Topped Potatoes

The American Nurse Project

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Meet the nurses from this location:

AMY BROWNThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDGynecologic Oncology

WATCH VIDEOS:

AMY BROWN, BSN, RN, OCN : Women are the Caregivers of the World>AMY BROWN, BSN, RN, OCN : Overwhelmed and Overworked vs. Being Present>AMY BROWN, BSN, RN, OCN : On Being a Camp Nurse>AMY BROWN, BSN, RN, OCN : I’m Proud to be a Bedside Nurse>PAM DODGEThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDPediatric Intensive Care

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PAM DODGE, RN : This Is My Family>PAM DODGE, RN : Doing What Needs to Be Done>BRIAN FOWLER
The Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MD Emergency Nurse  

WATCH VIDEOS:

BRIAN FOWLER, RN, NCIIM — Save lives first, ask questions later>BRIAN FOWLER, RN, NCIIM — Reflections on my oncology experiences>BRIAN FOWLER, RN, NCIIM — What trauma really looks >BRIAN FOWLER, RN, NCIIM — The harsh reality of gun violence>KAREN FRANKThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDNeonatal Intensive Care

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KAREN FRANK, RNC, MS, CNS : Back to Basics>KAREN FRANK, RNC, MS, CNS : When One Twin Survives>KAREN FRANK, RNC, MS, CNS : Death in the N.I.C.U>MELISSA MASONThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDEmergency Department

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MELISSA MASON, BSN, RN : Disaster Triage in the E.D.>AMANDA OWENThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDWound Nursing

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AMANDA OWEN, BSN, RN, CWCN : Holding onto False Hope>AMANDA OWEN, BSN, RN, CWCN : Dying on Their Own Terms>AMANDA OWEN, BSN, RN, CWCN : On Being Merciful>MICHELLE PATCHThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDPatient/Staff Safety

WATCH VIDEOS:

MICHELLE PATCH, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC : Healthcare Workers as Second Victims>MICHELLE PATCH, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC : Patients with a History of Violence>ALLISYN PLETCHThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDPsychiatryEating Disorders

WATCH VIDEOS:

ALLISYN PLETCH, MSN, RN, NCIII: Obesity and Learning Portion Control>ALLISYN PLETCH, MSN, RN NCIII : Nursing Machines vs. Nursing Patients>ALLISYN PLETCH, MSN, RN NCIII : Learning From Patients>ALLISYN PLETCH, MS, RN, NCIII : A History of Eating Disorders>TRAVIS SIMONETTIThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDGeneral Medicine

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RANIMARIA TOLEDOThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDEmergency Department

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RHONDA WYSKIELThe Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, MDSurgical Intensive Care

WATCH VIDEOS:

RHONDA WYSKIEL, BSN, RN, NCIII : Family>RHONDA WYSKIEL, BSN, RN, NCIII : Donna’s Law>

For more than a century, The Johns Hopkins Hospital has had a tradition and mission of striving to lead the world in the diagnosis and treatment of disease and to train tomorrow’s great physicians, nurses and scientists.

Above all, we aim to provide the highest quality health care and service to all of our patients. The Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center Tower and the Sheik Zayed Adult Tower opened May 1, 2012, adding approximately 1.6 million square feet of state-of the-art medical facilities.

The 12-story towers mark a new era for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Nationally and Internationally recognized Specialty Care,  The Johns Hopkins Hospital is globally acclaimed for its exceptional services and programs. For 21 consecutive years, it has topped U.S.

News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” in the magazine’s annual ranking of America’s Best Hospitals.

Part of a Premier Integrated System

The Johns Hopkins Hospital, founded in 1889, and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, created in 1893, form the nucleus of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

This is one of the world’s premier, integrated health systems, with six hospitals, four community-based health care and surgery centers, more than 30 primary health care sites throughout Maryland, managed care and home care services, and numerous strategic collaboration, affiliate and management agreements overseas, and multiple short-term consulting projects.

Source: https://americannurseproject.com/locations/the-johns-hopkins-hospital/

The Johns Hopkins Hospital

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

For more than a century, The Johns Hopkins Hospital has had a tradition and mission of striving to lead the world in the diagnosis and treatment of disease and to train tomorrow’s great physicians, nurses and scientists.

