School-Aged Child Nutrition

JHU Child Care Center Partners – JHU Human Resources

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine
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Looking for a child care center for your little one? We’ve partnered with three area centers that offer admission and wait list priority to Johns Hopkins families.

You may also find employee discounts on select child care providers through our LifeMart employee discount program.

Homewood Early Learning Center

The Homewood Early Learning Center, located at the corner of Wyman Park Drive and Remington Avenue, offers a nurturing, high-quality environment where children have the time and space to develop at their own pace.

Downtown Baltimore Child Care operates the center, which accommodates up to 94 children, ages 10 weeks through preschool, and is open to all, including community members.

Priority admission is available to Johns Hopkins parents.

Homewood ELC

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Early Childhood Center

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Early Childhood Center, also operated by Downtown Baltimore Child Care, is a premier early learning facility whose teachers and staff believe all children deserve the best education from the earliest age.

The product of years of planning by leading child advocates, the state-of-the-art Weinberg ECC, located near the East Baltimore campus, provides developmentally appropriate learning opportunities for children using the latest evidence-based approaches to ensure children start school ready to learn.

The center’s 12-month, full-day operation serves a diverse mixed-income community of children and families who live and/or work in the Eager Park neighborhood and beyond. Priority admission is available to Johns Hopkins parents.

Weinberg ECC

Johns Hopkins Child Care and Early Learning Center (Bright Horizons)

Located on the East Baltimore campus, the Johns Hopkins Child Care and Early Learning Center is designed to serve full-time faculty and staff, full-time day students, house staff, and fellows of the Johns Hopkins University schools of Medicine, Nursing, Public Health; and full-time employees of Johns Hopkins Hospital, Health System, and Bayview Medical Center. The center is open to children ages 6 weeks through preschool for full-time care.

Bright Horizons

The university has taken steps to make sure that cost is not a prohibitive factor for JHU families that are using one of the three centers that are Johns Hopkins partners—the Homewood Early Learning Center, Bright Horizons at the School of Medicine, and the Weinberg Early Childhood Center. In addition to child care vouchers, we now have a pool of scholarship funds that will make sure children from any economic background can join these learning communities.

Although the child care scholarship does not apply to the other centers below, you may use the child care voucher to help with tuition. These centers also offer preferred wait list status for JHU employees:

Downtown Baltimore Child Care Center

Downtown Baltimore Child Care provides early education and child care to a diverse community. Children of university employees receive preferential admission.

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Child Care Center

The Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Child Care Center has 32 spaces for children 2 to 5 years of age. Priority is given to employees of Bayview Medical Center.

Y Preschool at Weinberg

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Y Preschool Center offers priority placement for children ages 2 to 5 of full-time Johns Hopkins University faculty and staff. The Weinberg Y is on East 33rd Street in Waverly, conveniently located near both the Homewood and East Baltimore campuses. Preregister your child to join the wait list.

Source: https://hr.jhu.edu/benefits-worklife/family-programs/jhu-child-care-center-partners/

Less than half of children in the U.S. are flourishing, study finds

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has determined that less than half of school-aged children in the U.S. are flourishing.

The study also found that the children most ly to flourish—across all levels of household income, health status, and exposure to adverse childhood experiences—are those who come from families with higher levels of resilience and connection.

The findings, published in the May issue of Health Affairs, suggest that more emphasis should be placed on programs to promote family resilience and parent-child connection, even as society works to lessen children's adversities poverty and child maltreatment.

“Family resilience and connection were important for flourishing in all children, regardless of their level of adversity,” says study leader Christina D.

Bethell, director of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative and a professor in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Bloomberg School.

“Parent-child connection had a particularly strong association with child flourishing.”

“With only four in 10 U.S. school-age children flourishing, we need population-wide approaches to promoting child flourishing.”

Christina D. Bethell

Director, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative

For their study, Bethell and colleagues used data from the combined 2016 and 2017 National Survey of Children's Health; their conclusions were a nationally representative sample of more than 51,000 school-age children between ages 6 and 17.

Children's parents or guardians answered a series of questions about child flourishing, family resilience and connection, household income (using federal poverty-level guidelines), and whether the child had a chronic condition and special health care needs.

