Summer Vegetable Curry

Johns Hopkins Magazine

Summer Vegetable Curry | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Here and Abroad

In October, Johns Hopkins' Nitze School of Advanced International Studies named Jan Kiely the new American co-director of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center, a post-graduate program run jointly by Hopkins and Nanjing University.

Kiely, who was the director of the Furman in China Programs and an associate professor of history and Asian studies at Furman University in South Carolina, will be responsible, along with the Hopkins-Nanjing Center's Chinese co-director, for managing the center's affairs.

He will also teach courses at SAIS on the history of U.S.-Chinese social and cultural interaction.

A Bloomberg School of Public Health study, published in the September/October issue of Health Affairs, reports that the United States spends more on health care than other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries (OECD is an organization of developed countries committed to democracy and the market economy), due to higher health care prices and per capita incomes. Using 2004 data, the most recent available, the study found that per capita health care spending here was two and a half times greater than the OECD median; we spend 15.3 percent of the GDP on health care; and we have fewer physicians, nurses, and hospital beds per capita than the OECD median.

In September, JHPIEGO, an international health organization affiliated with Johns Hopkins University, was named NGO Leader of the Year by the Malaria Foundation for its work in Africa. The 2007 Malaria Awards also recognized the University Leader of the Year (the Bloomberg School), the Educational Document of the Year (the Bloomberg School's Malaria Course, one of its OpenCourseWare online lectures), Celebrity of the Year (Bono), Movie Actors of the Year (Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt), and the First Lady Malaria Advocate of the Year (Laura Bush), among others. — CP

Forever Altered

“This past summer, I was enrolled in four courses, including Systems Counseling and Consultation: Family, School, and Community, taught by Eric J. Green [assistant professor at the School of Education's Montgomery County campus].

From the moment I received the syllabus, I knew he set high expectations and that he would challenge us to do our best. Dr. Green has a way of making everyone feel comfortable. He has a reassuring voice and a one-of-a-kind sense of humor.

He also shares a lot of his own experiences with us-he brings his own everyday life into the classroom and connects it to the curriculum so that we are able to fully understand the concepts taught. His positive energy and welcoming nature are contagious.

Even after a strenuous day, I looked forward to sitting through one of his lectures.

“I already use what I learned in his course in my work as a teacher, collaborating and consulting with other staff members at the school-the principal, the management team-in order to better help students who might have behavioral problems, problems at home, or a language barrier. I can use the methods I learned in class to take a systematic approach to the consultation. If we don't collaborate, if we're not brainstorming, we don't have results.

“Besides being my instructor, Dr. Green is also now my adviser. Whenever I have a concern, I know I can rely on Dr. Green. He has guided me in making choices that have enabled me to thrive in the school counseling program.”

Jaclyn Smith is a third-grade teacher at the Fields Road Elementary School in Montgomery County. She is working toward her master's degree in school counseling at Johns Hopkins' School of Education.

Investigations

The Center for Africana Studies awarded grants of up to $1,500 each to six students last summer to support undergraduate and graduate research in African studies, African American studies, and African diaspora studies. Here's a look at two of the recipients:

Steffi Cerato, A&S '08: “A Glance at Savannah's Free Black Community in the Decades Before the Civil War”
Last summer, Cerato conducted research at the South Carolina and Georgia state archives on free blacks filing lawsuits in Southern courts prior to the 1860s.

In the course of that research, she found documents for Savannah that detailed substantial portions of the area's free black population.

The documents recorded their ages, occupations, residences, and birthplaces, as well as the names of white citizens who acted as legal representatives for the people listed in the registers. The result is a detailed picture of these communities in and around the city.

Cerato says the records speak volumes as to the size and economic diversity of the free black population and provide information about family ties and migration patterns.

Lindsey Reynolds, SPH, second-year PhD student: “Orphans, Vulnerability, and the Politics of Development Aid in South Africa”
Reynolds' doctoral research focuses on the role George W.

Bush's President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has in shaping children's programs in South Africa. PEPFAR guidelines define who is eligible for care-orphans and vulnerable children-and the services they can receive.

Reynolds is examining how these guidelines shape not just the programs but also the experiences of children and families in AIDS-affected communities.

Her work explores how a policy decision finds expression as it travels from Washington to local African communities and back. The grant enabled her to conduct preliminary research to plan her dissertation. —MB

Return to November 2007 Table of Contents

Source: https://pages.jh.edu/~jhumag/1107web/wholly2.html

Summer Vegetable Curry

Summer Vegetable Curry | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Jump to Recipe Print Recipe

Summer Vegetable Curry with Mango-Cilantro Salad comes together in just 30 minutes for a healthy weeknight win. Vegan, gluten free, and the perfect use of summer vegetables. 