Above all, we aim to provide the highest quality health care and service to all of our patients. The Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center Tower and the Sheik Zayed Adult Tower opened May 1, 2012, adding approximately 1.6 million square feet of state-of the-art medical facilities.

The 12-story towers mark a new era for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Nationally and Internationally recognized Specialty Care, The Johns Hopkins Hospital is globally acclaimed for its exceptional services and programs. For 21 consecutive years, it has topped U.S.

News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” in the magazine’s annual ranking of America’s Best Hospitals.

Part of a Premier Integrated System
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, founded in 1889, and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, created in 1893, form the nucleus of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

This is one of the world’s premier, integrated health systems, with six hospitals, four community-based health care and surgery centers, more than 30 primary health care sites throughout Maryland, managed care and home care services, and numerous strategic collaboration, affiliate and management agreements overseas, and multiple short-term consulting projects.

www.hopkinsmedicine.org

Meet the nurses from this location:Emergency Department Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalEmergency Department Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalMichael Arciaga, RN, NCIIMBoth of Michael's parents were in the medical profession back in their native Philippines, and they encouraged him to follow their path. Working as a nurse in the ER, Michael has seen his fair share of death, and knows intimately that an ER gurney is not where you want to end your days. He has also been personally touched by the death and dying experience, and has fought to honor the final wishes of several of his own ailing family members. http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5719_web-549×366.jpg Acceptance Choices Family Dignity Fear Pain Choices Palliative Care Nurse Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Johns Hopkins Hospital

Palliative Care Nurse Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Johns Hopkins Hospital

Lynn has worked as both a hospice and Palliative Care nurse at some of the premiere medical institutions in the country. However, when her own father lay dying at the end of a prolonged illness, she realized that the emotions she sees her patients' families go through are even more complicated than she had imagined. http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5455_web-549×366.jpg Acceptance Choices Dignity Fear Family Pain Family Critical Care Transport Nurse and Team Educator
Johns Hopkins LifelineCritical Care Transport Nurse and Team Educator
Johns Hopkins LifelineShawn Brast, MSN, RN, CCRN, NRPShawn works in critical care transport, where he spends most of his time trying to save lives by getting patients to the hospital to receive care. In the past few years, however, he has also helped develop a program in which he takes critically ill patients from the hospital back to their homes so they can die peacefully at home on their own terms.http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5652_web-549×366.jpg Choices Family Acceptance Choices Emergency Department Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalEmergency Department Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalBetween the ICU, oncology and the ER, Brian has 20 years of nursing under his belt. He currently spends his nights in the very busy Johns Hopkins ED, where he and his colleagues see everything from sudden heart attacks to violent shootings. He wishes young men and women that have been taught to glorify gun violence could see what he sees every night, so they could truly understand what it means to “get shot.”http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5597_web-549×366.jpg Choices Family Acceptance Pain Choices Dignity Cardiac ICU staff Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalCardiac ICU staff Nurse
The Johns Hopkins HospitalCaitlin McGeehan, RN, BSNCaitlin works in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Johns Hopkins, where her own grandfather was the recipient of a successful heart transplant in the early 1980s. He was a shining example to her of someone who used his “borrowed time” to live wisely and prepare for his family for his inevitable death. In her work, she feels it is a clinician's responsibility to communicate candidly with patients about their treatment options so that they can, in turn, make choices that optimize quality of life. http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5521_web-549×366.jpg Acceptance Choices Dignity Family Pain Choices Fear Clinical Nurse Specialist, Palliative Care
The Johns Hopkins HospitalClinical Nurse Specialist, Palliative Care
The Johns Hopkins HospitalRita found herself drawn to work that focused on death and dying after her newborn son died from a heart defect. In the 30 years since, she has found a calling in helping fellow clinicians talk about death and dying with patients in a sensitive and efficacious manner. http://dyinginamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/C1_5416_web-549×366.jpg Acceptance Choices Family Choices

Source: http://dyinginamerica.org/locations/the-johns-hopkins-hospital/

Local health offical gives COVID-19 update

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

HASTINGS, Neb. (KSNB) – The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 has topped 185,000 worldwide. That's according to Johns Hopkins University & Medicine Coronavirus Resource Center.