Parents were also asked about the child's exposure to adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, which include a range of experiences associated with trauma and toxic stress in children such as exposure to household substance abuse, serious mental illness, family and neighborhood violence, and loss of a parent through death, incarceration, or divorce.

School-age children were considered to be flourishing if their parents reported that three things were “definitely true” about their children:

  • They were curious and interested in learning new things
  • They work to complete tasks they start
  • They were able to stay calm and in control when faced with a challenge

These qualities contribute to flourishing in adulthood, which is most fundamentally characterized by having a sense of meaning and engagement in life and positive relationships.

Parents also answered questions to assess family resilience and connection, including how families respond when facing problems, how well parents and children share ideas or talk about things that really matter, and how well parents cope with the day-to-day demands of raising children.

The study found that only 40% of U.S. school-age children were flourishing. This ranged from 29.9% to 45.0% across U.S. states. Nearly half of children (48%) lived in families that reported the highest levels of resilience and connection. These children had more than three times greater odds of flourishing compared to the 25.

5% of children living in families reporting the lowest levels of resilience and connection.

A similarly strong association of resilience and connection with flourishing was found across all groups of children, regardless of their level of adversity as assessed by their level of ACEs exposure, exposure to poverty, and presence of a chronic condition and special health care needs.

“With only four in 10 U.S. school-age children flourishing, we need population-wide approaches to promoting child flourishing,” Bethell says. “Especially critical are efforts to foster safe, stable, and nurturing family relationships by encouraging parents to communicate with their children about things that really matter to the child and family.”

Promoting the qualities of flourishing assessed in the study could increase the level of meaning and engagement that children have in school and in their relationships and activities. Evidence-based programs and policies to increase family resilience and connection could increase flourishing in U.S.

children, even as society addresses remediable causes of childhood adversity.

The authors further suggest that the success of such efforts depends on making families and children partners in the process, which itself may promote much-needed improvements in the flourishing of our nation's practitioners of children's health care, social, or educational services.

Source: https://hub.jhu.edu/2019/05/17/child-flourish-resilience-connection/

School-Aged Child Nutrition

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Linkedin Pinterest Healthy Eating for Kids Kids' and Teens' Health

School-age children (ages 6 to 12) need healthy foods and nutritious snacks. They have a consistent but slow rate of growth and usually eat 4 to 5 times a day (including snacks). Many food habits, s, and diss are set during this time.

Family, friends, and the media (especially TV) influence their food choices and eating habits. School-age children are often willing to eat a wider variety of foods than their younger siblings. Eating healthy after-school snacks is important, too, as these snacks may contribute up to one-fourth of the total calorie intake for the day.

School-age children have developed more advanced feeding skills and are able to help with meal preparation. 

Helpful mealtime hints for school-age children

The following are some helpful mealtime hints:

  • Always serve breakfast, even if it has to be “on the run.” Some ideas for a quick, healthy breakfast include:
    • Fruit
    • Milk
    • Bagel
    • Cheese toast
    • Cereal
    • Peanut butter sandwich
  • Take advantage of big appetites after school by serving healthy snacks, such as:

    • Fruit
    • Vegetables and dip
    • Yogurt
    • Turkey or chicken sandwich
    • Cheese and crackers
    • Milk and cereal
  • Set good examples for eating habits.

  • Allow children to help with meal planning and preparation.

  • Serve meals at the table, instead of in front of the television, to avoid distractions.

Getting your child to eat healthfully is a struggle for many parents, especially if you have a picky eater in your family. Picky eaters often bring back unopened lunch boxes or ignore the healthy foods you’ve packed and go straight for the dessert. Learn helpful tips and tricks for outsmarting your picky eater from a Johns Hopkins pediatric dietitian.

The MyPlate icon is a guideline to help you and your child eat a healthy diet. MyPlate can help you and your child eat a variety of foods while encouraging the right amount of calories and fat.

The USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have prepared the plate to guide parents in selecting foods for children age 2 and older.

