How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses

Contents
  1. Causes of Lupus
  2. Genes Associated with Lupus
  3. MHC Genes
  4. Other Genes
  5. Hormones and Environmental Factors
  6. Sources
  7. Methotrexate (MTX)
  8. What are the possible side-effects of MTX?
  9. What can I do to help prevent the potential side-effects from MTX?
  10. How does MTX work?
  11. Is MTX “chemotherapy”?
  12. Will I be very sick patients who are on “chemo” for cancer treatment?
  13. Will I lose my hair?
  14. In what forms is MTX available?
  15. When should I take MTX?
  16. How long will I be on MTX?
  17. Are there any reasons why I should not be on MTX?
  18. Can I have children when on MTX?
  19. Can I consume alcohol while on MTX?
  20. Is there anything that my doctor at home needs to check on?
  21. Does my white blood cell (WBC) count affect my treatment?
  22. Should I get the flu vaccine?
  23. Should I get the pneumococcal vaccine?
  24. What can I do to make sure that my WBC count isn’t too low?
  25. Do I need to take an antibiotic?
  26. What does it really cost to attend Johns Hopkins University?
  27. What Is the List Price of Attending Hopkins?
  28. Financial Aid Net Price
  29. Merit Aid Net Price
  30. Average Loans/Debt for Hopkins Students
  31. Other Ways to Save During College
  32. Expected Outcomes For Hopkins Graduates
  33. Cost of Living Index
  34. Average Apartment Costs
  35. Minimum Wage and Salary Information in Maryland
  36. Family Programs – JHU Human Resources
  37. Johns Hopkins Hospital
  38. Housing for Adult Cancer Patients and Families
  39. Short-Term Housing
  40. Four Seasons Hotel
  41. Inn at Henderson's Wharf Hotel
  42. Inn at the Black Olive
  43. The Ivy Hotel
  44. Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards
  45. Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel
  46. Courtyard Marriott Inner Harbor 
  47. Hilton Garden Inn Baltimore Inner Harbor
  48. Homewood Suites
  49. Hotel Monaco
  50. Hyatt Regency Baltimore
  51. Pier 5 Hotel
  52. Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
  53. Residence Inn Baltimore Downtown
  54. Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Hotel
  55. Admiral Fell Inn
  56. Brookshire Suites
  57. DoubleTree by Hilton – BWI Airport
  58. Embassy Suites by Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor
  59. Embassy Suites Baltimore (at BWI Airport)
  60. Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott
  61. Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott White Marsh
  62. Hampton Inn Baltimore Downtown Convention Center
  63. Hampton Inn & Suites Inner Harbor
  64. Hampton Inn White Marsh
  65. Hilton Garden Inn White Marsh
  66. Holiday Inn Inner Harbor
  67. Home2 Suites by Hilton
  68. Home2 Suites White Marsh
  69. Homewood Suites by Hilton–BWI Airport
  70. Hotel Indigo
  71. Hyatt Place Baltimore Inner Harbor
  72. Hyatt Place BWI
  73. Inn at the Colonnade (Hilton) Baltimore
  74. Lord Baltimore Hotel
  75. Mt. Washington Conference Center
  76. Radisson Cross Keys
  77. Residence Inn Baltimore White Marsh
  78. Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel
  79. TownePlace Suites by Marriott Baltimore BWI Airport
  80. The Westin – BWI Airport
  81. Sheraton – BWI Airport
  82. Spring Hill Suites Inner Harbor
  83. Best Western Plus Hotel & Conference Center
  84. Country Inn & Suites
  85. Holiday Inn Express Baltimore at the Stadiums
  86. Holiday Inn Express Baltimore Downtown
  87. Holiday Inn Timonium
  88. La Quinta Inn Baltimore North
  89. Sleep Inn & Suites Downtown Inner Harbor
  90. Towson University Marriott Conference Hotel

Causes of Lupus

How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Lupus is caused by a complex interplay of genes, hormones, and environmental factors. When patients first present signs of lupus, they are often asked whether they have a family member—a mother, aunt, sister, or other relative—with lupus or another autoimmune condition.

  Researchers were first drawn to the link between genes and lupus because of the clustering of lupus in families and the increased prevalence of the disease among certain ethnic groups.

For example, the risk for development of lupus in siblings of individuals with the disease is about 20 times higher than that of the general population.

In addition, even healthy family members of people with lupus are more ly to test positive in several lupus-related medical tests, including ANAs and the false-positive test for syphilis.

