine.”

Ms. Poliseo may be a social marketing pro, but she admits to learning two important lessons about social media marketing at Hopkins.

The first is going beyond the mainstream social networks to seek out the smaller communities where patients are flocking and listen to what they’re saying. The simple act of listening offers enormous insight into what patients really want.

The other is not to assume anything about your social media audience, but instead get to know them. It may be surprising to see how social media spans all demographics, but it’s important to become familiar with each audience in order to engage with them most effectively.

“My advice would be to listen, learn and adapt,” she said.

Find the remedy to your healthcare marketing issues. Contact MDG Advertising.

MDG Advertising, a full-service advertising agency with offices in Boca Raton and New York, NY, is one of Florida’s top healthcare marketing companies, whose clients include Dental Care Alliance, MDVIP, Max Planck Florida Institute, Primary Pharmaceuticals, and HCA East Florida. MDG’s 360° approach uses just the right mix of marketing media to reach your advertising goals, where traditional, digital, and social media marketing efforts support each other and your message is tailored to the medium. To learn more about the latest trends in healthcare marketing, contact MDG Advertising. To learn more about how leading healthcare organizations are ensuring that social media becomes a primary part of the healthcare experience, see “Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media Seeks to Improve Global Healthcare.”

Written by Michael Del Gigante

Source: https://www.mdgadvertising.com/marketing-insights/the-healthy-way-johns-hopkins-hospital-treats-social-media/

Management of Dry Mouth

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

General Measures

The following tips help to reduce dry mouth symptoms:

  • Sip water or sugarless drinks often
  • Let small ice chips melt in your mouth
  • Avoid drinks with caffeine, such as coffee, tea, and some sodas – caffeine can dry out the mouth
  • Sip water or a sugarless drink during meals. This will make chewing and swallowing easier, and may also improve the taste of food
  • Chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless hard candy to stimulate saliva flow; citrus, cinnamon or mint-flavored candies are good choices
  • Do not use tobacco or alcohol, they dry out the mouth
  • Be aware that spicy or salty foods may cause pain in a dry mouth
  • Use a humidifier at night

Stimulation of Saliva Flow

Increasing salivary flow can be achieved by chewing sugar-free gum, sucking on lozenges (e.g. Numoisyn and Salese) or sugar-free candies, or taking certain medications.

Commonly used over-the-counter products include Xyli-Melt and Salese lozenges and Biotene dry mouth products (gel, spray, toothpaste). Snacking on carrots or celery may also help.

Products that contain xylitol can help reduce the risk for dental decay (e.g. Numoisyn and Salese lozenges, Biotene gum, diabetic candies).

Pilocarpine (Salagen) and cevimeline (Evoxac) are prescription medications that stimulate saliva production. Both are used to treat dry mouth by stimulating saliva flow. They should not be used if you have asthma, glaucoma, or heart arrhythmias. The most common side effect is excessive sweating.

To minimize this, it is best to start the medication with one pill at bedtime and then increase after one week to one pill in the morning and one pill in the evening. After another week, increase to one pill three times a day. Other potential side effects include upset stomach or throwing up, nose stuffiness, and lowered night eyesight.

You can take the drug with or without food. It can take up to 2 months for these medications to have full effect.

Minimize the use of medications that can cause a dry mouth.

Many of these are prescription medications (such as anti-depressants, muscle relaxants, and anti-spasmodics for overactive bladders and bowel cramps).

Talk with your physician as to whether these types of medications can be discontinued. Some over-the-counter medications can also cause a dry mouth, such as anti-histamines and decongestants.

Salivary Substitutes

Artificial saliva or saliva substitutes can be used to replace moisture and lubricate the mouth. These substitutes are available commercially and come in a variety of formulations including solutions, sprays, gels and lozenges.

In general, they contain an agent to increase viscosity, such as carboxymethylcellulose or hydroxyethylcellulose, minerals such as calcium and phosphate ions and fluoride, preservatives such as methyl- or propylparaben, and flavoring and related agents. It is worthwhile to check out “dry mouth” products on Amazon.com.

They have many different ones, and reviewing the website will give you a sense of what is available. Try different ones to find the best for you. Patient preference regarding taste, mode of use, etc are key factors in choosing one.

Diet

Eat sugary foods only during a regular meal. Eliminate dietary sugar (e.g., sucrose, glucose, and fructose) intake between meals, both in terms of snacks and beverages. Purchase “sugar-free” snacks and candies (not “sugarless,” which often contain “less” sugar rather than no sugar!).