The MyPlate icon is divided into 5 food group categories, emphasizing the nutritional intake of the following:

  • Grains. Foods that are made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain are grain products. Examples include whole wheat, brown rice, and oatmeal.
  • Vegetables. Vary your vegetables. Choose a variety of colorful vegetables, including dark green, red, and orange vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), and starchy vegetables.
  • Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut up, or pureed.
  • Dairy. Milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Focus on fat-free or low-fat products, as well as those that are high in calcium.
  • Protein. Go lean on protein. Choose low-fat or lean meats and poultry. Vary your protein routine. Choose more fish, nuts, seeds, peas, and beans.

Oils are not a food group, yet some, nut oils, contain essential nutrients and can be included in the diet. Animal fats are solid fats and should be avoided.

Exercise and everyday physical activity should also be included with a healthy dietary plan.

Nutrition and activity tips

Here are tips to follow:

  • Try to control when and where food is eaten by your children by providing regular daily meal times with social interaction and demonstration of healthy eating behaviors.
  • Involve children in the selection and preparation of foods. Teach them to make healthy choices by providing opportunities to select foods their nutritional value.
  • For children in general, reported dietary intakes of the following are low enough to be of concern by the USDA: calcium, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. Select foods with these nutrients when possible.
  • Most Americans need to reduce the number of calories they consume. When it comes to weight control, calories do count. Controlling portion sizes and eating nonprocessed foods helps limit calorie intake and increase nutrients.
  • Parents are encouraged to make recommended serving sizes for children.
  • Parents are encouraged to limit children’s video, television watching, and computer use to less than 2 hours daily and replace the sitting activities with activities that require more movement.
  • Children and adolescents need at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on most days to have good health and fitness and for healthy weight during growth.
  • To prevent dehydration, encourage children to drink fluid regularly during physical activity and to drink several glasses of water or other fluid after the physical activity is completed.

To find more information about the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 and to determine the appropriate dietary recommendations for your child’s age, sex, and physical activity level, visit the Online Resources page for the links to the ChooseMyPlate.gov and 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines sites. Please note that the MyPlate plan is designed for people older than age 2 who do not have chronic health conditions.

Always talk with your child’s health care provider regarding his or her healthy diet and exercise needs.

Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/schoolaged-child-nutrition

Women Infants and Children Program – WIC

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Home > Departments > Population, Family and Reproductive Health > Women Infants and Children Program

tel: 410-614-4848
e-mail: Johns Hopkins WIC

WIC is a federally funded program that provides healthy supplemental foods, nutrition counseling for pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children under age five.

The program has an extraordinary 30-year record of preventing children’s health problems and improving their long-term health, growth and development. WIC scored second highest in customer satisfaction among 30 high impact government programs in a recent survey.

WIC serves over 8.2 million women, infants and children through over 10,000 clinics nationwide.

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and provides:

  • Healthy supplemental foods
  • Nutrition assessment and education
  • Referrals to health and other social services to participants

The prototype for the National WIC Program was designed and piloted at this School and adopted nationally by Congress in 1974.

Johns Hopkins WIC Program

ANDROID

I-PHONE

WIC promotes the health and nutritional well-being of low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infants and children under five years of age living in Baltimore through practice, research and community engagement.

  • The program serves over 10,000 pregnant, breast feeding and post partum women, infants and children up to age 5.
  • Operates in twelve sites, Head Start, Shelters for the homeless and domestically abused women and children in Baltimore.
  • Over 75 percent of all infants participate in the program.
  • Peer counselors provide supportive services to breast feeding women.

