Seasoned Salmon for One

Thousands of fishery workers, many from outside Alaska, are headed to Bristol Bay. One tiny hospital says its coronavirus plan can’t handle them

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine

This article was produced in partnership with ProPublica.

Later this spring, Alaska’s Bristol Bay will blossom into one of the largest annual salmon fisheries in the world.

The regional population of about 6,700 will triple with the arrival of fishermen, crews and seasonal workers on jets but also private planes and small boats, many traveling from state.

And yet the heart of the health care system in southwestern Alaska, where the Spanish flu once decimated entire communities, is a 16-bed hospital in Dillingham operated by the Bristol Bay Area Health Corp.

Only four beds are currently equipped for coronavirus patients. There are no intensive-care unit rooms. As of Wednesday the hospital had a few dozen coronavirus tests for the entire Florida-sized region.

Chief nursing officer Lee Yale said in an email that the Kanakanak Hospital has four negative pressure rooms to treat COVID-19 patients without infecting others and two ventilators.

“We have staffing but if they get ill we will be in a tight spot,” she wrote in an email. “(The) fishing industry will devastate our surge plan and we can not support and cover our villages if this season opens.”

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The state of Alaska has declared the fishing industry to be a critical workforce, meaning employees can report for work but should make every effort to observe travel quarantine mandates.

If the newly arrived fishermen, crews, cannery workers and others need to quarantine for two weeks, it’s unclear where everyone will hunker down.

Local store shelves are already bare of Clorox, Lysol and rubber gloves, residents said.

Dillingham, the largest community in the Bristol Bay region with a population of 2,300, is 320 miles from Anchorage by air. Compounding matters, the hospital executive who ran daily operations for the health care system is a job after downplaying the coronavirus threat to colleagues.

“We’re scared. … People come from all over the world for Bristol Bay fishing,” said Gayla Hoseth, second chief for the Dillingham-based Curyung Tribal Council. “There’s 7,000 of us who live here, and this hospital cannot handle the 7,000 of us if we get sick. Imagine (when) our population triples and quadruples in the summertime.”

Bristol Bay is a magnet for people in the summer, with a seasonal migration of about 13,000 workers for the lucrative fishing season. The commercial salmon fishery here is the largest in the state, but as of 2010, about 60% of earnings went to out-of-state permit holders.

Almost all the major Bristol Bay seafood processing companies are based in Seattle, an early hot spot for coronavirus, and two-thirds of Bristol Bay processing workers live in West Coast states at other times of the year, according to the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

“When it comes to wild salmon, we are over half the world’s sockeye and over half of the Alaska salmon value,” said Andy Wink, executive director for the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association.

The nonprofit industry group on Thursday issued an advisory urging the fleet to delay travel to Bristol Bay until May 1.

“Keep in mind, it is possible to carry this virus without symptoms and unknowingly infect others leading to overtaxed medical capacity and/or death(s),” the advisory said. “You do NOT want to be the outsider photographed or seen around town in public spaces if this situation turns for the worst,” the group warned its fishermen.

Wink said his nonprofit is working with local governments on a plan to avoid overcrowding Bristol Bay Area Health Corp. clinics and the Dillingham hospital with sick fishermen, processors and support workers.

“We are taking the stance that we don’t want to rely on the local clinics or if we do, they need to be bolstered substantially,” Wink said.

As the health care provider for the region, Bristol Bay Area Health Corp. operates the only regional hospital and the clinics in 21 surrounding villages. Clark, the health corporation chief executive, said the Dillingham hospital is seeking more equipment to meet the potential for coronavirus patients among the local and visiting fishing industry patients.

Chief nursing officer Yale said the hospital had 37 tests on hand as of Wednesday, and that all tests performed had returned negative.

Meantime, for many in Bristol Bay, the looming COVID-19 threat recalls family histories of death and loss in the face of past epidemics.

“The fact that all of our contemporary families are descendants of those children and few adults that survived 1919 is one of (the) major reasons why we are so passionate about protecting ourselves from this pandemic,” said Courtenay Carty, tribal administrator of the Dillingham based Curyung Tribal Council, which has declared a state of emergency and sought to restrict travel to the city.

Carty’s great-grandmother was orphaned in Dillingham by the 1919 flu and raised by family members, and her grandfather was orphaned by tuberculosis in the 1940s.

“What is history to others is our tribal and familial identities,” she said.

Update on today’s story: local Bristol Bay orgs are calling for strict requirements on any fishery worker heading to the region.