However, the presence of genes predisposing a person to lupus does not necessarily mean that the individual will develop the disease. While researchers are confident that lupus is caused by both genes and environmental triggers, they cannot determine which factor sets the disease in motion or how precisely these two elements interact. Research into both areas seeks to draw light upon this subject.

Genes Associated with Lupus

Our knowledge of the genes associated with lupus and other autoimmune diseases is growing, but certain genes have been identified that provide insight into an individual’s chance of developing lupus.

MHC Genes

MHC class II and III represent two families of genes known to be associated with lupus. Major histocompatability complex (MHC) genes help to shape your immune response by coding for proteins that function in response to invaders (antigens).

The strength of the association of MHC II genes with lupus varies by ethnicity. MHC III genes code for components of the complement system, a group of proteins that interact to clear immune complexes and affect your body’s inflammatory response.

Specifically, lupus involves defects of the genes for complement proteins C4 and C2.

Other Genes

Other genes have also been associated with the development of lupus. Among these are genes that code for variants of opsonins, molecules that make it easier for cells in your immune response to initiate certain steps.

[Specifically, opsonins are involved in the facilitation of phagocytosis, the process in which cells called macrophages swallow antibodies carrying invading particles (antigens).

] The specific opsonins involved are two proteins called mannose binding protein and C-reactive protein.

Genes that code for complement receptors and antibody receptors are also known to be associated with lupus. These receptors are responsible for detecting and binding to pathogens in the body.

In addition, genes for cytokines, molecules that function as signaling molecules in your immune system, have also been implicated in the association with lupus.

Specifically, researchers have focused on cytokines called tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10).

Genes that code for molecules called Fcγ-receptors that function to “catch” antibodies carrying antigens also have been linked to lupus nephritis (lupus affecting the kidneys). Specifically, researchers have targeted variants of this gene that cause these receptors to function poorly, causing inefficient clearance of immune system cells from the body.

Hormones and Environmental Factors

Women are 9 times more ly than men to develop lupus. This phenomenon can be explained by sex hormones and the resulting relative strengths of the female and male immune systems. The female body generates and uses larger quantities of estrogen, while the male body relies on hormones called androgens.

Estrogen is known to be an “immunoenhancing” hormone, which means that women have stronger immune systems than men. For this reason, the incidence of autoimmune diseases is generally higher in women than in men.

Such an observation make sense in light of the evolutionary need for women to survive to nurture their children.

In addition, certain environmental factors have been linked to the development of lupus. These environmental contributors are difficult to isolate, but researchers have established links between lupus and a variety of toxins, such as cigarette smoke, silica, and mercury.

Infectious disease agents such as the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV, which causes mononucleosis or “mono”), herpes zoster virus (the virus that causes shingles), and cytomegalovirus have also been implicated.

Certain drugs can cause lupus- syndrome and exposure to ultraviolet light and stress are known to aggravate lupus symptoms, but none of these factors have been identified as direct causes of the disease.

Sources

  • Miller, Frederick W., and Glinda S. Cooper. “Environmental Aspects of Lupus.” Dubois’ Lupus Erythematosus. Ed. Daniel J. Wallace and Bevra Hannahs Hahn. 7th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007. 21-33.
  • Salmon, Jane E., and Robert P. Kimberly. “Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.” Hospital for Special Surgery Manual of Rheumatology and Outpatient Orthopedic Disorders: Diagnosis and Therapy. 5th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. 221-38.
  • Tsao, Betty P. and Hui Wu. “The Genetics of Human Lupus.” Dubois’ Lupus Erythematosus. Ed. Daniel J. Wallace and Bevra Hannahs Hahn. 7th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007. 54-81.
  • Wallace, Daniel J. The Lupus Book: A Guide for Patients and Their Families. 1st ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1995. 37-45.

Source: https://www.hopkinslupus.org/lupus-info/lupus/

Methotrexate (MTX)

How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Methotrexate (MTX) is used to treat forms of vasculitis which, although serious, do not require therapy with cyclophosphamide. MTX often helps patients avoid cyclophosphamide and decreases patients’ needs for steroids. Specific forms of vasculitis treated with MTX include Wegener’s granuloma t o s i s , Microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Behcet’s disease, and others.

The decision to recommend MTX is an important one. At the Vasculitis Center, we prescribe MTX when a patient’s disease needs to be controlled or to keep a patient from relapsing.