21211

Hampden Family Ctr.1104 W. 36th St., 21211410.614.4848

2nd Thursday

21213

Belair/EdisonBaltimore Medical Systems3120 Erdman Ave.410.614.4848

Tuesdays

21215

JAI Medical Center4340 Park Heights Ave.410.664.1413

M,T,TH, F, 2nd & 4th Wednesday

Park West Medical Ctr.3319 W. Belvedere Ave.410.614.4848

1st & 3rd Wednesdays

21217

Dru/Mondawnin Healthy Families2100 Eutaw Place

1st & 3rd Thursdays

Gilmor Homes1515 Vincent Ct.410.614.4848

2nd Wednesday

21223

Adventure Dental & Vision1253 W. Pratt St.410.230.9473

Mondays & Fridays

21224

Eastern Ave3732 Eastern Ave.410.261.0001

M, T, W, TH, F

21225

Cherry Hill Shopping Ctr.634 Cherry Hill Rd.410.354.0162

M,W,TH, F

Judy Ctr. @ Curtis Bay Elementary/Middle School4301 W. Bay Ave.410.614.4848

2nd Monday

21287

Johns Hopkins Hospital600 N. Wolfe St. – Carnegie Building, Rm 267443.287.6594

M,T,W,TH,F

21230

Enoch Pratt Library Brooklyn Branch300 E. Patapsco Ave.410.614.4848

Call for appointment

Judy Ctr. @ Lakeland Elementary/Middle SchoolLakeland STEAM Ctr.2921 Stranden Rd.410.614.4848

Wednesdays

21231

Judy Ctr. @ Commodore Johns Rogers Elementary/Middle School100 N. Chester St.410.614.4848

1st Monday & Tuesday

21239

The Alameda Shopping Ctr.Adventure Dental & Orthodontics5632 The Alameda410.614.4848

1st & 3rd Tuesdays

Hopkins/USDA Participant Research Innovation Laboratory for Enhancing WIC Services (HPRIL)

HPRIL is the laboratory for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health working cooperatively with Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and competitively selected local WIC agencies nationally to explore through innovative and replicable interactive tools how to accurately determine the family characteristics that predict early termination and employ family based interactive tools and social media to retain eligible high risk children ages 1-4 in the WIC program for maximum benefit.

Visit the HPRIL page for more information.

Source: https://www.jhsph.edu/departments/population-family-and-reproductive-health/women-infants-children/

Preschooler Nutrition

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Linkedin Pinterest Babies and Toddlers Health

Preschool-age children (ages 3 to 5) are still developing their eating habits and need encouragement to eat healthy meals and snacks.

These children are eager to learn, especially from other people. They will often imitate eating behaviors of adults.

They need supervision at mealtime as they are still working on chewing and swallowing skills.

The following are some helpful mealtime hints for preschool-age children:

  • Prepare meals, provide regularly scheduled snacks, and limit unplanned eating.
  • Poor behavior at mealtime should not be allowed. Focus on eating, not playing with food, or playing at the dinner table.
  • Running or playing while eating can cause a child to choke. Have your child sit when eating.
  • Keep offering a variety of foods. Have the attitude that, sooner or later, your child will learn to eat almost all foods.
  • Make mealtime as pleasant as possible. Do not put pressure on your child to eat. Do not force your child to “clean” his or her plate. This may lead to overeating, which can cause your child to gain too much weight. Children will be hungry at mealtime if snacks have been limited during the day.
  • Provide examples of healthy eating habits. Preschoolers copy what they see their parents doing. If you have unhealthy eating habits, your child will not learn to eat healthy.

Healthy food choices 

The MyPlate icon is a guideline to help you and your child eat a healthy diet. MyPlate can help you and your child eat a variety of foods while encouraging the right amount of calories and fat.

The USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have prepared food plates to guide parents in selecting foods for children age 2 and older.

The MyPlate icon is divided into 5 food group categories, emphasizing the nutritional intake of the following:

  • Grains. Foods that are made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain are grain products. Examples include whole wheat, brown rice, and oatmeal.
  • Vegetables. Vary your vegetables. Choose a variety of colorful vegetables. These can include dark green, red, and orange vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), and starchy vegetables.
  • Fruits. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut up, or pureed.
  • Dairy. Milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Focus on fat-free or low-fat products, as well as those that are high in calcium.
  • Protein. Go lean on protein. Choose low-fat or lean meats and poultry. Vary your protein routine. Choose more fish, nuts, seeds, peas, and beans.

Oils are not a food group, yet some, nut oils, contain essential nutrients and can be included in the diet. Animal fats, which are solid fats, should be avoided.

Exercise and everyday physical activity should also be included with a healthy dietary plan.

Getting your child to eat healthfully is a struggle for many parents, especially if you have a picky eater in your family. Picky eaters often bring back unopened lunch boxes or ignore the healthy foods you’ve packed and go straight for the dessert. Learn helpful tips and tricks for outsmarting your picky eater from a Johns Hopkins pediatric dietitian.