Among them: Workers would need to be tested and found negative for COVID-19. Then quarantined in Bristol Bay, then tested AGAIN. … pic..com/0djzo9t4mB

— Hunker Down Hopkins (@kylehopkinsAK) April 3, 2020

Note: This story was updated to more accurately describe who raised tribal administrator Courtenay Carty’s great-grandmother.

Source: https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/rural-alaska/2020/04/03/thousands-of-fishery-workers-many-from-outside-alaska-are-headed-to-bristol-bay-one-tiny-hospital-says-it-cant-handle-them-all/

Saucy Salmon with Chef Tell it it Is

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine
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While many Jews believe that the 11th commandment is “Thou shalt not cook on Sunday,” my 11th commandment is eight minutes per inch. Whether frying, sauteeing, baking, steaming, or poaching, the thickness of the fish determines the time. One inch thick cooks for eight minutes, tops; i.e., two minutes in t

he pan, then six in the oven.
The salmon should be cooked just barely through. It will finish cooking in its own heat and will then be moist and flavorful. Please do not dry it out.

This salmon can be prepared without salt if using balsamic vinegar instead of soy sauce. No added fat is necessary for either preparation. Each method produces a glazed salmon. One is very Asian in flavor: sweet, salty, and soy. The other has no salt, or less salt, and a sweet balsamic vinegar glaze.

Ingredients
Salmon, (size of your choosing)
Fillet – fresh, never frozen, all skin removed
Kosher salt
Ground black pepper
Sugar
Reduced sodium, or low sodium soy sauce, or a high quality balsamic vinegar

Soy Sauce Glaze:

Off we go. Rinse and pat dry the salmon fillet. Heat a thick-bottomed, heavy skillet or cast-iron pan. Coat salmon with sugar and place into hot pan. Sear for a minute or so. Sprinkle top with black pepper. Pour a couple of ounces of soy sauce into the pan — the amount depends upon the size of the fish.

Lower the heat. The soy sauce should create a sweet and salty glaze on the salmon. Slide the salmon onto a parchment paper lined baking dish or foil pan and place into oven.

Bake at 325 F for approximately five minutes, depending upon the thickness of the fillet.
If you , you can flip the salmon fillet in the pan, cover the pan, and turn off the heat. Another variation is to remove the pan from the stove, shut off the burner, cover the pan, and let sit until properly done.

Balsamic glaze:

Rinse and pat salmon dry. Coat with sugar and place into a hot, thick-bottomed pan on medium-high heat. Sprinkle with black pepper and salt if you . The salt can be omitted for those on restricted diets.

After a minute or two, slide the salmon onto a parchment-lined, oven-safe dish, Pyrex, or foil pan, and place into a 325 F oven for the proper time for the thickness.

For example, for a one inch thick salmon, cook six minutes (eight minutes minus two in the pan) maximum.

The perfect side dish is crisp-thin fries. Add broccoli or spinach sauteed in garlic and olive oil.

Slice a few garlic cloves and blanch the broccoli. Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a pan on medium heat, add garlic, lower the flame, sweat the garlic (sweat instructions to follow). Place broccoli into pan, raise heat to medium/high. Toss in garlic infused oil until tender. Again, be careful not to burn it.

The spinach can be cooked at the same as the broccoli.

Each fish preparation might yield some sauce to spoon over the salmon. If not, I recommend no added sauce. The fish should be moist if properly cooked.

Blanching: Place spinach or any vegetable in boiling water for one minute. Remove, shock in ice or ice water to halt cooking, then drain.

Sweating: Garlic and onions should be placed into warm oil and then sauteed, tossed or stirred until golden, translucent and soft (not browned).

Salmon is high in Omega-3 fatty oil, and linked to positive cardiovascular health. Salmon should be steamed, baked, smoked or sauteed. Olive oil is best for cooking salmon, if necessary, because the other unsaturated, heart healthy oils are loaded with Omega-6.

By Gary Schuman

Columnist Gary Schuman is a former New York City restaurateur, New York Times restaurant reviewer and State of Florida-certified cooking instructor.

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Source: https://jewishtimes.com/100315/salmon-recipe/food-feature/

Virus spikes could emerge weeks after US economic reopenings

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine

U.S. states are beginning to restart their economies after months of paralyzing coronavirus lockdowns, but it could take weeks until it becomes clear whether those reopenings will cause a spike in COVID-19 cases, experts said Wednesday.

The outbreak’s trajectory varies wildly across the country, with steep increases in cases in some places, decreases in others and infection rates that can shift dramatically from neighborhood to neighborhood.

“Part of the challenge is although we are focused on the top-line national numbers in terms of our attention, what we are seeing is 50 different curves and 50 different stories playing out,” said Thomas Tsai, assistant professor at the Harvard Global Health Institute. “And what we have seen about COVID-19 is that the story and the effect is often very local.”