You need to be aware of these possible side-effects. You also need to understand what you and your doctors should do in order to monitor your condition while you are on MTX. We present our approach to the use of MTX in a format that includes frequently asked questions from Vasculitis Center patients. We ask that you read this information carefully and share it with your other doctors.

What are the possible side-effects of MTX?

MTX is a serious medicine we use to treat vasculitis. Without it, many forms of vasculitis would cause longer courses of illness and greater damage. But the effectiveness of MTX has certain trade-offs; these relate to its possible side-effects:

  • A small number of patients will have some nausea or develop a mouth ulcer.
  • Pneumonitis (inflammation in the lung), which mimics pneumonia, with cough and fever. Pneumonitis can occur at anytime after MTX is started or after patients have been on the medication for several years.
  • Liver problems that can progress to scarring or cirrhosis.
  • Anemia (low red blood cell count), which may cause fatigue.
  • Thrombocytopenia (low platelets), which leads to a higher risk of bleeding.
  • Leukopenia (low white blood cell count), which may increase the risk of infections.
  • A slightly increased risk of developing lymphoma, a type of cancer, after taking MTX. This risk remains elevated for several years after the last MTX dose.

Because of these potential side-effects, we only use MTX when it is needed to control your vasculitis.

What can I do to help prevent the potential side-effects from MTX?

The following steps are essential:

  • Get a blood test every 4-6 weeks.
  • Take 1-mg of folic acid (a vitamin) every morning. This will help reduce the chance of developing mouth ulcers.
  • Follow up at the Vasculitis Center as instructed.
  • Keep in close touch with your primary care provider.

How does MTX work?

MTX works by dampening the inflammatory process associated with active vasculitis. The aim of using MTX is to push the disease into remission (inactivity) as soon as possible, before the inflammation causes permanent organ damage.

Is MTX “chemotherapy”?

Not in the sense that cancer drugs are chemotherapy. MTX was developed initially to treat cancer. However, the doses of this medication used in the treatment of vasculitis are far lower than those used to treat cancer.

Will I be very sick patients who are on “chemo” for cancer treatment?

In cancer patients, MTX is used in extremely high doses that are administered intravenously. True chemotherapy is often associated with nausea and vomiting in the days after it is given.

However, in the doses of MTX that we use to treat vasculitis, the medication does not cause the side-effects of severe nausea and vomiting that patients on cancer chemotherapy often get.

Some patients experience mild stomach upset, but severe nausea is very unusual.

Will I lose my hair?

Your hair may thin somewhat, but patients on MTX almost never have major hair loss. Hair usually returns gradually after MTX is discontinued, although it may require some months.

In what forms is MTX available?

MTX can be administered in tablet, liquid, or injectable form. It is usually taken once a week. Generic MTX comes in 2.5-mg tablets. Liquid MTX is the least expensive form.

When should I take MTX?

MTX can be taken any time of day. It does not have to be taken first thing in the morning as cyclophosphamide and prednisone do.

How long will I be on MTX?

This depends largely on the type and severity of vasculitis. MTX is typically used for at least 1 year. Some patients will remain on MTX because they tolerate the medicine so well and need it to control their disease.

Are there any reasons why I should not be on MTX?

Yes. You should not take MTX if you have moderate to severe kidney disease. Please consult the Vasculitis Center before starting MTX if there are any questions regarding the health of your kidneys.

Can I have children when on MTX?

There may be harmful effects on the fetus if you conceive a child while on MTX. Both men and woman should use an effective form of birth control while either partner is taking this medication.

MTX is an “abortifacient”, meaning that there is a high lihood of pregnancy loss if a woman takes MTX while pregnant. Men should not attempt to conceive until three months after stopping MTX.

Women should not attempt to conceive until one full menstrual cycle has passed after stopping MTX.

Can I consume alcohol while on MTX?

You should minimize the use of alcohol while being treated with MTX. This medication, many medications, has the potential to cause harm to your liver.

During your treatment, you should consume little to no alcohol in order to decrease the risk of liver damage. “Liver function tests” are blood tests used to monitor the liver while patients are on MTX.

Please discuss the use of alcohol with your Vasculitis clinician.

Is there anything that my doctor at home needs to check on?

Your primary care provider or local rheumatologist should arrange for your regular blood and urine tests and keep an eye on these results.

If you have these tests performed outside of the Johns Hopkins System please have a copy of these results faxed to us at 410-550-6830.

Between visits to the Vasculitis Center, it is crucial to have regular check-ups with your providers close to home.