These sugar-free snacks contain sweetening agents that do not cause dental caries, such as xylitol, sorbitol, saccharin, aspartame, or sucralose.

There is evidence that the use of a xylitol-containing gum or candy four to five times a day for 5 minutes after meals and snacks can reduce caries-producing bacteria.

Do not sip on carbonated beverages (e.g. a can of soda) between meals. The acidity of the beverage cannot be buffered without food and this prolonged fermentable carbohydrate and acidity in the mouth promotes dental decay. Should you drink, drink quickly (including juices). Try to consume juices that are fortified with calcium and fluoride and rinse with water afterwards.

Dental Care

Practice scrupulous oral hygiene. Brush and floss regularly and use fluoride daily. Your teeth should be cleansed at least twice daily using a soft bristled electric toothbrush and mildly flavored (avoid strong minty flavor) low-abrasive toothpaste. Choose “dry mouth” toothpastes.

They do not contain sodium lauryl sulfate, a chemical in most regular toothpastes which may contribute to the formation of canker sores. Avoid whitening, tartar control, or smokers toothpastes since these contain abrasives.

For the first 30 seconds, use the dry brush and brush the lingual (inside) surface of your teeth, then moisten toothbrush and apply a dry mouth toothpaste (e.g. Biotene, Pronamel, CloSYS, Orajel, Sensodyne) and brush for 1.5 minutes.

Floss between all adjoining teeth at least once daily to remove dental plaque. Carry a travel toothbrush and toothpaste with you to work and brush after meals and snacks.

Do not brush immediately after consuming acidic beverages or food (lot of food and fruits, including salad dressings, are acidic). Instead rinse mouth with plain water or low fluoride containing rinse (e.g.

ACT) and brush after half an hour.

If you are at low-to-moderate risk of caries, you should use a 0.05% sodium fluoride mouth rinse (available over the counter, such as ACT or Colgate Fluorigard) for 1-2 min. daily, before sleep. Hold the sodium fluoride rinse in your mouth for at least one minute before expectorating.

If you are at high risk of caries, your dentist or physician should prescribe 1.1% neutral sodium fluoride toothpaste (such as Prevident 5000 or SF 5000) to be used once daily in place of your regular toothpaste.

Prescription fluoride toothpastes can be applied with a toothbrush and left in place for two to three minutes before expectorating. Do not swallow the prescription fluoride toothpaste.

If dental caries develop in spite of daily use of topical fluoride, a soft acrylic carrier can be constructed for nighttime use of fluoride gels.

Denture Care

Take your dentures out before going to sleep and disinfect them as follows: Plastic (acrylic) dentures: Dentures should be soaked in sodium hypochlorite (1 part household bleach to 10 parts water) for 10 minutes, before rinsing and leaving in plain water for the rest of the time.

Dentures with metal parts: Should be soaked in chlorhexidine mouthwash for at least 20 minutes, before rinsing and leaving in plain water for the rest of the time. Rinse dentures well with cold water after soaking.

Alternatively, you can use DentaSoak (Great Lakes Orthodontics, 1-800-828-7626) to disinfect them for 15 minutes nightly.

To remove concretions from the denture/appliance, place them in full strength vinegar for 10 minutes, and brush gently to remove the mineralized material. Repeat as needed until the denture surface is clean and smooth.

Dry Lips

Apply Vaseline, Aquaphor or Vitamin A&D ointments (petrolatum and lanolin), pure lanolin (e.g. Lansinoh), Burt’s Bees beeswax lip balm, or coconut oil frequently during the day. Do not lick your lips.

Candidiasis

Oral candidiasis is an infection resulting from overgrowth of fungal micro-organisms normally present in the oral cavity.

Candidiasis may result from a recent illness, course of antibiotics, chronic use of a steroid inhaler, other steroid use, smoking, denture use, and dry mouth.

Symptoms include a painful mouth, sometimes with a burning sensation, and sensitivity to spicy or acidic foods. In addition, there may be redness and cracking of the corners of the lips.

Treatment of oral candidiasis in the setting of dry mouth requires anti-fungal medication, taken as either a daily pill or as a topical treatment, in the form of a troche (which is allowed to dissolve in the mouth) or a solution (which is swished around in the mouth before swallowing).