A handful of states started easing their lockdowns about two weeks ago, allowing reopenings by establishments ranging from shopping malls in Texas to beach hotels in South Carolina to gyms in Wyoming.

Sparsely populated Wyoming, which has some of the lowest infection numbers in the United States, plans to reopen bars and restaurants Friday.

Georgia was one of the first states where some businesses were allowed to open their doors again, starting April 24 with barber shops, hair salons, gyms, bowling alleys and tattoo parlors.

But it may be five to six weeks from then before the effects are known, said Crystal Watson of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.

“As we saw early in the year, epidemics of COVID-19 start slow and take some time to build and become evident,” Watson said in an email.

The outbreak’s trajectory can vary greatly around the country, according to an Associated Press analysis of confirmed cases. For instance, steep increases in daily new cases are occurring in Hennepin County in Minnesota and Fairfax County in Virginia, while in others, such as Bergen County, New Jersey, and Wayne County, Michigan, there's been a steady decline.

The AP analyzed case counts compiled by Johns Hopkins University, using a rolling seven-day average to account for day-to-day variability in test reporting.

In Geneva, meanwhile, a top World Health Organization official warned that it’s possible the new coronavirus may be here to stay.

“This virus may never go away,” Dr. Michael Ryan said at a press briefing. Without a vaccine, he said, it could take years for the global population to build up sufficient levels of immunity.

“I think it’s important to put this on the table,” he said. “This virus may become just another endemic virus in our communities” other previously novel diseases, such as HIV, which have never disappeared, but for which effective treatments have been developed.

It can take three to five days for someone newly infected with the coronavirus to feel sick, and some infected people won’t even have symptoms. Since testing is mostly reserved in the U.S. for those with symptoms, it can take two weeks or so — the time for one group of people to spread the virus to another — to have enough testing data to reflect a surge in cases.

“If you are doing adequate testing, it will take two to three weeks” to spot an increase, Dr. Ashish Jha, director of Harvard’s Global Health Institute, said Wednesday as he prepared to speak to a congressional subcommittee on the crisis.

He urged a dramatic increase in testing.

“It was the failure of testing that caused our country to shut down,” Jha said. “We need federal leadership on the level of testing, guidance on whom to test and federal help on the sheer capacity, the number of tests that can be done. We still do not have the testing capacity we need to open up safely.”

New coronavirus clusters have surfaced around the world as nations struggle to balance restarting their economies and preventing a second wave of infections.

Authorities in the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the pandemic first began late last year, reportedly are pressing ahead to test all 11 million residents for the virus within 10 days after a handful of new infections were found.

South Korea confirmed 29 more coronavirus cases over the past 24 hours as it battles a spike in infections linked to nightlife spots in Seoul, threatening the country's hard-won progress in the fight against pandemic.

And Lebanese authorities reinstated a nationwide lockdown for four days beginning Wednesday night after a spike in reported infections and complaints that social distancing rules were being ignored.

In the U.S., as in many countries, the lockdowns have resulted in catastrophic levels of job losses. The U.S. unemployment rate soared to 14.7% in April, the highest rate since the Great Depression. There are roughly 30 million Americans work.

In Washington, U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell warned Wednesday that a prolonged recession could cause extensive damage to the economy and urged Congress and the White House to act further to prevent long-lasting harm.

The Fed and Congress have already taken immense steps, but Powell warned that numerous bankruptcies among small businesses and extended unemployment for many people remain a serious risk.

While costly, more assistance in government spending or tax policies would be “worth it if it helps avoid long-term economic damage and leaves us with a stronger recovery,” he said.

Powell spoke a day after Democratic leaders proposed a $3 trillion aid package that would direct money to state and local governments, households, and health-care workers. That would come on top of roughly $3 trillion in earlier financial assistance. The Fed, for its part, has cut interest rates to near zero and created numerous emergency lending programs.

But Trump administration officials have said they want to first see how previous aid packages affect the economy, and were skeptical about allowing more spending right now.

The tension in balancing people’s safety against severe economic fallout is playing out across the world. Italy partially lifted lockdown restrictions last week only to see a big jump in confirmed coronavirus cases in its hardest-hit region. Pakistan reported 2,000 new infections in a single day after crowds of people crammed into markets as restrictions were eased.

The U.S. has the largest coronavirus outbreak in the world by far: 1.39 million infections and over 84,000 deaths, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. Worldwide, the virus has infected more than 4.3 million people and killed some 297,000, according to the Johns Hopkins tally. Experts say the actual numbers are ly far higher.