Just in the United States, cases have reached over 4,600 with more than 80 confirmed deaths. Nebraska sits at 18.

To slow the spread of COVID-19, government and health officials are now urging people to practice social distancing.

“We can all do our part to make a difference in our communities.

This virus spreads from human-to-human and if we aren't close together, it can't spread,” said South Heartland Health District's Michele Bever.

“So what we're trying to do is reduce the curve of spread so that not as many people are impacted. That would help us weather it and we'll also help reduce the impact on the healthcare system.”

Even if you are young, or otherwise healthy, you are at risk and your activities increase the risk for others. So how do you do your part to slow the spread of the virus?

According to the president's guidelines: – work or engage in schooling from home whenever possible- avoid social gatherings in groups of more than 10 people – avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants and food courts- avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips and social visits- do not visit nursing homes or retirement or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance

– practice good hygiene: wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water, avoid touching your face, sneeze or cough into a tissue, disinfect frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible

During an interview Tuesday on Local4 Today, South Heartland District Health Department's Michele Bever said as of right now, there are no confirmed cases in Adams, Clay, Nuckolls and Webster counties.

“Once the testing became available in the state, there were tests available. The providers started ordering when there was suspicious or travelers that had gone to certain countries and we have done some testing in our district.”

She is encouraging people who have traveled to limit their public interactions and self-monitor for symptoms.

“If people don't do this for themselves, do it for the more vulnerable,” Bever said. “You want to protect them.”

As we continue to learn more about COVID-19, we wanted to help you understand the importance of taking this pandemic seriously.

While some say COVID-19 is just the flu, that's not the case.

Bever said the seasonal flu is caused by the influenza virus while COVID-19 is caused by the coronavirus. She said there have been other coronaviruses before but not this one. This one is new.

“We haven't seen it before. There's no vaccine,” she said.

She said there's not enough kits to test everyone who is not symptomatic. Adding that for a large percentage of people, they may only feel minor symptoms, but that doesn't mean you aren't exposing others.

Bever said if people follow the methods/guidelines that have been put in place, it will reduce the spread and eventually the virus will have no where to go.

If you have cough, shortness of breath or any other symptoms, you should quarantine immediately and call by phone your healthcare provider or the health department to determine your next step.

She adds that companies will need to work on new policies to address how employees can work from home as well as revise for sick leave and changes.

“These are proven practices that help slow pandemics,” Bever adds.

Source: https://www.ksnblocal4.com/content/news/Local-health-offical-gives-COVID-19-update-568865131.html

US coronavirus cases surge tenfold in a week to 50,000, global infections soar past 400,000

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

COVID-19 cases surpassed 400,000 worldwide on Tuesday, while U.S. cases topped 50,000 as the virus spreads more rapidly across the world.

The total number of global cases now stands at 407,485 as of 1:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The virus emerged in Wuhan, China, in December. It has since spread to most countries around the world, according to the World Health Organization.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases topped 200,000 last week. In the past three days, more than 100,000 new cases have been identified. The virus has now killed more than 18,200 people around the world, while more than 104,200 people have recovered from COVID-19, according to Hopkins.

While new infections and deaths from the virus appear to be slowing in Italy, new cases surged Tuesday in Spain, where more than 6,000 new cases and more than 500 new deaths were reported.

In the U.S., the virus has infected more than 50,206 people as of 2:15 p.m. ET and killed at least 600 people, according to Hopkins. New York state, which has 25,665 confirmed cases as of Tuesday, according to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, accounts for nearly half of all cases in the U.S.

However, the number of actual cases in the country is ly significantly higher, officials have acknowledged. Testing in the U.S. has been hampered by delays and a restrictive diagnostic criteria that limited who could get tested. 

Confirmed U.S. cases passed 5,000 just one week ago. On March 1, there were roughly 100 confirmed cases in the U.S. 