Does my white blood cell (WBC) count affect my treatment?

WBCs are important in the fight against infection. Remember that one of the possible side effects of MTX is lowering your WBC count. If your count goes below 4,000/mm3, MTX is stopped for 10 days. Once the WBC count is greater than 4,000/mm3, MTX can be restarted at a lower dose.

Should I get the flu vaccine?

Yes. The flu (influenza) vaccine is recommended every year. Patients on MTX should be especially mindful of getting flu shots annually.

Should I get the pneumococcal vaccine?

Yes. The “pneumovax” shot helps protect against pneumonia for 5-10 years.

What can I do to make sure that my WBC count isn’t too low?

Get blood tests as ordered ― every 4-6 weeks, or more often if your WBC count has been low. Remember: the goal is to keep your WBC count above 4,000/mm3.

Do I need to take an antibiotic?

Possibly. Depending on how much medication you take to control your condition. Usually, the Vasculitis Center will start you on Bactrim® (single-strength form) if you need this. Regardless, you should take folic acid daily and see your doctor when you “catch a cold” or don’t feel well.

Source: https://www.hopkinsvasculitis.org/vasculitis-treatments/methotrexate-mtx/

What does it really cost to attend Johns Hopkins University?

How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Is your child considering attending Johns Hopkins University? The country’s first research university, Hopkins has a stellar reputation and boasts alumni success in a number of fields, from medicine to international relations.

As with many top-ranking colleges and universities, the high cost of attendance at Hopkins may seem overwhelming. However, it’s important to understand that the list price is unly to be your actual cost of attendance. Your net cost, the actual out-of-pocket cost, will depend on the financial aid you receive.

Among government aid (federal, state, and local), institutional aid, and merit scholarships, your net cost is ly to be far lower than Hopkins’ list price, depending, of course, on your family’s income and financial situation.

So, what can you expect to pay if your child decides to attend Hopkins? We’ll break down the costs, including the cost of living in Baltimore and expected earnings for graduates.

Want to learn what Johns Hopkins University will actually cost you your income? And how long your application to the school should take? Here’s what every student considering Johns Hopkins University needs to know.

What Is the List Price of Attending Hopkins?

The list price of attendance, including tuition, room, and board, for Hopkins is $67,650. The price does not vary for in- and out-of-state students, since the university is private.

Typically, families who earn above $175,000 annually pay the list price. Students who are in the very top tier of accepted students may receive merit aid.

Financial Aid Net Price

Students who receive financial aid and no merit scholarships pay a net cost of $58,502 on average. Remember that financial aid packages will vary considerably family incomes. The average net prices for different income brackets are:

Family Income Average Net Price
$0-$30,000 $12,297*
$30,001-$48,000 $7,096
$48,001-$75,000 $14,488
$75,001-$110,000 $27,600
Over $110,000 $44,393

* Note: Many low-income families receive Pell Grants, offsetting accounting for the higher cost compared with the next income bracket.

Merit Aid Net Price

Only 2.8 percent of students who do not receive need-based aid receive merit aid. The average merit award for students without need is $925. So, for students who do not qualify for need-based aid but do receive merit aid, the average net price for attending Hopkins is $66,725.

Among over 1,000 schools Collegevine analyzed for merit aid generosity, Hopkins ranks 776th.

Average Loans/Debt for Hopkins Students

Sixty-four percent of Hopkins students take out student loans, with an average federal student loan of $4,062. Un scholarships, work-study, grants, and some other parts of financial aid packages, loans must be repaid according to a certain time table after students graduate.

Other Ways to Save During College

Even with financial aid, college can be expensive. Still, there are plenty of ways to cut costs and save money. Some Hopkins students work part-time jobs during the school year or breaks.

Your child can also look into outside merit scholarships, which can supplement financial aid packages and institutional merit awards.

Do read the rules carefully to determine whether a particular scholarship will affect your child’s overall financial aid package.

Hopkins does not award scholarship money for National Merit Scholars beyond the Scholarship prize of $2,500. However, it does award several other merit-based scholarships for select students. Learn more about these and need-based scholarships.

Expected Outcomes For Hopkins Graduates

Backed by a strong education and prestigious degree, Hopkins students and graduates are primed to succeed. Ninety-one percent of students graduate within six years, and alumni average $73,200 annually after 10 years.