———

Johnson reported from Washington state; Smith reported from Providence, Rhode Island, and Sullivan reported from Minneapolis. AP data journalist Nicky Forster in Berkley, Massachusetts, and Associated Press journalists around the world contributed to this report.

———

Follow AP pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Source: https://www.wdrb.com/news/national/wuhan-to-test-all-residents-after-handful-of-new-infections/article_07c01d48-dfd7-5f43-b287-25c08a522906.html

In This Remote Town, Spring Means Salmon — and Thousands of Fishermen From Coronavirus Hot Spots

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine

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Later this spring, Alaska’s Bristol Bay will blossom into one of the largest annual salmon fisheries in the world.

The regional population of about 6,600 will triple in size with the arrival of fishermen, crews and seasonal workers on jets but also private planes and small boats, many traveling from state.

And yet the heart of the health care system in southwestern Alaska, in a corner of the state where the Spanish flu once orphaned a generation, is a 16-bed hospital in Dillingham operated by the Bristol Bay Area Health Corp. Only four beds are currently equipped for coronavirus patients. As of Wednesday, the hospital had a few dozen coronavirus tests for the entire Florida-sized region, tribal leaders said.

If those newly arrived workers need to quarantine for two weeks, as mandated by the state, residents said it’s unclear where everyone will hunker down. Local store shelves are already bare of Clorox, Lysol and rubber gloves.

Dillingham, the largest community in the Bristol Bay region with a population of 2,300, is 320 miles from Anchorage by air.

“We’re scared. … People come from all over the world for Bristol Bay fishing,” said Gayla Hoseth, second chief for the Dillingham-based Curyung Tribal Council. “There’s 7,000 of us who live here, and this hospital cannot handle the 7,000 of us if we get sick. Imagine (when) our population triples and quadruples in the summertime.”

Dillingham, Alaska. (Bill Roth/Anchorage Daily News)

Compounding matters, the hospital executive who ran daily operations for the health care system is a job after downplaying the coronavirus threat to colleagues.

A March 16 email from the executive — which repeated a conspiratorial meme suggesting the coronavirus is somehow a politically motivated phenomenon — set flame to a deep anxiety among some tribal leaders over the vulnerability of Alaska villages in a pandemic.

“Just a reminder that FLU kills many every year!” wrote Lecia Scotford, who was the chief operating officer. (The coronavirus is not the flu. It appears to be more contagious and more lethal.)

The message soon began to circulate in the Bristol Bay region, drawing a blistering response from some tribal and local leaders.

Robert Clark, president and chief executive of Bristol Bay Area Health Corp., said Scotford’s last day was Monday. He would not say if she was fired, citing “personnel stuff,” but said “she was separated.”

Scotford did not respond to emails, phone calls and messages requesting comment. Her email to lists of “division managers” and “department managers” within the regional health organization also emphasized the need for calm, common sense and good hygiene, and for the hospital to be prepared to serve the public.

“That (email) was very concerning to me because that kind of lets people’s guard down,” Norman Van Vactor, president of the Bristol Bay Economic Development Corp., said in a phone interview.

Bristol Bay is a magnet for people in the summer, with a seasonal migration of about 13,000 workers for the lucrative fishing season. The commercial salmon fishery here is the largest in the state, but as of 2010, about 60% of earnings went to out-of-state permit holders.

Almost all the major Bristol Bay seafood processing companies are based in Seattle, an early hot spot for coronavirus, and two thirds of Bristol Bay processing workers live in West Coast states at other times of the year, according to the Institute of Social and Economic Research at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game forecasts some 34.6 million sockeye salmon will be harvested there this year.

“When it comes to wild salmon, we are over half the world’s sockeye and over half of the Alaska salmon value,” said Andy Wink, executive director for the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association.

The nonprofit industry group on Thursday issued an advisory urging the fleet to delay travel to Bristol Bay until May 1.

“Keep in mind, it is possible to carry this virus without symptoms and unknowingly infect others leading to overtaxed medical capacity and/or death(s),” the advisory said. “You do NOT want to be the outsider photographed or seen around town in public spaces if this situation turns for the worst,” the group warned its fishermen.

Wink said his nonprofit is working with local governments on a plan to avoid overcrowding Bristol Bay Area Health Corp. clinics and the Dillingham hospital with sick fishermen, processors and support workers.

“We are taking the stance that we don’t want to rely on the local clinics or if we do, the need to be bolstered substantially,” Wink said.

As the health care provider for the region, Bristol Bay Area Health Corp. operates the only regional hospital and the clinics in 21 surrounding villages. It employed 470 people and reported revenue of $76.7 million in 2017, according to a tax form that Scotford submitted to the IRS.