The Best Vegetarian Curry

This weeknight curry is hearty, yet light, and makes delicious use of peak summer produce. Summer squash, corn, and bell peppers take center stage, which are all in abundance at farmers markets right now. To finish, a zippy mango-cilantro salad cuts through the richness of the broth to brighten things up.

This curry comes together in right around 30 minutes, making it perfectly suited for streamlined weeknight dinners. It also holds up incredibly well for leftovers, so weekday lunches are a breeze!

What Goes Into Vegetarian Curry?

This curry makes use of a few pantry staples to keep the ingredient list from getting too lofty. Here’s what you need:

  • Summer vegetables: A mix of zucchini, yellow squash, fresh (or frozen, thawed) corn, bell peppers, and carrots make a hearty and healthy base. However, you could use just about any vegetable you have on hand, including green peas, snap peas, and cherry tomatoes. The options are endless here, so feel free to mix it up!
  • Aromatics: Onion, garlic, and fresh ginger are the trifecta that create a strong base layer of flavor.
  • Store-bought green curry paste: Most versions contain ingredients popular at Asian markets galangal, lemongrass, and kaffir lime, which can effortlessly elevate homemade curries. One thing to note is that a lot of the spices in curry paste are fat soluble, which should be “bloomed” in hot fat to activate their flavor potential.
  • Coconut milk: To achieve quintessential richness, full-fat coconut milk is the way to go. However, not all brands are created equal, and I’ve had the best results with Whole Foods 365 Organic Coconut Milk. Alternatively, Chaokoh coconut milk is available at most Asian markets and is ultra silky.

A quick salad topper of sliced mango, cilantro, mint, and roasted peanuts gets garnished overtop to bring a welcomed brightness to this warming curry.

Is Curry Healthy?

A slew of colorful peak-season vegetables add an array of vitamins and phytonutrients, such as vitamins A, C, and potassium. The spices in curry powder also provide some powerful anti-inflammatory components. Although this recipe boasts heart-healthy fats, especially from nut butter, it’s also high in saturated fat from coconut milk.

As both a dietitian and avid home cook, I believe there’s a place for all types in fat in one’s diet. And even though I place an emphasis on heart-healthy fats, I save the more saturated forms for when it really impacts a dish curry.

What Should You Serve with Vegetarian Curry?

This curry is best served over rice to soak up all the flavor you build. A warm piece of naan on the side never hurt either. One thing to note, however, is that you should wait to add the mango salad topper until right before serving. Lastly, if you give this a try, be sure to tag #dishingouthealth so I can see your beautiful creations!

One Pot Moroccan Quinoa

Print Recipe Summer Vegetable Curry with Mango-Cilantro Salad comes together in just 30 minutes for a healthy weeknight win. Jamie Vespa MS, RD, LD/N

  • 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 3 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 1 tsp. minced fresh ginger
  • 2 Tbsp. green curry paste such as Thai Kitchen
  • 1 medium zucchini cut into ¼-inch-thick slices
  • 1 medium yellow squash cut into ¼-inch-thick slices
  • 2 large carrots sliced at a diagonal into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 red bell pepper sliced thin
  • 1/2 tsp. each salt and black pepper
  • 1 13.5 oz. can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 Tbsp. peanut or almond butter
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen/thawed corn
  • 1 cup chopped fresh mango
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint leaves
  • 3 Tbsp. roasted peanuts
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 tsp. fish sauce optional
  • White rice for serving
  • Heat 1 Tbsp. of the oil in a large high-sided skillet over medium heat. Cook onion 5 minutes, until softened. Add garlic, ginger, and curry paste; cook 1 to 2 minutes, stirring often, until fragrant. Add remaining 1 Tbsp oil, zucchini, squash, carrots, and bell pepper; cook 5 to 6 minutes, until vegetables develop some color. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Add coconut milk, broth, nut butter, and corn; bring mixture to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, and cook 15 minutes, uncovered, until vegetables soften and broth slightly thickens.
  • Meanwhile, prepare mango salad by combining mango, herbs, peanuts, lime juice, and fish sauce in a small bowl; gently toss.
  • Serve curry over rice and top with mango salad.

Source: https://dishingouthealth.com/summer-vegetable-curry/

Johns Hopkins Medicine Awards 12 Community Grants

Summer Vegetable Curry | Johns Hopkins Medicine

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Newswise — Paul B. Rothman, M.D., dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, on Wednesday presented 12 East Baltimore neighborhood-based groups with grants designed to help them in their missions of community revitalization, education, employment, health and public safety.