Cost of Living Index

The cost of living index for Baltimore is 96.8, meaning it is about 3.2 percent lower than the national average. Students will ly find that the city is affordable and provides plenty of options for living, working, and entertainment within walking distance of Homewood Campus.

Average Apartment Costs

While all first- and second-year students are required to live on campus at Hopkins, most upperclassmen live off campus.

The average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Baltimore is $1,342 per month and $1,632 for a two-bedroom apartment.

Students may be able to find even more affordable apartments in Charles Village, where Hopkins is located, because the area caters to undergraduates and graduates.

Upperclassmen seeking off-campus housing can consult the Off-Campus Housing Office, which provides resources and assists students with finding apartments near Homewood Campus.

Minimum Wage and Salary Information in Maryland

The minimum wage in Maryland is $10.10/hour. In the Baltimore-Columbia-Towson Metropolitan Statistical Area, the mean wage for hourly workers was $27.12 in 2017, 11 percent higher than the national average, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It’s important to keep in mind that this average accounts for a wide range of occupations, not just entry-level positions.

Does your teen want access to expert college guidance — for free? When they create their free CollegeVine account, they will find out their real admissions chances, build a best-fit school list, learn how to improve their profile, and get their questions answered by experts and peers—all for free. Encourage them to sign up for their CollegeVine account today to get a boost on their college journey.

We'll send you information to help you throughout the college admissions process.

Source: https://blog.collegevine.com/what-does-it-really-cost-to-attend-johns-hopkins-university/

Family Programs – JHU Human Resources

How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses | Johns Hopkins Medicine
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Child Care Information & FAQ's

How do I reach the Family Programs team at JHU if I need help?
The JHU Family Support Services team is maintaining a list of up-to-date childcare resources during this crisis. You can reach them through the Benefits Service Center at 410-516-2000 or by email at Benefits@jhu.edu.

Are the JHU partner childcare centers staying open?
Governor Hogan issued an executive order requiring that all child care centers in Maryland be closed unless they are providing care for essential workers.

The Johns Hopkins Child Care and Early Learning Center at East Baltimore, Weinberg Early Childhood Center, and Homewood Early Learning Center are open for essential workers only.

Even if you are already enrolled, you must fill out an application to enroll during this emergency period.

My child’s school has closed but JHU is open, and I need childcare. What do I do?
You are expected to work your normal schedule and follow JHU’s normal leave policies. Work with your manager to determine whether your position is eligible and appropriate for Workplace Flexibility.

Please refer to the Sick and Safe Leave policy and JHU’s general Sick Leave policy. Also, FMLA entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a 12-month period for specified family and medical reasons. For specific questions regarding leave, contact HR Business Services at 443-997-2157 or HRBusinessServices@jhu.edu.

There is state-supported school age and early childhood care available for hospital health care workers.

Contact the Maryland Family Network, and a LOCATE specialist can refer you to child care providers who are accepting essential employees’ children.

Request service in the LOCATE: Child Care Registration Form, or call 1-800-999-0120, option 2. The State of Maryland website has additional information.

Plus, JHU provides all employees with 20 days (through June 30, 2020) of backup care through Care.com. You also receive a free premium Care.com membership, which allows you to perform self-directed searches for a variety of caregiving needs. You must register through JHU’s portal at or call 855-781-1303.

JHU provides support programs for all employees and their families through mySupport. You can reach mySupport 24/7, 365 at 443-997-7000 or online. For online access, the username is JHU and the password is JHU.

Are nannies, elder care workers, and backup childcare providers considered essential workers?
Child care and other types of “residential services” are considered essential.

 This means that a nanny, babysitter, or other type of caretaker can travel from one house to another and from one jurisdiction to another.

Maryland’s Office of Legal Counsel issued specific guidance stating that people taking care of children, seniors, or those with special needs can continue their work.

In this situation you are the employer for your caregiver. We suggest that you provide your caregiver with a letter to carry on public transportation or in the car. The suggested content for the letter is:

  • The name and address of the employee.
  • The name and address of the employer (your name and home address).
  • The nature of the employee’s work.
  • A brief statement of your work (attach your essential employee letter from Hopkins if you have one).
  • A signature and contact information for yourself.

Please remember that you are the employer for in-home caregivers, even if they have been hired through an agency such as care.com. The State of Maryland website provides exact guidance.

Part II of the panel discussion will keep the conversation going and allow panelists to answer more of the questions you may have.

Whether you’re having a baby, raising a child, or caring for an aging relative, we have resources for you, from lactation support, to adoption assistance, to help finding—and paying for—child care and eldercare.