Clark, the health corporation chief executive, said the Dillingham hospital is seeking more equipment to meet the potential for coronavirus patients among the local and visiting fishing industry patients.

Chief nursing officer Lee Yale said the hospital had 37 tests on hand as of Wednesday, and that all tests performed had returned negative. The Dillingham facility has no ICU beds, four negative pressure rooms to treat COVID patients without infecting others, plus two ventilators for the region.

“We have staffing but if they get ill we will be in a tight spot,” she wrote in an email. “(The) fishing industry will devastate our surge plan and we can not support and cover our villages if this season opens.”

Meantime, for many in Bristol Bay, the looming COVID-19 threat recalls family histories of death and loss in the face of past epidemics.

The Spanish flu wracked the U.S. in 1918 and 1919, including this Kansas hospital, above. Residents of Bristol Bay are descendants of Spanish flu survivors. (Wikimedia Commons)

“We are the survivors of the survivors of the orphans of the Spanish flu,” said Hoseth, the Dillingham tribe second chief.

Another member of the tribe, tribal administrator Courtenay Carty, said her great-grandmother was orphaned in Dillingham by the 1919 flu and raised by family members, and her grandfather was orphaned by tuberculosis in the 1940s.

“The fact that all of our contemporary families are descendants of those children and few adults that survived 1919 is one of (the) major reasons why we are so passionate about protecting ourselves from this pandemic,” she said. “What is history to others is our tribal and familial identities.”

Her tribe declared a state of emergency because of the coronavirus on March 24, calling for a stop to all but essential travel to the city.

Clarification, April 3, 2020: This story was updated to more accurately describe who raised tribal administrator Courtenay Carty’s great-grandmother.

Source: https://www.propublica.org/article/in-this-remote-town-spring-means-salmon-and-thousands-of-fisherman-from-coronavirus-hot-spots

Seasonal worker has COVID-19 in Dillingham; 5th Homer resident tests positive

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The community of Dillingham, which has pushed back against the prospect of having a commercial salmon fishing season this year during the coronavirus pandemic, had its first seasonal worker test positive for COVID-19 on Friday.

Also, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services reported Saturday that a fifth Homer resident has tested positive for the disease, but it is not clear whether the person was tested locally at South Peninsula Hospital.

Hospital Public Information Officer Derotha Ferraro said on Saturday that the state has not notified SPH of any additional positive tests from the local hospital.

At press time DHSS had not responded to an email seeking more information on the Homer case.

This brings the number of Homer residents who have tested positive for the disease to five. Three of those people were tested locally in Homer.

The state’s Unified Command Joint Information Center reported Saturday that an out-of-state worker who had recently arrived in Dillingham to work seasonally for Trident Seafoods has tested positive.

“The case was discovered yesterday when several workers quarantining in the same location were tested for COVID-19 at the end of their 14-day quarantine,” the command center press release states. “Before workers can be released from quarantine, they need to meet all requirements outlined in the City of Dillingham ordinance including testing requirements.”

Only one worker that quarantined group in Dillingham tested positive and they were immediately isolated from the others, the state reported. Trident Seafood is arranging transportation, and the worker is leaving Dillingham sometime on Saturday.

“Although the individual is doing well and does not require hospitalization, Trident determined it would be best to transport the individual the community an abundance of caution to help protect Bristol Bay communities,” the release states.

Even though the remaining workers in that group all tested negative, they will observe another 14-day quarantine because they are considered close contacts of the person who tested positive. They will be monitored by public health nurses and will not be allowed to leave quarantine, the press release states.

According to Trident, the remaining workers in that group will have to test negative an additional two times by the end of their quarantine before being allowed to leave.

According to Gina Carpenter, a Public Health nurse in Dillingham, the group of workers arrived together and immediately went to their quarantine location.

“They haven’t exposed the community because they haven’t been out in the community,” Carpenter said in the press release. “This shows the benefit of these rules. These workers did everything right and followed the quarantine and testing requirements laid out in Trident’s industry plan.”

Reopening continues

Addressing myriad topics during a Friday event press conference, Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s administration announced an extension of the mandatory 14-day quarantine for visitors to Alaska, addressed additional fishing season guidelines for setnetters and said the Aug. 18 primary election will proceed with in-person voting.

The health mandate that stipulates a 14-day self quarantine for anyone entering Alaska has been extended to June 2, but Dunleavy said the measure is being reevaluated daily and could be changed again before that date.

“You’re going to see more and more that we aren’t shifting away from the virus, but what we’re doing is shifting to managing the virus,” Dunleavy said.

He said the extension of the mandatory quarantine for visitors is to give the state time to see how its phased plan for reopening the economy and society is going to affect the number of COVID-19 cases.