Last year, when the school of medicine celebrated its 125th anniversary, Rothman announced that the school would make $125,000 available to East Baltimore nonprofits that serve neighborhood residents.

At a reception held to present the awards, Rothman said, “This event is about celebrating an essential partnership, between East Baltimore and Johns Hopkins. These groups are doing inspired work focusing on education, jobs, community engagement, public safety and community health. With these grants, Johns Hopkins is helping to support the work that these organizations do every day.”

To be eligible for a grant, organizations needed to have programs located near The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Applicants submitted detailed proposals for how dollars would be used.

The grant review committee consisted of nine staff members from Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The committee awarded grants organizations’ track records of service, their past stewardship of grant dollars and their program proposals.

“There are so many extraordinary people working to make great things happen in East Baltimore,” says Kevin Sowers, president of Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine. “This is a wonderful example that illustrates the power of partnering across our community to make a difference, together.”

Ronald J. Daniels, president of the Johns Hopkins University, joined Rothman and Sowers in thanking the grantees for their commitment to East Baltimore.

“I am thrilled to support the crucial services these community groups provide to our neighbors and neighborhoods,” says Daniels.

“From support for parks to home ownership to access to high nutrition foods, these grants reflect Johns Hopkins’ shared belief in our city and its residents.” 

Grantees and brief descriptions of their projects

Group: The 6th Branch

Program: Henrietta Lacks Educational Park

Details: Continue development of a park rehabbed by 6th Branch and other neighborhood volunteers. A formerly neglected park in Johnston Square now has a swimming pool, gardens, bathrooms, a splash-pad and other features.

Group: Adopt-A-Block

Program: Home Renovation and Donation, 2500 block of E. Hoffman Street

Details: Adopt-A-Block has completely renovated a vacant home, obtained from the Vacant-to-Values Program. The home is donated to an underserved person/household from the community. This year’s giveaway will be on the 2500 block of E.

Hoffman Street. Clothing and food are also made available. Job counseling and placement, housing improvements, educational opportunities, drug counseling, sports programs and many other services are offered to residents of the block.

Group: Baltimore Farm-to-Clinic

Program: Healthy foods and nutrition education

Details: Partnering with Johns Hopkins’ East Baltimore Medical Center, Farm-to-Clinic will deliver fresh vegetables free of charge to the East Baltimore Medical Center for distribution to vulnerable patients with health conditions impacted by inadequate nutrition. The program also offers monthly cooking classes at the center to demonstrate how to prepare vegetables in a healthy and flavorful way.

Group: Baltimore Urban Leadership Foundation

Program: Generation E4

Details: Summer-school education for East Baltimore students, with a focus on science, technology, engineering, arts and math, or “STEAM.” E4 (Education, Enrichment, Engineering and Entrepreneurship) is a 34-week after-school and 6-week summer program that uses a collaborative approach to close the achievement gap for low-income and low-performing students in grades 1 through 6.

Group: Bmore4Kidz

Program: Young Makers Program

Details: A hands-on STEAM program is provided to 3rd-5th grade students at Henderson Hopkins Elementary school every Tuesday and Thursday and a summer Makers Camp open to all 3rd-8th grade students in East Baltimore. Bmore4Kidz also offers one-day workshops for community members of all ages.

Group: The Caroline Center

Program: Career Training and Support

Details: Caroline Center offers its holistic education and career-skills training program to capable women who can most benefit from the program and would not otherwise have the opportunity. The center’s mission is to empower each woman to reach the fullness of her potential so that she can create a future of hope for herself and her family.

Group: Charm City Care Connection

Program: Harm-Reduction Drop-In Center

Details: In recent years, there has been an increase in illness and death among people who use drugs in East Baltimore.

To improve engagement with this population, Charm City Care Connection opened a harm reduction drop-in center in February 2019.

 The space includes syringe exchange, naloxone distribution, community meals and leisure activities, in addition to ongoing health screening and case management services.

Group: Friends of Betty Hyatt Park (FOBHP)

Program: Fall Community Day

Details: The organization will host a free Fall Community Day in Betty Hyatt Park on October 5. This event will have free music and face painting, as well as seasonally themed games and kids’ craft tables.

FOBHP will provide free donuts and cider, and will have food trucks present for additional food options.

Volunteers will give away pumpkins to encourage neighbors to beautify their front stoops or blocks and provide information about the FOBHP’s ongoing projects.

Group: Monument Street Merchants Association

Program: Monument Street Merchants Basketball League

Details: The association sponsors a structured athletic program for neighborhood youth, as well as SAT prep, college and career readiness, and financial literacy. The League has a boys and a girls division and has games three nights per week. The opportunities, enrichment and relationships established through this program contribute to reducing youth crime and violence in the neighborhood.