To reduce the frequency of recurrences of oral candidiasis, soak your toothbrush, etc. in full-strength household bleach for I0 min, set timer, to disinfect. Rinse thoroughly in cool water before using. Repeat weekly.

If your metal dentures/appliances turn black in bleach or have soft liner, order DentaSoak (Great Lakes Orthodontics, 1-800-828-7626) to disinfect them for 6 hours daily wbile asleep. Do not sleep with dentures in mouth.

Learn more about:

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Source: https://www.hopkinssjogrens.org/disease-information/treatment/management-of-dry-mouth/

Alpha Epsilon Delta Health Preprofessional Honor Society

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Alpha Epsilon Delta is the world's largest health pre-professional honor society with more than 144 thousand members and 186 chapters. The Johns Hopkins Maryland Alpha Chapter of the society is involved with both the local Baltimore community as well as with Hopkins students to promote the pursuit of careers in healthcare.

We organize events ranging from lectures with guest speakers from across the Johns Hopkins Institutions, to special activities with medical students, to workshops on the medical school admissions process, as well as community service events at the medical campus and in the Baltimore community.

The main event that we organize is the Conversations in Medicine Lecture Series that is open to the entire Hopkins community, which takes place throughout the year. The society generally admits rising juniors and seniors who are interested in the medical profession.

Members are unique and accomplished in academics, research, community service, and other extra-curricular activities.

For the past few years AED has partnered with People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment transitional housing facilities located around Penn Station to create an educational workshop series for Baltimore’s homeless residents.

Topics include sexual health education, alcohol and drug abuse, and maximizing nutrition. In addition, we bring healthy snacks and meals for the residents to supplement our presentation.

The presentations are engaging and interactive, with the residents responding positively with questions and willingness to share their own experiences.

The Kennedy Krieger Institute focuses on improving the lives of children and young adults with pediatric developmental disabilities, or disorders of the brain, spinal cord and musculoskeletal system.

Because these patients are oftentimes undergoing difficult treatments, they can be away from their schools, friends, and homes for extended periods of time. AED members visit children at KKI at the playroom and plan therapeutic recreation activities.

We also plan seasonal events such as making cards or organizing donations.

AED annually hosts a Spring Blood Drive to support the American Red Cross. We invite all Hopkins students, staff, and faculty to join us in saving lives. Every two seconds someone in the U.S.

is in need of a blood donation as they are essential for surgeries, medical treatments, and chronic illnesses. AED appreciates this opportunity to raise awareness about blood donation and looks forward to contributing to the U.S.

blood supply with the Red Cross.

Conversations in Medicine Symposium invites both world-renowned and local health care professionals to participate in a medically focused lecture series at Johns Hopkins University.

This lecture series links the divisions of the Johns Hopkins University and members of the Baltimore community by initiating dialogue among students, the community at large, and healthcare professionals about the realities of medicine – both in an urban environment and in a broader, global context.

Ms. Kelli Johnson is the Director of the Office of Pre-Professional Advising at Johns Hopkins. She has previously worked as assistant director for career services at NYU School of Law and then as assistant dean and director of NYU's pre-professional advising center. Please visit the pre-prof website for more information.

Dr. Yang is a professor of Surgery and Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is an attending physician at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and at The Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. His research interests include molecular markers for early diagnosis of lung cancer and molecular biology of mesothelioma among other topics.

I'm a third year medical student at Hopkins! I love dancing, filmmaking and college football. I grew up in Alabama and went to undergrad at Vanderbilt University. I love mentoring future generations of medical students and love answering any and all questions about medicine.

Alpha Epsilon Delta Health Preprofessional Honor Society

Source: https://aed.johnshopkins.edu/

Preventing Dental Decay: A Guide for Salivary Hypofunction Patients

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

A handout compiled by:
Alan Baer, MD; Athena Papas, DMD, PhD; Mabi Singh, DMD, MS; James J. Sciubba, DMD, PhD

Diet

Eat sugary foods only during a regular meal. Eliminate dietary sugar (e.g., sucrose, glucose, and fructose) intake between meals, both in terms of snacks and beverages.  Purchase “sugar-free” snacks and candies (not “sugarless,” which often contain “less” sugar rather than no sugar!).

  These sugar-free snacks contain sweetening agents that do not cause dental caries, such as xylitol, sorbitol, saccharin, aspartame, or sucralose.

  There is evidence that the use of a xylitol-containing gum or candy four to five times a day for 5 minutes after meals and snacks can reduce caries-producing bacteria.