“If things are looking good … there will be a decision point on the travel coming in from outside of the state,” Dunleavy said.

Shifting gears to the commercial fishing industry, which has already begun its season in Cordova, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services Commissioner Adam Crum announced new measures being taken to screen seafood industry workers coming into the state from Outside.

The state is partnering with a contractor, he said, to test incoming workers on-site in the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport starting on Tuesday.

“This is another option, another layer that we’re putting in to make sure that we catch everybody coming in,” Crum said.

Companies that opt to utilize the testing at Ted Stevens must sign up their employees in advance, Crum said, and the employees must plan to stay in Anchorage for 48 hours to wait for the tests results to come back.

Crum said the plans for screening and testing will vary greatly across the board for seafood industry workers, depending on the sector of commercial fishing they are in, the processor they work for, and more.

Some companies are testing their workers before they leave for Alaska while others are testing them again at their final destination.

Crum said testing at the Anchorage airport is an option for those companies unable to test workers at their final destinations or that are unable to quarantine them.

Additionally, Crum announced that additional guidance specifically for setnetters is being added to the health mandate that guides commercial fishing operations in the state during the coronavirus pandemic.

“This was developed with a lot of input,” Crum said. “We had regional-based groups talking with stakeholders, industry, working with communities about the unique needs. And so this is something we’re very happy to get out there.”

The state also updated the acknowledgement form that vessel captains are required to fill out and post on their boats. Crum said it has been updated to be more specific after requests from those in the commercial fishing industry.

Swinging over to the election process for the upcoming August primary, Lt. Gov. Kevin Meyer said the state will not be using mail-in voting and will be sticking with the status quo.

“We’ve determined the best way to go is to go with our current process, but with some modifications,” he said.

Meyer said those who wish to vote from home and avoid the public lines and polling places will be able to request absentee ballots. He said the state will be pushing absentee and early voting in order to reduce the number of people turning out to vote all at the same time on election day.

The state has 165 locations for voting early, which Meyer said can be done up to 15 days before an election. Social distancing and personal protective equipment will be used both on election day and at the early voting locations.

Asked by a reporter whether canvass boards around the state will be given more time to certify the August election, given the lihood of a greater number of absentee ballots, Meyer said it is more ly the state will look to hire more canvass board workers.

“I think rather than ask for more time, we’re going to ask for more workers to help us do the count,” he said. “So that we can meet that statutory deadline for 10 days.”

Also on Friday, the Alaska Legislature was set to return to Juneau to ratify the revised program legislative requests they used to allocate about $900 million in federal CARES Act dollars.

A Juneau man has filed a lawsuit claiming using the RPL process to allocate the funds was unconstitutional. The Alaska State Legislature website shows both the House and Senate are to reconvene at 2 p.m.

on Monday.

In an email exchange with other legislators on Friday, Rep. Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski, compared proposed safety protocols for legislators re-entering the Capitol to Nazi treatment of Jews in Germany, the Anchorage Daily News and Associated Press reported.

The email was originally reported by Jeff Landfield of the Alaska Landmine blog.

“If my sticker falls off, do I get a new one or do I get a public shaming too?” Carpenter wrote in his emailed response to the protocols. “Are the stickers available as a yellow Star of David?”

The email exchange shows that Rep. Grier Hopkins, D-Fairbanks, replied to Carpenter, saying “This is disgusting. Keep your Holocaust jokes to yourself.”

Rep. Sarah Vance, R-Homer, supported Carpenter.

“This is no joke,” she replied in the email exchange. “We should all be concerned about the implications of being labeled as ‘non compliant’ or wearing a badge of ‘compliance.’”

COVID-19 by the numbers: DHSS reported four new COVID-19 cases on Saturday. This reflects the cases that were reported to the state on Friday.

On Friday, the state had announced one new case of an Alaska resident as well as one positive case of a non-resident. The non-resident is a seafood industry worker whose case was identified in the Municipality of Anchorage, and their case is not being included in Alaska’s official count.

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation also reported a new positive case on Friday, which was included in the state’s case count on Saturday. The person traveled from Anchorage, to Bethel, to a village in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

“The person was identified through COVID-19 screening and testing of passengers traveling through the Bethel Airport,” a DHSS press release said.

On Saturday, the state’s updated numbers showed a total of 392 positive COVID-19 cases. Of those, 344 people have recovered from COVID-19 so far.

The addition of the Trident worker in Dillingham makes nine total cases of non-Alaska residents.

Locally, South Peninsula Hospital had sent 640 samples off for testing as of Friday, according to the hospital’s website. Of those, four total tests have come back positive, 626 have come back negative and 10 tests are still pending.