Local and state officials in the U.S. have warned that the rapid spread of the virus will put the U.S. health-care system to the test. In New York, Cuomo has called for tens of thousands more hospital beds and ventilators, potentially life-saving devices for hospitalized COVID-19 patients. On Tuesday, he warned other states to prepare for their own epidemics.

“New York is the canary in the coal mine. New York is going first. We have the highest and fastest rate of infection,” he said at a news briefing, adding that what's happening in New York will spread to California, Washington and other states from there. 

WHO officials said Monday that the spread of COVID-19 is picking up speed around the world.

“The pandemic is accelerating,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press briefing from the organization's Geneva headquarters. “It took 67 days from the first reported case to reach 100,000 cases, 11 days for second 100,000 cases, and just four days for the third 100,000 cases.”

Global infections topped 300,000 on Saturday, three days ago, according to Hopkins data.

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Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/24/global-coronavirus-cases-cross-400000-doubling-in-a-week-as-pandemic-accelerates.html

BIRMINGHAM, AL – (November 16, 2005) – Emageon Inc. (NASDAQ: EMAG), a leading provider of enterprise visual medical systems to hospitals and healthcare networks, announced today that it has entered into a digital healthcare information management agreement with The Johns Hopkins Hospital, a world-renowned medical center headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland.

Johns Hopkins will use Emageon's clinical content management product to provide DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine, the global standard for medical imaging) archiving capabilities and web distribution and visualization of images and information to treating physicians in its acute care hospitals and clinics.

“We are very pleased to initiate this relationship with one of the country's most prestigious hospital systems,” said Chuck Jett, Emageon's Chairman and CEO. “We have been very impressed with the technical team at Johns Hopkins and are excited they share our vision of a centralized open archive with local image management and enterprise distribution.”

About The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System

Founded in 1889 by Baltimore banker Johns Hopkins, The Johns Hopkins Hospital is recognized as America's top hospital.

This academic medical center is home to The Johns Hopkins Heart Institute, the Brady Urological Institute, the Kimmel Cancer Center, the Wilmer Eye Institute and The Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

The Johns Hopkins Health System also includes The Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Howard County General Hospital and numerous outpatient facilities and clinics.

This year, for the 15th year in a row, The Johns Hopkins Hospital has topped U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of “America's Best Hospitals” and again ranked in the top 10 in 16 of the 17 specialty categories listed.

The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have become world renowned for excellence in patient care for breakthrough discoveries in medical research and as a training ground for the nation's finest physicians, nurses, public health experts and other health care professionals.

About Emageon Inc.

Emageon provides an enterprise-level advanced visualization and infrastructure solution for the clinical analysis and management of digital medical images within multi-hospital networks, community hospitals and diagnostic imaging centers.

Emageon's web-enabled software provides physicians in multiple medical specialties with dynamic tools to manipulate and analyze images in two and three dimensions. With these tools physicians have the ability to better understand internal anatomic structure and pathology, which can improve clinical diagnoses, disease screening and therapy planning.

Emageon's open standards-based solution is designed to help customers improve staff productivity, automate complex medical imaging workflow, lower total cost of ownership and provide better service to physicians and patients. On November 1, 2005, Emageon announced that it had acquired Camtronics Medical Systems, Ltd.

Camtronics, which was formerly a wholly owned subsidiary of Analogic Corporation, is a leading provider of cardiology image and information management systems.

For more information, please visit www.emageon.com.

This press release contains forward-looking statements about Emageon which represent the Company's current views with respect to, among other things, future events and financial performance. Any forward-looking statements contained in this press release are Emageon's historical performance and on current plans, beliefs and expectations.

Actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements as a result of various risks, uncertainties and other factors beyond its control.

These risks, uncertainties and other factors include, among others, the risk that it may not compete successfully against larger competitors, risks associated with its history of operating losses, the risk that it may not manage its growth effectively, risks associated with its reliance on continuing relationships with large customers, the risk of significant product errors or product failures, its reliance on reseller arrangements for important components of its solution, the risk that it may not respond effectively to changes in its industry, its customers' reliance on third party reimbursements, and the potential impact on its business of FDA regulations and other applicable health care regulations. Additional information concerning these and other factors that could affect Emageon's financial and operating results may be found under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in the Company's Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2004, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 31, 2005. Emageon undertakes no obligation to update these forward-looking statements or any other information provided in this press release except as may be required by law.