Do not sip on carbonated beverages (e.g. a can of soda) between meals. The acidity of the beverage cannot be buffered without food and this prolonged fermentable carbohydrate and acidity in the mouth promotes dental decay. Should you drink, drink quickly (including juices). Try to consume juices that are fortified with calcium and fluoride and rinse with water afterwards.

Avoid alcohol and caffeine since these beverages are acidic and can promote caries. Stop smoking since it can aggravate dryness of the mouth.

Dental Care

Brush and floss regularly and use fluoride daily. Your teeth should be cleansed at least twice daily using a soft bristled electric toothbrush and mildly flavored (avoid strong minty flavor) low-abrasive toothpaste. Choose “dry mouth” toothpastes.

They do not contain sodium lauryl sulfate, a chemical in most regular toothpastes which may contribute to the formation of canker sores. Avoid whitening toothpastes or smokers toothpaste when using regular toothpaste (since these contain abrasives).

Floss between all adjoining teeth at least once daily to adequately remove dental plaque. Carry a travel toothbrush and toothpaste with you to work and brush after meals and snacks.

Do not brush immediately after consuming acidic beverages or food (lot of food and fruits, including salad dressings, are acidic). Instead rinse mouth with plain water or low fluoride containing rinse (e.g.

ACT) and brush after half an hour.

If you are at low-to-moderate risk of caries, you should use a 0.05% sodium fluoride mouth rinse (available over the counter, such as ACT or Colgate Fluorigard) for 1-2 min. daily, before sleep. Hold the sodium fluoride rinse in your mouth for at least one minute before expectorating.

If you are at high risk of caries, your dentist or physician should prescribe 1.1% neutral sodium fluoride toothpaste (such as Prevident 5000 or SF 5000) to be used once daily in place of your regular toothpaste.

Prescription fluoride toothpastes can be applied with a toothbrush and left in place for two to three minutes before expectorating. Do not swallow the prescription fluoride toothpaste.  No food or beverage should be consumed for at least 30 minutes after fluoride application.

 Alternatives include fluoride gels and foams, which are applied through the use of custom-fitted plastic mouth trays (made by your dentist). The tray is held in the mouth by biting.

Application generally takes about four minutes, and you should not rinse, eat, smoke, or drink for at least 30 minutes after application. It is easiest to use these trays before bed each night.

Your dentist may opt to give you fluoride treatments at your dental office visits, using a high-concentration fluoride gel, foam or varnish.  These applications can be repeated every 3-6 months .

In addition to fluoride, calcium has a remineralizing effect on dental enamel. Several agents deliver calcium and phosphate to the tooth surface to help reverse demineralized areas.  These are particularly good to use if you have begun to develop incipient caries or white spot lesions on your teeth.

There are currently three types of calcium remineralizing agents on the market.

  1. Calcium phosphopeptide and amorphous calcium phosphate (Recaldent®; GC MI Paste with Recaldent® and fluoride MI Paste Plus, Trident gum with Recaldent®)
  2. Calcium sodium phosphosilicate (Novamin®; Dr. Collins Restore and Remineralizing Toothpaste)
  3. Amorphous calcium phosphate (liquid calcium in Arm and Hammer Enamel Care Toothpaste)

These products vary in their application. The MI paste Plus is applied in the evening after brushing with a fluoride toothpaste. A generous layer is applied to the tooth surfaces (either with a cotton swab, gloved finger, or custom tray) and left on for 3 minutes.  The Arm and Hammer and Dr. Collins’ products are used in lieu of regular toothpastes.

Your dentist may also prescribe mouth rinses that can reduce oral discomfort and the formation of dental caries. These include rinses that elevate the pH of your oral cavity (e.g baking soda rinses or Carifree spray), reduce the concentration of bacteria and candida (e.g. chlorhexidine), or soothe the lining of your mouth (e. g. supersaturated calcium phosphate).

The frequency of dental visits depends on your risk of dental caries and may require visits every 3 months. Dental X-rays may also be required more often if you are at higher risk of dental carious lesions.

Denture Care

Take your dentures out before going to sleep and soak them overnight. Acrylic appliances should be soaked in a sodium hypochlorite solution, and metal dentures should be soaked in chlorhexidine.

If you have candida, your dentures should be soaked overnight in Nystatin.