Reach Megan Pacer at mpacer@homernews.com.

Source: https://www.peninsulaclarion.com/news/seasonal-worker-has-covid-19-in-dillingham-5th-homer-resident-tests-positive/

Miso Salmon with Lime-Ginger Glaze and Jicama Salad – Vital Choice Wild Seafood & Organics

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine
We met chef and cookbook author Rebecca Katz at the recent Food as Medicine conference—which she serves as Executive Chef—and found her to be delightful company and extremely savvy about the connection between health and food.

Rebecca has consulted, lectured, and done culinary demonstrations for leading health care institutions including Manhattan's Cornell Medical Center, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) Medical School, and Johns Hopkins Medicine.

She is also the Senior Chef at the internationally acclaimed Commonweal Cancer Help Program in Bolinas, California, and founder of the Inner Cook, a culinary business focused on teaching individuals and communities how to make healthy connections with food.

Amazon.

com carries her wonderful book, One Bite at a Time: Nourishing Recipes for Cancer Survivors and Their Friends.

This week's delicious recipes come from her Health Cook column in Guideposts magazine. Here's how Rebecca describes them:

“In putting together my book, One Bite at a Time, the miso Salmon with lime-ginger glaze and the jicama (pronounced HEE-ka-mah) salad were two of my favorite recipes. They go so great together!”

“The flavors in the Salmon dish compliment one another: the touch of sesame oil provides fat (unsaturated, the good kind), the lime contributes the acid that unlocks the Salmon's flavor, the miso gives a hint of salt and the mirin (a Japanese sweet rice wine) adds a gentle flavor.”

Note: Miso is fermented soy bean paste, and is available at natural food markets and Asian groceries. It is usually used to make a broth, but serves as a seasoning in this recipe. Be sure you get mild “white” miso… darker varieties will be too strong.

Miso Salmon with Lime-Ginger Glaze

This recipe comes to our readers thanks to Rebecca Katz
Rebecca's Tips: “You can grill this dish too, but use caution: The marinade can burn easily if the grill is too hot.Before grilling, wipe the marinade off of the Salmon, rub the Salmon with a teaspoon of sesame oil and wipe the grill with sesame oil. Grill Salmon over slow heat for about 4 minutes each side.”Serve with Jicama and Red Cabbage Salad.Serves 43 tablespoons white miso3 tablespoons fresh lime juice1/4 cup mirin (sweet Japanese cooking wine)1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

4 (4

‒6 oz) wild Salmon fillets

  • Preheat oven to 400 F. Whisk together miso, lime juice, mirin, ginger, and sesame oil in a bowl.
  • Put Salmon in a baking dish, pour half the marinade over salmon and turn to coat well. Reserve remaining marinade.
  • Marinate Salmon in fridge for at least 1 hour.
  • Place Salmon in a baking dish with its marinade and 1/4 cup of water. Bake 8‒10 minutes, or a few minutes longer if fillets are thick.
  • In a saucepan, heat reserved marinade over medium heat until it starts bubbling.
  • When Salmon is cooked, pour marinade over fillets and serve immediately.

Per Serving: 256 Calories, 9 grams Total Fat (1 G SAT, 3 G MONO), 10 grams Carbohydrates, 27 grams Protein, 0 grams Fiber, 409 mg Sodium

Jicama Salad

This recipe comes to our readers thanks to Rebecca Katz
Rebecca's Tips: “Nuts store well in freezer, so make extra. Jicama can be stored in refrigerator for several days. Cover with cold water mixed with lime or lemon juice. If you love a crunchy salad, this recipe is for you. Red cabbage is a nutrient-rich vegetable. Jicama is loaded with nutrients, including iron.”

Serves 6

‒8

Nuts

1/2 cup sliced almonds

1 tablespoon maple syrup

Pinch of cayenne pepper

Dressing

1/2 teaspoon jalapeños, seeded and diced3 tablespoons rice vinegar1 tablespoon fresh lime juice1/4 cup tamari (aged soy sauce)3 tablespoons maple syrup1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced

Pinch of sea salt

Salad

1 pound red cabbage (about 6 cups chopped)1/2 pound jicama, peeled, small julienned (about 4 cups)2 tablespoons fresh mint, finely chopped

1/4 cup fresh cilantro or fresh basil, finely chopped

  • Toss almonds in bowl with maple syrup and cayenne. Spread on pan and bake 10‒12 minutes, until golden and fragrant. Remove from oven and cool to room temperature.
  • Dressing: whisk together all ingredients. Set aside.
  • Salad: cut cabbage in half, remove core and shred with sharp knife.
  • In a bowl, combine cabbage, jicama, mint and cilantro.
  • Toss with dressing. Sprinkle nuts on top and serve.