Source: http://aurorafunds.com/news/portfolio/2005/089.html

Johns Hopkins APL Biologists Sequencing Genome of the Virus Causing COVID-19

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

March 23, 2020

Peter Thielen, front, works with Tom Mehoke on immediate sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 genome, the virus that causes COVID-19, at the Johns Hopkins Hospital molecular diagnostics laboratory.

Credit: Johns Hopkins APL

Peter Thielen, front, and Tom Mehoke, biologists from Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory prepare a hand-held DNA sequencer for operation at the molecular diagnostics laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Thielen and Mehoke are working to immediately sequence the genome of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19, from positive tests taken at JHH.

Credit: Johns Hopkins APL

Heba Mostafa, Assistant Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, joins APL biologists Tom Mehoke, left, and Peter Thielen as the team initiates a sequencing of the genome of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19.

Credit: Johns Hopkins APL

A loading buffer is injected into a hand-held DNA sequencer to prepare it for operation.

Credit: Johns Hopkins APL

Inside the molecular diagnostics laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, while health care workers and hospital staff work tirelessly to process patient tests to detect the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic, two biologists from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) are working alongside them.

Peter Thielen and Tom Mehoke, members of APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, are waiting for the positive tests. Certainly, positive tests are no cause for celebration; but for Thielen and Mehoke, they are an invaluable sample — and a key to learning more about the rapidly spreading virus.

With software and molecular biology approaches developed in part at APL in Laurel, Maryland, Thielen and Mehoke are using hand-held DNA sequencers to conduct immediate on-site sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 genome — the virus that causes COVID-19.

“This information allows us to track the evolution of the virus,” Thielen said. “It gives us a sense of where the new cases coming into Baltimore could’ve originated, and insight into how long transmission may have occurred undetected. There are a lot of things we can glean from that.”

Topping that list is the ability to see how quickly the virus mutates — integral information for mapping its spread, as well as developing an effective vaccine. Influenza, for example, mutates constantly. That’s why it’s necessary to vaccinate against different strains of the flu each year.

The virus causing COVID-19, Thielen said, does not appear to be mutating as fast.

“When this virus was first sequenced in China, that information was helpful in starting the process to develop a vaccine,” Thielen explained.

“What we’re doing informs whether or not the virus is mutating away from that original sequence, and how quickly.

the mutation rate, early data indicates that this would ly be a single vaccine rather than one that needs to be updated each year, the flu shot.”

In the near-term, the mutations inform how the virus is spreading.

With the United States continuing to ramp up testing and mitigation capabilities, the ability to understand how outbreaks are linked gives public health departments another tool for evaluation.

Mutations can explain how long the virus may have gone undetected and the supposition that there are ly far more cases than diagnosed, and can advise on what measures to put in place (such as the social-distancing efforts and closings that are ongoing nationwide).

Sequencing of the virus’ genome is being performed by scientists all over the globe as they work to trace the source of regional outbreaks. In northern California, for example, news reports suggest that genome sequencing has linked the Bay Area outbreak to the Grand Princess cruise ship, which linked back to the virus found in Washington State, which ly came from China.

That’s the type of insight — a DNA fingerprint, if you will — that Thielen and Mehoke will gain as more virus genomes are sequenced from the Baltimore and Washington, D.C., regions.

As part of the Johns Hopkins Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, Thielen and Mehoke have sequenced the genome of influenza for years in their work at APL, and are currently transitioning similar capabilities directly to the diagnostic laboratory at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

They’ve completed analysis of the first four COVID-19 samples, with upward of 100 in the queue from the Baltimore/Washington, D.C. area, and expect many more in the coming weeks.

Operating remotely using just hand-held sequencers and laptop computers, and at the mercy of how long the tests take to return results before they can be transferred to them, Thielen and Mehoke’s initial method was multiday. But, at the end of last week they validated a new process that enables same-day sequencing — one that can be done by the hospital staff members already administering the diagnostic tests.

Ultimately, it’s what they’ve been preparing for.