Stimulation of Saliva Flow

Increasing salivary flow helps to retard dental decay. This can be achieved by chewing sugar-free gum, sucking on lozenges (e.g. Numoisyn and Salese) or sugar-free candies, or taking certain medications.

Snacking on carrots or celery may also help. Products that contain xylitol can help reduce the risk for dental decay (e.g. Numoisyn and Salese lozenges, Biotene gum, diabetic candies).

 Pilocarpine (Salagen) and cevimeline (Evoxac) are prescription medications that stimulate saliva production.

Minimize the use of medications that can cause a dry mouth.

Many of these are prescription medications (such as anti-depressants, muscle relaxants, and anti-spasmodics for overactive bladders and bowel cramps).

Talk with your physician as to whether these types of medications can be discontinued. Some over-the-counter medications can also cause a dry mouth, such as anti-histamines and decongestants.

Salivary Substitutes

Artificial saliva or saliva substitutes can be used to replace moisture and lubricate the mouth. These substitutes are available commercially and come in a variety of formulations including solutions, sprays, gels and lozenges.

In general, they contain an agent to increase viscosity, such as carboxymethylcellulose or hydroxyethylcellulose, minerals such as calcium and phosphate ions and fluoride, preservatives such as methyl- or propylparaben, and flavoring and related agents.

Oral Candidiasis

Patients with a dry mouth are at risk for oral candidiasis, particularly the erythematous form. Signs of this include painful fissures at the labial commissures (i.e. corners of your mouth), burning mouth, and sore red mouth (especially the tongue). This requires treatment with an antifungal agent (such as nystatin or clotrimazole).

  Most of the prescription products used for oral candidiasis contain lactose and other sugars that can aggravate the formation of dental caries if used repeatedly. Thus, your physician may choose to prescribe a vaginal nystatin tablet for use in the mouth, a specially formulated buccal tablet (e.g.

Oravig), or a troche compounded by a pharmacy with artificial sweeteners.

Source: https://www.hopkinssjogrens.org/disease-information/treatment/preventing-dental-decay/

Dining – Student Life – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Healthy Snack Recipes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Home > Student Life > Dining

There are a variety of food options both on- and off-campus.

Daily Grind

Located on the 2nd floor of the Bloomberg School Wolfe Street buildingOffers coffee, specialty coffee, breakfast, lunch and snacks

7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday

Garden Plate

Located on the 9th floor of the Bloomberg School Wolfe Street buildingOffers breakfast, lunch and snacks8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday

Vending machines available 24 hours

Hampton House Café

Located on the 1st floor of Hampton HouseOffers breakfast and lunch

7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday

Jay’s School of Nursing Café

Located on the 1st floor of the School of NursingOffers breakfast, lunch and snacks7:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday

7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Friday

Balducci's (Hospital)

Located on the 1st floor of the hospitalOffers breakfast, lunch and dinner5 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday

6 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday

Cobblestone Cafe (Hospital)

Located on the 1st floor of the hospitalCafeteria and food court offering breakfast, lunch and dinner. Vendors include Baja Fresh, Einstein Bros Bagels, Flamer's Charbroiled Grill, Noble Roman's, & Subway6:15 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Daily

Vending machines available 24 hours

Grille 601 (Hospital)

Located on the plaza level of the Outpatient CenterOffers upscale breakfast and lunch

7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday

Salad Creations (Hospital)

Located in the Monument Street corridor of the JH HospitalOffers chopped salads and wraps for lunch and dinner10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday

10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday

Atwaters

Located on the corner of North Wolfe and AshlandOffers breakfast, lunch and dinner

8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Monday through Friday

Burger King

Located on East Monument StreetOffers breakfast, lunch and dinner

Daily

Dino's

Located on corner of Orleans and WashingtonOffers lunch and dinner11 a.m. to 2 a.m., Monday and Thursday11 a.m. to 3 a.m., Friday and Saturday

12 pm to 9 p.m., Sunday

Mama Mia's

Located on North Broadway, across from Hampton HouseOffers breakfast, lunch and dinner6 a.m. to 2 a.m., Monday through Friday

6 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday

Northeast Market

Located on East Monument StreetOffers breakfast, lunch, dinner and other items. Vendors sell produce, deli sandwiches, seafood, pizza, and more.

7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday

Sushi Ninja

Located on East Monument StreetOffers lunch and dinner

Monday through Friday

Taste of China

Located on East Monument StreetOffers lunch and dinner

10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Friday

Source: https://www.jhsph.edu/student-life/dining/