Traveling with Chronic Conditions

Johns Hopkins Medicine and Walgreens Expand Health Care Collaboration with Opening of New Store, Bringing Health and Wellness Services to Campus Community

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

DEERFIELD, Ill.

& BALTIMORE, November 22, 2013 – Officials from Walgreens (NYSE: WAG) (Nasdaq: WAG) and Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) today celebrate the expansion of a unique collaboration between the two parties, with the grand opening of a new Walgreens store adjacent to the JHM campus.

The store project is a joint effort to bring new health and wellness programs and other health care services to the surrounding community, furthering the partnership between Johns Hopkins and Walgreens to explore the development of new models for improving overall patient care.

“This store is an ideal environment for our pharmacists and the Healthcare Clinic nurse practitioners to work with Johns Hopkins Medicine faculty to further innovate in health care while providing greater access to services for the community,” said Kermit Crawford, Walgreens president of pharmacy, health and wellness. “We’re proud of the great work that’s being done through this unique collaboration that led to this store’s opening as a model of our partnership to help students, staff and area residents get, stay and live well.”

The new Walgreens “Well Experience” store offers health services, as well as healthy food options and a full selection of other daily living products.

In addition to its pharmacy, the store brings other health care resources to the community with a new Healthcare Clinic, staffed by board-certified nurse practitioners, marking the first Walgreens in-store retail clinic in the state of Maryland.

The store is located at the Science and Technology Park adjacent to the Johns Hopkins medical campus at 900 N. Washington St., Baltimore.

New services now available include:

  • Student health services – clinical, pharmacy and retail products and services
  • Healthcare Clinic – with extended evening and weekend hours, providing assessment, treatment and management of certain chronic conditions, as well as care for minor illness and injuries, immunizations, preventive health screenings/counseling and more
  • Chronic disease education and awareness programs

Other programs and services planned to be offered soon include:

  • Smoking cessation
  • HIV testing – part of a Walgreens program supporting people living with HIV/AIDS, offering accessible health and wellness guidance and testing programs/services
  • Travel immunizations

“These programs will provide a novel approach to population health and medical services,” said Patricia M.C. Brown, J.D., president of Johns Hopkins HealthCare. “They will benefit not only the surrounding community, but also form the level of health care collaboration that could serve as a national model.”

“We have been working with Walgreens for more than a year to develop collaborative approaches to population-based research which utilize the strengths of both organizations to improve health outcomes for patients,” said Jeanne M. Clark, M.D.

, director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“The opening of the new Walgreens store increases our potential to advance population health in the community and across the country and is a mechanism to expand our relationship with Walgreens.”

Walgreens to Provide Initial Funding for Brancati Center for Advancement of Community Care

As an extension of the collaboration with Johns Hopkins, Walgreens today announced it will provide the initial funding for the new Brancati Center for the Advancement of Community Care.

The center, part of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will develop and test new models of collaborative care to improve the health of communities using the unique skills and perspectives of a diverse group of clinicians including pharmacists, nurse practitioners and others.

The center is named in honor of the late Frederick L. Brancati, M.D., Johns Hopkins’ longtime professor of medicine and epidemiology and director of the Division of General Internal Medicine.

Brancati was an internationally recognized expert on epidemiology and the prevention of Type 2 diabetes.

Walgreens and Johns Hopkins will work together toward a goal of raising $10-$15 million in contributions over the next five years.

“Pharmacists and nurse practitioners are playing a critical role in health care today, and we share the Center’s mission on a local, national and global scale to further the study and development of new health care models that allow these clinicians to practice at the top of their licensure and training while serving as a part of patients’ care teams,” said Harry Leider, M.D., Walgreens chief medical officer.

About Walgreens

As the nation's largest drugstore chain with fiscal 2013 sales of $72 billion, Walgreens (www.walgreens.com) vision is to be the first choice in health and daily living for everyone in America, and beyond.

Each day, Walgreens provides more than 6 million customers the most convenient, multichannel access to consumer goods and services and trusted, cost-effective pharmacy, health and wellness services and advice in communities across America. Walgreens scope of pharmacy services includes retail, specialty, infusion, medical facility and mail service, along with respiratory services.

These services improve health outcomes and lower costs for payers including employers, managed care organizations, health systems, pharmacy benefit managers and the public sector. The company operates 8,131 drugstores in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Take Care Health Systems is a Walgreens subsidiary that is the largest and most comprehensive manager of worksite health and wellness centers, provider practices, and in-store convenient care clinics, with more than 750 locations throughout the country.