Use the links below to find benefits and programs that fit your needs. And remember, our mySupport program can also help with a variety of issues, including finding child care or eldercare.

Be sure to also check out our LifeMart employee discount program. LifeMart offers discounts on select child care and eldercare services, as well as on other family-friendly services such as meal delivery.

Get ready for that new addition to your family.  The Johns Hopkins Baby Shower provides new and expectant parents with information about available leave policies, lactation support, child care options, and other available resources.

Learn More

Looking for quality child care in Maryland? Find options through our LOCATE: Child Care partnership and receive individual counseling to assess your child care needs and then be matched with available services.

You’ll receive referrals to registered family child care providers and licensed group programs, as well as follow-up assistance until placement is found. LOCATE also provides materials on specialized child care options and services, federal income tax credits for families, and state financial assistance programs.

Our Finding Child Care page also offers links to child care provider networks and services, some of which offer discounted rates to JHU employees.

Learn More

We’ve partnered with Care.com to provide 20 days of backup care per year at a reduced rate that’s your salary. Care.

com prescreens qualified caregivers to help you find in-home backup emergency care for children and adults, or in-center backup care for children. You also receive a free premium Care.

com membership, which allows you to perform self-directed searches for a variety of care-giving needs.

Learn More

Your JHU benefits include two programs that can help offset the cost of child care: child care vouchers and dependent care flexible spending accounts. Our LifeMart employee discount program can also help cut your costs.

Learn More

JHU Child Care Center Partners

JHU partners with three high-quality Baltimore-area child care centers that give admission and wait list priority to JHU employees. We also have relationships with other quality centers that offer wait list priority to our employees.

Learn More

As a parent, you’re responsible for assessing and monitoring the quality of the child care you choose. It’s important—and sometimes stressful—but we’ve got resources that can help, including safety information offered through our partnership with Care.com.

Learn More

Locate and register to use lactation rooms equipped with hospital-grade pumps and other comforts, get tips on successful milk expression after your return to work, and find manager resources, plus information on laws and JHU policies.

Learn More

Family Leave for New Parents

Parents can take paid time off using JHU’s birth recovery leave and parental leave after the birth or adoption of a child younger than 12. For a mother, this can mean up to 10 weeks of paid leave after childbirth (fathers and adoptive parents can get up to four weeks of paid leave).

Learn More

In addition to paid parental leave for parents adopting a child under the age of 12, we offer an Adoption Assistance Plan that can provide up to $15,000 toward eligible adoption costs.

Learn More

Gestational Surrogacy Program

Outside of the Adoption Assistance Plan, we offer a separate gestational surrogacy benefit that can provide up to $15,000 for eligible expenses associated with gestational surrogacy.

Learn More

We have a host of programs that can ease the challenges—emotional, financial, and practical—of caring for an aging adult.

Learn More

Source: https://hr.jhu.edu/benefits-worklife/family-programs/

Johns Hopkins Hospital

How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses | Johns Hopkins Medicine

We understand the challenges of accommodating family members who want to be with you during your stay at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Fortunately, our housing program can help. Here are some points to consider when deciding on the best housing options for your stay in Baltimore:

  • Your health insurance provider may cover local housing during your treatment. Check to see whether you have this type of coverage.
  • As a Johns Hopkins patient or family member, you have access to reduced rates at many local hotels. Contact Guest Services for more information or see our list of options for short-term housing.
  • Consider the special needs of any family members or caretakers who will need housing. If handicapped-accessibility is important, please clarify this when making arrangements.
  • Lower-cost housing often involves a waiting list, meaning reservations cannot be confirmed ahead of time. If you are on a waiting list, be sure to have a back-up plan, such as a local hotel reservation. When making hotel reservations, ask about cancellation policies.
  • Some properties cannot accommodate children, so be sure to inquire if your party includes a child. You may also consider specific housing options for pediatric patients.
  • Some accommodations do not have daily housekeeping services, restaurants, or concierge services, however, these options are typically less expensive than a hotel.
  • If you have hired a caregiver to assist you, a separate room may be required. Some facilities restrict the number of rooms one family can occupy. Be sure to clarify your needs with the individual property before your arrival.

Housing for Adult Cancer Patients and Families

The Hackerman-Patz Patient and Family Pavilion is a “home away from home” for adult cancer patients and their families. The Pavilion is across the street from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building on the main hospital campus.