Here are some tips to follow:

  • Try to control when and where food is eaten by your children by providing regular daily meal times with social interaction and demonstration of healthy eating behaviors.
  • Involve children in the selection and preparation of foods. Teach them to make healthy choices by helping them to select foods their nutritional value.
  • For children in general, reported dietary intakes of the following are low enough to be of concern by the USDA: calcium, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. Select foods with these nutrients when possible.
  • Most Americans need to reduce the number of calories they consume. When it comes to weight control, calories do count. Controlling portion sizes and eating nonprocessed foods helps limit calorie intake and increase nutrients.
  • Parents are encouraged to provide recommended serving sizes for children.
  • Parents are encouraged to limit children’s video, television watching, and computer use to less than 2 hours daily. Replace sitting activities with activities that require more movement.
  • Children and adolescents need at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on most days to have good health and fitness and for healthy weight during growth.
  • To prevent dehydration, encourage children to drink fluid regularly during physical activity and drink several glasses of water or other fluid after the physical activity is completed.

To find more information about the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 and to determine the appropriate dietary recommendations for your child’s age, sex, and physical activity level, visit the Online Resources page for the links to the ChooseMyPlate.gov and 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines sites. Please note that the MyPlate plan is designed for people older than age 2 who do not have chronic health conditions.

Always talk with your child’s health care provider regarding his or her healthy diet and exercise requirements.

Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/preschooler-nutrition

Treat primary complex motor stereotypies at home

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

An instructional, parent-delivered behavioral therapy to help treat primary motor stereotypies in children.

THE JOHNS HOPKINS MOTOR STEREOTYPY BEHAVIORAL THERAPY PROGRAM

Often seen in children who are otherwise developing normally, complex motor stereotypies are rhythmic, purposeless movements of the hands or arms. Made over and over again these behaviors first manifest themselves in early childhood, typically around age 7 and can last well into the teenage years. These movements are divided into two categories, primary and secondary.

With secondary complex motor stereotypies the repetitive movements are associated with autism, sensory abnormalities and other types of developmental conditions. With primary complex motor stereotypies, there are no developmental abnormalities.

Because there appears to be no inciting condition these persistent, troubling movements are often of grave concern to parents worried about their afflicted childrens’ psychosocial development.

Children with primary CMS can often be the focus of social stigmatization, and their daily routines and activities can be disrupted.

And while there are no established drugs or medical treatments, Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a behavioral therapy program for children suffering from primary CMS. The Johns Hopkins Motor Stereotypy Behavioral Therapy Program has been clinically proven to reduce the severity of primary CMS in children from ages 7 to 17.

Developed from studies demonstrating that combined two component therapy can successfully reduce the frequency and severity of these movements, the Johns Hopkins Motor Stereotypy Behavioral Therapy Program is a parent-administered therapy that is safe and effective.

The program consists of an instructional DVD that helps parents teach their children the behavioral modification techniques necessary to reduce CMS movements.

Clinical trials have shown a 15% reduction in SSS Motor, 24% reduction in SSS Impairment and 20% reduction in SLAS scores. In short, these numbers point towards a treatment that can provide significant and measureable relief to patients suffering from a malady for which treatment options are woefully sparse.

Click here to learn more about the Johns Hopkins Motor Stereotypy Behavioral Therapy Program.

LEARN ABOUT THE PROGRAM INNOVATORS

Harvey Singer, MD, focuses on general child neurology with a principal interest in caring for children with movement disorders. Dr.

Singer’s research focuses on clinical problems, such as pediatric movement disorders, Tourette syndrome and motor stereotypies.

He also focuses on therapeutic trials for movement disorders and the identification of genetic biomarkers, and studies of the underlying pathophysiology. He also actively studies autoimmune mechanisms in autism.

Dr. Harvey Singer received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University Medical School. He completed his internship in pediatrics at the University of Illinois Research and Educational Hospital. He completed his residency in pediatric at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital followed by a residency in child neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Richard Waranch, PhD, took his doctoral degree in psychology from the Northeastern University, completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Behavioral Psychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, and is currently an assistant professor in medical psychology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a consultant in neurology at the Sinai Hospital, in Baltimore.