Source: https://news.walgreens.com/press-releases/general-news/johns-hopkins-medicine-and-walgreens-expand-health-care-collaboration-with-opening-of-new-store-bringing-health-and-wellness-services-to-campus-community.htm

CDC tells people over 60 or who have chronic illnesses diabetes to stock up on goods and buckle down for a lengthy stay at home

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

  • The CDC is expanding its guidance for people at extreme risk of serious illness, those over 60 or with underlying health conditions. 
  • Those over the age of 60 should start stocking up on enough groceries and medications to have on hand, the CDC said. 
  • Those at greatest risk of serious illness should stay home as much as possible if COVID-19 comes to their community, the CDC said. 

Many Americans will be exposed to COVID-19 over the next year or so with many people in the U.S. getting sick, a top CDC official said Monday, recommending that people over 60 and anyone with chronic medical conditions buckle down for a lengthy stay home. 

“This virus is capable of spreading easily and sustainably from person to person … and there's essentially no immunity against this virus in the population,” Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters on a conference call, citing World Health Organization data that studied more than 70,000 cases in China.

“It's fair to say that, as the trajectory of the outbreak continues, many people in the United States will at some point in time, either this year or next, be exposed to this virus and there's a good chance many will become sick,” she said. Most people won't develop serious symptoms, but 15% to 20% of the people who are exposed to the virus get severely sick, she said. 

Of the 70,000 cases WHO scientists looked at, only about 2% were in people younger than 19. The odds of developing COVID-19 increase with age, starting at age 60. It's especially lethal for people over 80. 

“This seems to be a disease that affects adults and most seriously older adults,” she said. “Starting at age 60, there is an increasing risk of disease and the risk increases with age.” 

People with diabetes, heart disease, lung disease and other serious underlying conditions are more ly to develop “serious outcomes, including death,” she said.

The CDC is recommending people with underlying conditions or who are over 60 to stock up on medications, household items and groceries to stay at home “for a period of time,” she said. The U.S.

government recommended travelers with underlying health conditions avoid taking any cruises anywhere in the world.

“We also recommend people at higher risk avoid non-essential travel, such as long plane trips,” she said. 

The CDC is recommending that people at higher risk avoid crowds, touching “high-touch” surfaces in public areas and close contact with people who are sick.

“These are the kind of recommendations that I've made to my parents … other staff at CDC are doing the same,” she said. 

While the virus is slowing in China where it originated in December, it's picking up pace across other parts of the world. Italy has the most cases outside of China with more than 9,100 infections, followed by Korea and Iran, which each had more than 7,100 COVID-19 cases as of Monday afternoon, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

In the U.S., cases erupted over the last week to more than 600 infected and 22 killed, according to John Hopkins University. Almost half of the more than 600 cases in the U.S. are in Washington state and California, with 19 deaths across the U.S.California, Washington and New York, although the virus has now spread to more than 30 states across the U.S. 

“During an outbreak with a new virus there is a lot of uncertainty. Our guidelines and recommendations are ly to be interim and subject to change as we learn more,” she said. In South Korea, no one under the age of 30 has died and in Japan, no one under 50 has died, she said. “Data from these countries help us understand the potential risk in the U.S.” 

“,”author”:”Dawn Kopecki,Noah Higgins-Dunn,Hannah Miller”,”date_published”:”2020-03-09T22:15:04.000Z”,”lead_image_url”:”https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/104237216-RTSNYTA.jpg?v=1529452209″,”dek”:null,”next_page_url”:null,”url”:”https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/09/many-americans-will-be-exposed-to-coronavirus-through-2021-cdc-says.html”,”domain”:”www.cnbc.com”,”excerpt”:”The CDC recommends that people over 60 and anyone with chronic medical conditions stock up on goods and buckle down for a lengthy stay home.”,”word_count”:634,”direction”:”ltr”,”total_pages”:1,”rendered_pages”:1}

Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/09/many-americans-will-be-exposed-to-coronavirus-through-2021-cdc-says.html

Charles Odonkor, MD, MA

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

As a physiatrist (a doctor who practices physical medicine and rehabilitation), Charles Odonkor, MD, is used to explaining his medical specialty.

“As humans, we evolved to be creatures of movement—you stop moving, you get sick. And sometimes chronic illness or pain will stop you in your tracks. That’s where a physiatrist steps in,” Dr. Odonkor says. “I use my toolbox, which includes medications, exercises, physical modalities, or interventions to help you get back to moving again and doing what you enjoy.”

Physiatry, he explains, goes beyond thinking about the body as just parts to looking at how the nerves, bones, muscles, and tendons are connected, with each one impacting function and movement.

As someone who enjoys solving puzzles, he says, “I love to figure out how all the pieces fit together so I can come up with the right treatment plan to help my patients succeed with their health goals.