Per Serving: 131 Calories, 5 grams Total Fat (0 G SAT, 3 G MONO), 19 grams Carbohydrates, 5 grams Protein, 5 grams Fiber, 336 mg Sodium

Source: https://www.vitalchoice.com/recipe/miso-salmon-with-lime-ginger-glaze-and-jicama-salad

Daniel Salmon – Faculty Directory – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Seasoned Salmon for One | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Home > Faculty > Daniel Salmon – Faculty Directory – Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

  • Institute for Vaccine Safety

615 N. Wolfe Street Room W5035 Baltimore, Maryland 21205

443-803-7754

dsalmon1@jhu.edu

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PhD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2003 MPH, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, 1996 BA, Rutgers University, 1991

Dr. Salmon’s primary research and practice interest is optimizing the prevention of childhood infectious diseases through the use of vaccines. He is broadly trained in vaccinology, with an emphasis in epidemiology, behavioral epidemiology, and health policy. Dr.

Salmon’s focus has been on determining the individual and community risks of vaccine refusal, understanding factors that impact vaccine acceptance, evaluating and improving state laws providing exemptions to school immunization requirements, developing systems and science in vaccine safety, and effective vaccine risk communication. Dr. Salmon has considerable experience developing surveillance systems, using surveillance data for epidemiological studies, and measuring immunization coverage through a variety of approaches. Dr. Salmon has worked with state and federal public health agencies to strengthen immunization programs and pandemic planning.

Haddon Fellow, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (1999-2001)

Achievement Award – Dedication to Students, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (2005)

Development of the Federal Immunization Safety Task Force, Assistant Secretary for Health (2008)

Federal Monitoring of H1N1 Vaccine Safety, Assistant Secretary for Health (2010)

Patient Education Working Group Co-Chair, Assistant Secretary for Health (2012)

Outstanding recent graduate (within past 10 years), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (2013)

Delta Omega Society (2014)

  • International Health, vaccine
  • immunization
  • vaccine safety
  • mandatory immunization

Dr. Salmon’s primary research and practice interest is optimizing the prevention of childhood infectious diseases through the use of vaccines. He is broadly trained in vaccinology, with an emphasis in epidemiology, behavioral epidemiology, and health policy. Dr.

Salmon’s focus has been on determining the individual and community risks of vaccine refusal, understanding factors that impact vaccine acceptance, evaluating and improving state laws providing exemptions to school immunization requirements, developing systems and science in vaccine safety, and effective vaccine risk communication. Dr. Salmon has considerable experience developing surveillance systems, using surveillance data for epidemiological studies, and measuring immunization coverage through a variety of approaches. Dr. Salmon has worked with state and federal public health agencies to strengthen immunization programs and pandemic planning.

  • Salmon DA, Dudley MZ*, Glanz JM, Omer SB. Vaccine hesitancy: Causes, consequences, and a call to action. Co-Published. Vaccine & Am J Prev Med. 2015 Nov 23; Suppl 4:D66-71.
  • Salmon DA, Proschan M, Forshee R, Gargiullo P, Bleser W*, Burwen DR, Cunningham F, Garman P, Greene SK, Lee GM, Vellozzi C, Yih WK, Gellin B, Lurie N, and the H1N1 GBS Meta-Analysis Working Group. A Meta-Analysis of the Association between Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Inactivated Vaccines in the United States. The Lancet. 2013 Apr 27; 2819876): 1461-8.
  • Salmon DA, Yih WK, Lee GM, Rosofsky R, Brown J, Vannice K*, Tokars J, Roddy J, Brand W, Ball R, Gellin B, Lurie N, Platt R, Lieu TA, and the PRISM Program H1N1 Project Collaborators. Success of program linking data sources to monitor H1N1 vaccine safety points to potential for even broader safety surveillance. Health Aff (Millwood). 2012 Nov; 31(11):2518-27.
  • Salmon DA, Teret SP, MacIntyre CR, Salisbury D, Halsey NA. Compulsory Vaccination and Conscientious or Philosophical Exemptions: Past, Present and Future. The Lancet. 2006 Feb 4; 367(9508):436-42.
  • Salmon DA, Haber M, Gangarosa EJ, Phillips L, Smith N, Chen RT. Health consequences of religious and philosophical exemptions from immunization laws: individual and societal risks of measles. JAMA. 1999 July 7; 282(1): 47-53.

See all publications by Daniel Salmon

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Source: https://www.jhsph.edu/faculty/directory/profile/1015/daniel-salmon