Dr. Warnach was director of the Behavioral Medicine and Biofeedback Clinic, at Johns Hopkins from 1979-1992. Dr.

Waranch specializes in the use of behavioral techniques (biofeedback, relaxation training, behavior modification and cognitive-behavior therapy) for the treatment of psychophysiological and behavioral disorders.

He has authored research articles and book chapters on topics including stress management and the behavioral treatment of pediatric headaches, tics, motor stereotypies, and irritable bowel disorder.

Source: https://www.johnshopkinssolutions.com/treat-primary-complex-motor-stereotypies-at-home/

Long shadow cast by psychiatrist on transgender issues finally recedes at Johns Hopkins

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Paul McHugh, the former chief of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Hospital, helped to end Johns Hopkins’s pathbreaking transgender surgery program nearly 40 years ago.

(Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine)

Nearly four decades after he derailed a pioneering transgender program at Johns Hopkins Hospital with his views on “guilt-ridden homosexual men,” psychiatrist Paul McHugh is seeing his institution come full circle with the resumption of gender-reassignment surgeries.

McHugh, the hospital’s chief of psychiatry from 1975 to 2001, still believes that being transgender is largely a psychological problem, not a biological phenomenon. And with the title of university distinguished service professor at Johns Hopkins Medicine, he continues to wield enormous influence in certain circles and is quoted frequently on gender issues in conservative media.

“I’m not against transgender people,” he said recently, stressing that he is “anxious they get the help they need.” But such help should be psychiatric rather than surgical, he maintains.

Hopkins, however, is moving beyond McHugh. This summer, it will formally open a transgender health service and will resume, after a 38-year hiatus, an accompanying surgical program.

Once at the forefront of ­gender-identity science — and site of the nation’s first “change-of-sex operations,” as the headlines announced in 1966 — Hopkins abruptly halted those surgeries in 1979.

Johns Hopkins Hospital hopes to return to the forefront of transgender medicine with a new transgender health service formally opening this summer. (Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

The main trigger was a study by Jon Meyer, who ran the hospital’s Sexual Behaviors Consultation Unit. In the study, Meyer concluded that although “sex-change” surgery was “subjectively satisfying” for the small sample surveyed, the operations they underwent conferred “no objective advantage in terms of social rehabilitation.”

“With these facts in hand,” McHugh later wrote, “I concluded that Hopkins was fundamentally cooperating with a mental illness.”

Two months later, its gender-identity clinic was shut down.

Many scientists subsequently challenged the methodology behind Meyer’s study, as well as his interpretation of the results, but in the decade that followed, other academic hospitals often cited the research when they discontinued their own transgender surgical programs.

The decision to restart operations initially was made public in July and then repeated in October on the health system’s website in a letter titled “Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Commitment to the LGBT Community.

” The letter stressed “strong and unambiguous” support of the LGBT community and made clear that when “individuals associated with Johns Hopkins exercise the right of expression, they do not speak on behalf of the institution.”

At the same time, the letter emphasized a hallmark of American higher education: the freedom to express contrarian views. “Academic freedom is among our fundamental principles,” it said, “essential to the self-correcting nature of scientific inquiry, and a privilege that we safeguard.”

McHugh, many people assumed, was the unnamed impetus for both declarations.

Hopkins’s shift not only reflects the public’s far broader discussion about transgender rights and protections, but also the controversies that the discussion engenders.

In February, the Trump administration revoked federal guidelines put in place under President Barack Obama that had directed public schools to allow transgender students to use restrooms matching their gender identity.

And North Carolina passed its own restrictive “bathroom bill” for public spaces — legislation that drew such condemnation, especially from outside of the state, that lawmakers last week voted to repeal the law.

“Obviously there’s a lot of apprehension and anxiety in the transgender community, because we don’t know how health care is going to be impacted [by Trump’s agenda], especially for transgender youth,” said Paula Neira, clinical director of the new Hopkins program. “I think it shows that what we’re doing is timely.”