”  

Dr. Odonkor completed a fellowship in pain medicine at Harvard Medical School and a physiatry residency and patient safety and health systems design fellowship at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

As an alumnus of Yale School of Medicine, he is excited to return to Yale to bring his expertise in advanced pain intervention techniques, regenerative medicine and neuromodulation to alleviate chronic pain.

Dr. Odonkor is passionate about providing exceptional patient care experience and designing value care processes that promote comprehensive functional restoration.

He says that in tackling challenging conditions complex regional pain syndrome, lumbar stenosis, and hip, spine, and joint pain, “one of the things I enjoy most is forming a therapeutic relationship with patients. That’s where the healing starts.”

“To me, pain is a big black box. We are in the 21st century and there still is so much we don’t know about it,” he adds.

His research interests include wearable devices that involve biosensors that, for a patient with a foot injury, for example, track changes in range of motion, gait speed, physical activity, and other measures of function.

Dr. Odonkor is an assistant professor of orthopedics and rehabilitation at Yale School of Medicine.

  • Yale School of Medicine (2013)
  • Washington University in St. Louis, Developmental, Cell and Molecular Biology (2008)
  • Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Postdoctoral Research FellowStanford University, Wearable Health Lab
  • North American Neuromodulation SocietyLas Vegas, United States 202023rd Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV
  • 11th Congress of the European Pain Federation
  • Annual Meeting, American Academy of Pain MedicineDenver, United States 2019
  • Annual Assembly of the American Academy of Physical Medicine & RehabilitationSan Antonio, United States 2018
  • Orlando, United States 2018
  • Research symposium at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Academic PhysiatristsAtlanta, United States 2018
  • 16th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain MedicineLake Buena Vista, United States 2017
  • Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationDenver, United States 2017
  • Annual Meeting of the Spine Intervention SocietySan Francisco, United States 2017
  • Annual Meeting of the Association of Academic PhysiatristsLas Vegas, United States 2017
  • Annual Assembly of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationNew Orleans, United States 2016
  • 1st Annual Excellence in Diversity SymposiumBaltimore, United States 2016
  • 16th World Congress on Pain, the International Association for the Study of Pain
  • Annual Meeting of the American College of Medical QualityWashington, United States 2016
  • Sacramento, United States 2016
  • 92nd Annual Conference, American Congress of Rehabilitation MedicineDallas, United States 2015
  • Paul S. Lietman Global Health Travel FellowshipKumasi, Ghana (2015-2017)
  • 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, American Pain SocietyPalm Springs, United States 2015
  • Showa University School of Medicine Invited LectureshipShinagawa City, Japan 2015
  • Fujita Health University Presidential Fellowship for Rehabilitation Research
  • International Forum on Patient Safety and QualityLondon, United Kingdom 2013
  • Harvard Medical School, New England Science SymposiumBoston, United States 2013
  • Annual Meeting of the American College of Medical QualityPhoenix, United States 2013

Source: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/charles_odonkor/

Johns Hopkins Medicine and Walgreens Expand Collaboration to Bring First-of-its-Kind Walgreens to Johns Hopkins Medical Campus

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

June 27, 2013 08:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

DEERFIELD, Ill.

& BALTIMORE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–A new Walgreens store is being developed adjacent to the Johns Hopkins East Baltimore medical campus, which will offer new health and wellness programs and services for students and staff, as well as residents of the surrounding community.

The store marks a significant expansion of a unique collaboration between Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) and Walgreens (NYSE: WAG) (Nasdaq: WAG) first announced in May 2011, to collaborate and explore the development of new models for improving overall patient care.

The new Walgreens “Well Experience” store will offer health services, as well as healthy food options and a full selection of other daily living products.

In addition to its pharmacy, the store will bring other health care resources to the community with a new Take Care Clinic, staffed by board-certified nurse practitioners, marking the first Walgreens in-store retail clinic in the state of Maryland.

The store will be located at Science and Technology Park adjacent to the Johns Hopkins medical campus. The park is being developed by Forest City – New East Baltimore Partnership. Construction is expected to begin in July with the planned opening in late November.

“This is a significant next step in our relationship, leveraging the clinical expertise of Johns Hopkins Medicine and Walgreens expansive health care resources to create a retail hub for community-based care,” said Kermit Crawford, Walgreens president of pharmacy, health and wellness.

“Our pharmacy and Take Care Clinic will provide an environment for collaborative health care innovation, while also providing greater access to health care services for the Johns Hopkins community, students, employees and patients.

This new venture is another way in which we’re advancing community pharmacy to help more people get, stay and live well.”