Comprised of 29 suites and 10 one-bedroom apartments, the Pavilion offers affordable short- and long-term housing for Kimmel Cancer Center patients and their caregivers, and can accommodate other Johns Hopkins patients when space allows.

Outpatients must have a caregiver stay with them, and all guests must be 12 years or older.

Short-Term Housing

Some local hotels offer hotel rooms at a discounted rate – contact Guest Services to request a discounted reservation. The price for a one-night stay ranges from about $80-$160. You may want to view our list of nearby hotels before you call.

Four Seasons Hotel

200 International DriveBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 576-5800

The Four Seasons Hotel is located 1.5 miles from the hospital.

Inn at Henderson's Wharf Hotel

1000 Fell St.Baltimore, MD 21231

T: (410) 522-7777

The Inn at Henderson's Wharf Hotel is located one mile from the hospital.

Inn at the Black Olive

803 S. Caroline St.Baltimore, MD 21231

T: (443) 681-6316

The Inn at the Black Olive is located one mile from the hospital.

The Ivy Hotel

205 E. Biddle St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 514-6500

The Ivy Hotel is located two miles from the hospital. 

Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards

110 S. Eutaw St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 962-0202

Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards is located two miles from the hospital.

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel

700 Aliceanna St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 385-3000

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel is located 1.5 miles from the hospital

Courtyard Marriott Inner Harbor 

1000 Aliceanna St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (443) 923-4000

Courtyard Marriott Inner Harbor is located 1.5 miles from the hospital.

Hilton Garden Inn Baltimore Inner Harbor

625 S. President St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 234-0065

Hilton Garden Inn Baltimore Inner Harbor is located 2.5 miles from the hospital.

Homewood Suites

625 S. President St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 234-0065

Homewood Suites is located 1.5 miles from the hospital.

Hotel Monaco

2 N. Charles St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (443) 692-6170

Hotel Monaco is located two miles from the hospital.

Hyatt Regency Baltimore

300 Light St. Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 528-1234

Hyatt Regency Baltimore is located two miles from the hospital.

Pier 5 Hotel

711 Eastern AvenueBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 539-2000

Pier 5 Hotel is located two miles from the hospital.

Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel

202 E. Pratt St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 547-1200

Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel is located two miles from the hospital.

Residence Inn Baltimore Downtown

17 Light St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 962-1220

Residence Inn Baltimore Downtown is located 1.5 miles from the hospital.

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Hotel

550 Light St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 234-0550

Royal Sonesta Harbor Court Hotel is located two miles from the hospital.

Admiral Fell Inn

888 S. BroadwayBaltimore, MD 21231

T: (410) 522-7377  

Admiral Fell Inn is located one mile from the hospital.

Brookshire Suites

120 E. Lombard St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 625-1300

Brookshire Suites is located two miles from the hospital.

DoubleTree by Hilton – BWI Airport

890 Elkridge Landing RoadLinthicum Heights, MD 21090

T: (410) 859-8400

DoubleTree by Hilton is located 10 miles from the hospital.

Embassy Suites by Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor

222 Street Paul StBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 727-2222

Embassy Suites by Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor is located two miles from the hospital.

Embassy Suites Baltimore (at BWI Airport)

1300 Concourse DriveLinthicum, MD 21090

T: (410) 850-0747

Embassy Suites Baltimore is located nine miles from the hospital.

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott

101 President St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 837-9900

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott is located two miles from the hospital.

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott White Marsh

8477 Cordon WayBaltimore, MD 21236

T: (410) 933-9797

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott White Marsh is located 11.5 miles from the hospital.

Hampton Inn Baltimore Downtown Convention Center

550 Washington Blvd.Baltimore, MD 21230

T: (410) 685-5000

Hampton Inn Baltimore Downtown Convention Center is located 2.5 miles from the hospital.

Hampton Inn & Suites Inner Harbor

131 E Redwood St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 539-7888

Hampton Inn & Suites Inner Harbor is located 1.5 miles from the hospital.

Hampton Inn White Marsh

8225 Town Center DriveBaltimore, MD 21236

T: (410) 931-2200

Hampton Inn White Marsh is located 11 miles from the hospital.

Hilton Garden Inn White Marsh

5015 Cambell Blvd.Baltimore, MD 21236

T: (410) 427-0600

Hilton Garden Inn White Marsh is located 11 miles from the hospital.

Holiday Inn Inner Harbor

301 W. Lombard St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 685-3500

Holiday Inn Inner Harbor is located two miles from the hospital.