But as the plans for the transgender health service were coming together last fall, a 143-page report, titled “Sexuality and Gender,” appeared in the New Atlantis, a science and technology magazine published by the Ethics and Public Policy Center, a conservative Christian think tank. It was authored by McHugh and Lawrence S. Mayer, a professor of statistics and biostatistics at Arizona State University and, at the time of the publication, a scholar in residence at Hopkins.

The pair contended that neither sexual orientation nor gender identity is biologically determined. Although the New Atlantis is a small publication, the report dismayed many in the Hopkins medical community and beyond.

Those included Dean Hamer, a scientist at the National Institutes of Health for several decades and one of the first researchers to identify a genetic link to homosexuality.

Hamer termed some of the authors’ statements “pure balderdash.”

The paper gained traction with conservative media, however.

“People began citing the New Atlantis article as a reason to support legislation against transgender people,” said Tonia Poteat, a Hopkins epidemiologist who is an expert on transgender issues.

The result: In October, Poteat and a half-dozen colleagues at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health denounced the report, writing that it “mischaracterizes the current state of the science on sexuality and gender.” More than 600 students, faculty members, interns, alumni and others at the medical school also signed a petition calling on the university and hospital to disavow the paper.

“These are dated, now-discredited theories,” said Chris Beyrer, a professor at the public health school and part of the faculty group that denounced McHugh’s stance.

In an interview from his home in Baltimore, where he still sees patients, McHugh explained that the “duty of all doctors who propose a treatment is to know the nature of the problem they propose to treat. The issue of transgender [people] is, the vast majority coming for surgery now don’t have a biological reason but a psychosocial reason.”

While McHugh successfully lobbied for more than 30 years to keep gender-reassignment surgery from becoming a Medicare benefit, he supports the operation for those born with an intersex condition, which means having a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t fall into the typical definition of male or female.

Most recently his name was prominent on an amicus brief in opposition to the case of Virginia transgender student Gavin Grimm. The teen sued his school district to be allowed to use the bathroom of his gender identity — an issue that until last month was headed to the Supreme Court.

“People with abnormalities of development should be helped to find their place as they see it best,” McHugh said. “But they are a tiny number of the transgender population seeking and being given treatment.”

Those involved in Hopkins’s transgender health services disagree with his positions. But the 85-year-old doctor, who still teaches an occasional course, says he bears no animus toward them.

In fact, he appreciated a visit made last fall by W.P. Andrew Lee, the head of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Hopkins.

Lee wanted to tell the former psychiatry chief that the hospital would be resuming gender-affirmation surgeries, as they are called these days.

The visit was “a professional courtesy,” Lee said in an email to The Washington Post. He declined an interview request.

McHugh elaborated a bit on their conversation and how the two had disagreed: “When I said [surgery] reduced options, he said he was thinking about the people who were pleased about the treatment.”

Their stalemate, the psychiatrist knew, wasn’t going to affect the hospital’s decision.

So far, the new transgender health service involves 25 to 30 professionals across a number of departments, including plastic surgery, urology, endocrinology, nursing and social work. The surgeries will take place at Hopkins Hospital and possibly at some of the system’s satellite centers.

Despite important gender research the university maintained over the years, it has ground to recover. The long break in its surgical program, coupled with McHugh’s vocal positions on gay and transgender issues, caused Hopkins to lose standing within the LGBT community.

“It took an exceptionally long time,” Beyrer said. “Too long.”

“,”author”:”Amy Ellis Nutt”,”date_published”:”2017-04-05T11:24:00.000Z”,”lead_image_url”:”https://www.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_1484w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2017/04/06/Health-Environment-Science/Images/BALTIMORE13091475173031.jpg?t=20170517″,”dek”:null,”next_page_url”:null,”url”:”https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/long-shadow-cast-by-psychiatrist-on-transgender-issues-finally-recedes-at-johns-hopkins/2017/04/05/e851e56e-0d85-11e7-ab07-07d9f521f6b5_story.html”,”domain”:”www.washingtonpost.com”,”excerpt”:”The institution will come full circle on transgender medicine as it resumes surgeries this summer.”,”word_count”:1299,”direction”:”ltr”,”total_pages”:1,”rendered_pages”:1}