In the last nine months, Thielen and Mehoke held two workshops with the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center to help train scientists from low- and middle-income countries on how to use the hand-held sequencers to do this work.

“We were doing that to prepare as many researchers as we can, in the event that there would be a future pandemic,” Thielen said. “It’s here.”

The latest workshop was held last week, where they trained stateside researchers to do the same type of on-site sequencing in their own laboratories. Participants included researchers at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the U.S.

Naval Research Laboratory, the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Auburn University, the University of California, Berkeley, and Kansas State University.

Due to recent national travel restrictions, it was held virtually.

Media contact: Amanda Zrebiec, 240-592-2794, Amanda.Zrebiec@jhuapl.edu

The Applied Physics Laboratory, a not-for-profit division of The Johns Hopkins University, meets critical national challenges through the innovative application of science and technology. For more information, visit www.jhuapl.edu.

Source: https://www.jhuapl.edu/PressRelease/200323b

Essays That Worked | Undergraduate Admissions | Johns Hopkins

Topped Potatoes | Johns Hopkins Medicine

“If you had to choose one food to eat for the rest of your life, what would it be?”

Having had this question asked of me many a time, I realize that such an inquiry must be considered practically. The correct answer would keep me happily sustained for the rest of my years, whereas the wrong choice could leave me tormented until I wither away from monotony.

If I chose macaroni and cheese, per se, I’d be trapped consuming glutinous pasta, tacky milk-fat, yellow dye No.5, and copious amounts of sodium, forever. But if instead, I call upon my contentment understandings and assess my options accordingly, I may arrive at an indefectible conclusion.

And after much deliberation, I believe that I have come to such a response: potatoes.

These tubers are the perfect sustenance due not only to their nutritional qualities but, most notably, to their remarkable versatility. Potatoes may be prepared in a myriad of dishes.

Creamy mashed-potatoes come first to mind, with their fluffy hills of whipped-bliss gracing one’s tongue so delicately.

The thought of golden tater-tots follows; deep-fried potatoes cooked perfectly so as to create a slow crunch when chewed. Then are characteristic french-fries—shoestring or steak, skin on or off.

Baked-potatoes, latkes, hash-browns, gnocchi—all respectable meals. And one mustn’t forget potato-chips when searching for alight snack.

Oh potatoes, how I love you. And when asked what to eat exclusively for the rest of my life, I will enthusiastically respond “potatoes!”, for by picking one, I choose an abundance.

To a casual onlooker, this question may appear inconsequential in its hypothetical nature, but as they say; you are what you eat.

My inclination towards the varied is not contained to my food habits—it is a recurring theme throughout my life. I regularly switch from my mom’s house to my dad’s. I’ve moved twelve times.

I have a fifteen-year-old sister and a two-year-old brother. I’m a dog and a cat person.

This variation tends not to leave me with an aversion to commitment, but a disposition towards diversity. I am interested in many things. So one must understand how I have struggled, faced throughout my education with the question, “If you had to choose one subject to study, one occupation to pursue, one thing to do, for the rest of your life, what would it be?”

I love to play viola; I get a rush communicating without-words to my quartet members in order to convey a musical message. I am at my happiest reading a good book; their complex stories captivate me and I aspire to write a novel of my own.

I want to make laws that improve my country; all people should have a shot at the American dream. I am passionate about protecting the environment; reducing our effect on global-warming is of the utmost importance to me.

I want to help those in need; people still don’t have access to clean water and I want to use my privilege to help change that. I strive to become fluent in Spanish; traveling the world is a dream of mine.

Recently, I have discovered that I really to code; I’m sure in the coming years I will explore things I didn’t know I was interested in.

I don’t have an answer to what exactly it is I want to do for the rest of my life. I love English and political science, but I have yet to find such an all-encompassing response as potatoes. What I’ve realized though, is that I don’t have to sacrifice all for one.

From each of my interests I learn things that contribute to who I am and shape how I see the world. Eventually, I will focus my path.

And when I do have an answer, I will go forth with the knowledge I’ve gathered from each of my varied interests; and I will never stop learning.

Source: https://apply.jhu.edu/application-process/essays-that-worked/