Home2 Suites by Hilton

8 E. Pleasant St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 576-1200

Home2 Suites by Hilton is located two miles from the hospital.

Home2 Suites White Marsh

10465 Philadelphia RoadWhite Marsh, MD 21162

T: (410) 933-1010

Home2 Suites White Marsh is located 12 miles from the hospital.

Homewood Suites by Hilton–BWI Airport

1181 Winterson RoadLinthicum, MD 21090

T: (410) 684-6100 ext. 2105

Homewood Suites by Hilton is located nine miles from the hospital.

Hotel Indigo

24 W Franklin St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 625-6200

Hotel Indigo is located one mile from the hospital.

Hyatt Place Baltimore Inner Harbor

511 S. Central AvenueBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 558-1840

Hyatt Place Baltimore Inner Harbor is located one mile from the hospital.

Hyatt Place BWI

940 International DriveLinthicum Heights, MD 21090

T: (410) 859-3366

Hyatt Place BWI is located 11 miles from the hospital.

Inn at the Colonnade (Hilton) Baltimore

4 W. University Pkwy.Baltimore, MD 21218

T: (410) 235-5400

Inn at the Colonnade (Hilton) Baltimore is located six miles from the hospital.

Lord Baltimore Hotel

20 W. Baltimore St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 539-8400

Lord Baltimore Hotel is located 1.8 miles from the hospital.

Mt. Washington Conference Center

5801 Smith AvenueBaltimore, MD 21209

T: (410) 735-7964

Mt. Washington Conference Center is located seven miles from the hospital.

Radisson Cross Keys

5100 Falls RoadBaltimore, MD 21210

T: (410) 532-6900

Radisson Cross Keys is located six miles from the hospital.

Residence Inn Baltimore White Marsh

4980 Mercantile RoadBaltimore, MD 21236

T: (410) 933-9554

Residence Inn Baltimore White Marsh is located 11 miles from the hospital.

Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel

300 S. Charles St.Baltimore, MD 21201

T: (410) 962-8300

Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel is located two miles from the hospital.

TownePlace Suites by Marriott Baltimore BWI Airport

1171 Winterson RoadLinthicum, MD 21090

T: (410) 694-0060

TownePlace Suites by Marriott Baltimore is located nine miles from the hospital.

The Westin – BWI Airport

1100 Old Elkridge Landing RoadLinthicum, MD 21090

T: (443) 577-2300

The Westin is located nine miles from the hospital.

Sheraton – BWI Airport

1100 Old Elkridge Landing RoadLinthicum, MD 21090

T: (443) 577-2100

The Sheraton is located nine miles from the hospital.

Spring Hill Suites Inner Harbor

120 E. Redwood StreetBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 685-1095

Spring Hill Suites Inner Harbor is located two miles the hospital.

Best Western Plus Hotel & Conference Center

5625 O'Donnell St.Baltimore, MD 21224

T: (410) 633-9500

Best Western Plus Hotel & Conference Center is located four miles from the hospital.

Country Inn & Suites

8825 Yellow Brick RoadBaltimore, MD 21237

T: (443) 772-5000

Country Inn & Suites is located eight miles from the hospital.

Holiday Inn Express Baltimore at the Stadiums

1701 Russell St.Baltimore, MD 21230

T:(410) 727-1818

Holiday Inn Express Baltimore at the Stadiums is located three miles from the hospital.

Holiday Inn Express Baltimore Downtown

221 N. Gay St.Baltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 400-8045

Holiday Inn Express Baltimore Downtown is located one mile from the hospital.

Holiday Inn Timonium

9615 Deereco RoadBaltimore, MD 21093

T: (410) 560-1000

Holiday Inn Timonium is located four miles from the hospital.

La Quinta Inn Baltimore North

4 Philadelphia CourtBaltimore, MD 21237

T: (410) 574-8100

La Quinta Inn Baltimore North is located eight miles from the hospital.

Sleep Inn & Suites Downtown Inner Harbor

301 FallswayBaltimore, MD 21202

T: (410) 779-6166

Sleep Inn & Suites Downtown Inner Harbor is located 1.2 miles from the hospital.

Towson University Marriott Conference Hotel

10 W. Burke AvenueTowson, MD 21204

T: (410) 324-8100

Towson University Marriott Conference Hotel is located10 miles from the hospital.

Source: http://julesoflife.org/get-help/locations-of-care/JohnsHopkinsHospital