Group: Sisters Circle

Program: Supporting adolescent girls through physical, emotional and academic changes

Details: Sisters Circle is a comprehensive program model that powerfully combines dedicated, long-term mentoring with exceptional programming and resources.

Through monthly cultural, educational and recreational events, Sisters Circle students gain exposure to the world beyond their doorstep and benefit from a community of support.

One-on-one, mentor-mentee matches are established in early middle school to build a foundation of trust and provide exposure to female role models.

Group: Baltimore Curriculum Project

Program: Southeast Baltimore Food Access Collaborative

Details: To address food insecurity and access to healthy food for local families by providing fruits and vegetables, and access to cooking, cleaning and storage supplies for food.

Group: Youth Kings Leadership Academy (YKLA)

Program: Learning Beyond the Classroom

Details: YKLA offers a 20-week after-school program that takes place for two 90-min sessions per week and one Saturday each month.

Examples of activities include immersive learning experiences through virtual reality, critical reading of culturally relevant texts and songs, empowerment through encouraging mantras, physical-strength building activities, digital individualized literacy interventions, development of public speaking skills, use of computer science to develop games, and youth-led solution building to pertinent school and community issues.

Source: https://www.newswise.com/articles/johns-hopkins-medicine-awards-12-community-grants/sc-rsmn

Cyclospora cayetanensis

Summer Vegetable Curry | Johns Hopkins Medicine

— The first section of this topic is shown below —

  • Obligate intracellular coccidian parasite; infects epithelial cells of small intestine. Destroys brush border and alters mucosal architecture.[4]
  • Excreted in stool as oocysts (spherical, 8-10 μm in diameter), which may be shed intermittantly and at low levels. Sporulation (maturation of oocysts) occurs outside host and takes 7-12d.
  • Transmitted by fecal-contaminated soil, food and water. Humans only known host and reservoir. Human-to-human transmission unly as excreted oocysts must sporulate before becoming infectious.
  • Both sporadic infections and outbreaks occur. Frequency peaks during spring & summer in the U.S., associated with fruits and vegetables, i.e., raspberries, mixed salad greens, cilantro, and basil.[5]
    • 2018 outbreak season comprised 2 multistate outbreaks and 761 laboratory-confirmed cases.[6]
  • Lack of validated molecular typing tool limits outbreak investigations.[6]
  • Endemic areas, i.e., Peru, Nepal, Haiti, Guatemala, Indonesia. Low-level endemicity in US cannot be excluded.

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  • Obligate intracellular coccidian parasite; infects epithelial cells of small intestine. Destroys brush border and alters mucosal architecture.[4]
  • Excreted in stool as oocysts (spherical, 8-10 μm in diameter), which may be shed intermittantly and at low levels. Sporulation (maturation of oocysts) occurs outside host and takes 7-12d.
  • Transmitted by fecal-contaminated soil, food and water. Humans only known host and reservoir. Human-to-human transmission unly as excreted oocysts must sporulate before becoming infectious.
  • Both sporadic infections and outbreaks occur. Frequency peaks during spring & summer in the U.S., associated with fruits and vegetables, i.e., raspberries, mixed salad greens, cilantro, and basil.[5]
    • 2018 outbreak season comprised 2 multistate outbreaks and 761 laboratory-confirmed cases.[6]
  • Lack of validated molecular typing tool limits outbreak investigations.[6]
  • Endemic areas, i.e., Peru, Nepal, Haiti, Guatemala, Indonesia. Low-level endemicity in US cannot be excluded.

There's more to see — the rest of this entry is available only to subscribers.

Spacek, Lisa. “Cyclospora Cayetanensis.” Johns Hopkins HIV Guide, 2019. Johns Hopkins Guide, www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensis. Spacek L. Cyclospora cayetanensis. Johns Hopkins HIV Guide. 2019. https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensis. Accessed May 18, 2020.Spacek, L. (2019). Cyclospora cayetanensis. In Johns Hopkins HIV Guide Retrieved May 18, 2020, from https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensisSpacek L. Cyclospora Cayetanensis [Internet]. In: Johns Hopkins HIV Guide. ; 2019. [cited 2020 May 18]. Available from: https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensis.* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-caseMLAAMAAPAVANCOUVERTY – ELECT1 – Cyclospora cayetanensisID – 545047A1 – Spacek,Lisa,M.D., Ph.D.Y1 – 2019/07/01/BT – Johns Hopkins HIV GuideUR – https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensisDB – Johns Hopkins GuideDP – Unbound MedicineER –

Source: https://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/view/Johns_Hopkins_HIV_Guide/545047/all/Cyclospora_cayetanensis