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/long-shadow-cast-by-psychiatrist-on-transgender-issues-finally-recedes-at-johns-hopkins/2017/04/05/e851e56e-0d85-11e7-ab07-07d9f521f6b5_story.html

Behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues – Pediatrician in Lynchburg, VA

School-Aged Child Nutrition | Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Parents: Information for Children and Parents

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Millions of children have one or more gay and/or lesbian parents. For some children, having a gay or lesbian parent is not a big deal. Others may find it hard to have a family that is different from most families. Being different in any way can be confusing, frustrating, and even scary. But what really

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  • Help Stop Teenage Suicide

    Category:safety_and_prevention

  • Helping Your Child Cope With Death

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    By school age, children understand that death is an irreversible event. Yet even though youngsters recognize that death is something more than going to sleep for a long time, they still may have many unanswered questions that they may not verbalize: Where did grandmother go when she died? What is she

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  • Helping Your Child Cope With Life

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Every parent's dream is to raise perfect children who have no worries and lead charmed, happy lives free of pain and hurt. We dream that we can keep our children safe from loss, heartache, and danger. But even if we could, would it really help them?

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  • Inhalants: What You Need to Know

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Young people today can face strong peer pressure to try drugs, including a group of substances called inhalants. Inhalant abuse is particularly a problem with younger teens, but even children as young as 5 or 6 years may try inhalants.

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  • Know the Facts About HIV and AIDS

    Category:common_illnesses_and_conditions

    HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). While there is no cure for HIV, early diagnosis and treatment are very effective at keeping people healthy. In addition, there are things you can do to prevent getting HIV. Read on to learn more

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  • Learning Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know

    Category:school-aged_children

    Your child will learn many things in life—how to listen, speak, read, write, and do math. Some skills may be harder to learn than others. If your child is trying his best to learn certain skills but is not able to keep up with his peers, it’s important to find out why. Your child may have a learning

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  • Making Healthy Decisions About Sex: Important Information For Teens

    Category:safety_and_prevention

    Before you decide to have sex or if you are already having sex, you need to know how to stay healthy. Even if you think you know everything you need to know about sex, take a few minutes and read on. Your doctor wants to make sure you know the facts.

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  • Marijuana: What You Need to Know

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    As a parent, you are your child’s first and best protection against drug use. The following is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about marijuana and how to help your child say “No” to drug use. (Child refers to child or teen in this publication.)

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  • Media History

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Please check one answer for each question. If the question does not apply to your family (ie, you do not own a computer or mobile device), leave that section blank.

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  • Medicine and the Media: How to Make Sense of the Messages

    Category:newborns_infants_and_toddlers

    Your child is sick or hurt and the first thought on your mind is, “How can I make my child better?” That's natural. No parent wants his or her child to suffer. So how do you decide what medicines to give or treatments to try?

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  • Ratings: Making Healthy Media Choices

    Category:newborns_infants_and_toddlers

    Research has shown that children are influenced by what they see and hear, especially at very young ages. To help parents make informed choices about what their children see and hear, many entertainment companies use ratings systems. Ratings give parents more information about the content of television

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  • Responding to Children's Emotional Needs During Times of Crisis:Information for Parents

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Pediatricians are often the firstresponders for children and families suffering emotional and psychologicalreactions to terrorism and other disasters. As such, pediatricians have a uniqueopportunity to help parents and other caregivers communicate

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  • Sibling Relationships

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Almost 80% of children grow up with at least one brother or sister. Brothers and sisters teach each other how to get along with others. Even if they do not always get along with each other, siblings play very positive roles in each other's lives.

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  • Single Parenting

    Category:behavioral_and_psychosocial_issues

    Single-parent families are more and more common in today's society. While raising children alone isn't easy, children in single-parent homes can grow up just as happy as children in 2-parent homes. Read on to find out how single parents can better cope with the special challenges of raising children

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  • Sleep Problems in Children

    Category:newborns_infants_and_toddlers

    Sleep problems are very common during the first few years of life. Problems may include waking up during the night, not wanting to go to sleep, nightmares, sleepwalking, and bedwetting. If frantic upset persists with no apparent cause, call your child's doctor.

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Source: https://www.hopkinspediatrics.com/articles/officite_aap/category/49916/2