With an emphasis on population health and wellness, the Walgreens store plans to introduce a number of programs in collaboration with Johns Hopkins Medicine faculty, including:

  • Student health services – clinical, pharmacy and retail products and services
  • Take Care Clinic – with extended evening and weekend hours, providing assessment, treatment and management of certain chronic conditions, as well as care for minor illness and injuries, immunizations, preventive health screenings/counseling and more
  • Chronic disease education and awareness programs
  • Smoking cessation programs
  • HIV testing – part of a Walgreens program supporting people living with HIV/AIDS, offering accessible health and wellness guidance and testing programs/services
  • Immunizations, including those for travel

Patricia M.C. Brown, JD, president of Johns Hopkins HealthCare, says, “These programs will provide a novel approach to population health and medical services. They will benefit not only Johns Hopkins employees and the surrounding community, but also form the level of health care collaboration that could serve as a national model.”

The Walgreens “Well Experience” retail concept supports the company’s efforts to transform the role of community pharmacy and re-engineer health care delivery in the U.S.

, while also providing a more personalized health care experience.

With pharmacists out from behind the counter and positioned in front of the pharmacy, they are more accessible to customers and patients to provide one-on-one consultations, address medication questions and concerns and more.

According to Paul Rothman, MD, dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, “Our collaboration with Walgreens creates the opportunity to offer innovative, locally-based health care services while further weaving Johns Hopkins Medicine into the fabric of East Baltimore. We will also use the lessons learned from this collaboration beyond our community, as Johns Hopkins Medicine continues to set the standard for medical education, research and patient care on a national scale and around the world.”

Johns Hopkins physicians will collaborate with nurse practitioners at the Take Care Clinic, and will be available during clinic hours for consultation. Johns Hopkins also has a collaborative practice agreement at a Take Care Clinic in Washington, D.C.

“We have been working with Walgreens for more than a year to develop collaborative approaches to population-based research which utilize the strengths of both organizations to improve health outcomes for patients,” says Jeanne M.

Clark, MD, interim director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“The opening of the new Walgreens store increases our potential to advance population health in the community and across the country and is a mechanism to expand our relationship with Walgreens.”

Take Care Clinics are open seven days a week, with extended evening and weekend hours, and offer walk-in availability as well as same-day online appointment scheduling. The clinics are located in 20 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. are staffed by board-certified nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

“We’re proud to expand our relationship with Johns Hopkins to coordinate care at our first Take Care Clinic in Maryland,” said Alan E. London, M.D., chief medical officer, Take Care Clinics. “Through clinical collaborations, we’re able to facilitate more coordinated health care services, which are key to improving patient care and access.”

About Walgreens

As the nation's largest drugstore chain with fiscal 2012 sales of $72 billion, Walgreens (www.walgreens.com) vision is to become America’s first choice for health and daily living.

Each day, Walgreens provides more than 6 million customers the most convenient, multichannel access to consumer goods and services and trusted, cost-effective pharmacy, health and wellness services and advice in communities across America.

Walgreens scope of pharmacy services includes retail, specialty, infusion, medical facility and mail service, along with respiratory services. These services improve health outcomes and lower costs for payers including employers, managed care organizations, health systems, pharmacy benefit managers and the public sector.

The company operates 8,096 drugstores in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Take Care Health Systems is a Walgreens subsidiary that is the largest and most comprehensive manager of worksite health and wellness centers and in-store convenient care clinics, with more than 700 locations throughout the country.

About Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM), headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, is a $6.7 billion integrated global health enterprise and one of the leading health care systems in the United States.

JHM unites physicians and scientists of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with the organizations, health professionals and facilities of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System. JHM's mission is to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and clinical care.

Diverse and inclusive, JHM educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public; conducts biomedical research; and provides patient-centered medicine to prevent, diagnose and treat human illness.

JHM operates six academic and community hospitals, four suburban health care and surgery centers, more than 38 primary health care outpatient sites and other businesses that care for national and international patients and activities. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, opened in 1889, was ranked number one in the nation for 21 years by U.S. News & World Report.

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20130627005060/en/Johns-Hopkins-Medicine-Walgreens-Expand-Collaboration-Bring

The Johns Hopkins Hospital Reviews

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

SortPopularHighest RatingLowest RatingMost RecentOldest First

  • “great benefits package and teaching facility” (in 29 reviews)
  • “Name recognition in working for Hopkins, fast paced work environment, great benefits” (in 17 reviews)
  • “Low pay rate compared to other hospitals” (in 16 reviews)
  • “The city of Baltimore isn’t my favorite place, mostly because of safety” (in 10 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Great Benefits and great career opportunities

    Cons

    Pay is okay but it's hard to get paid what you really worth

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-09-07

  2. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    opinion is valued among superiors

    Cons

    lower salary then area hospitals

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-09-20

  3. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    JHH offers decent benefits, tuition reimbursement, health insurance and long time employees have pensions

    Cons

    Large organization…difficult to get salary increases, promotions. Have to leave and return to be promoted. Salaries are on the low end.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-05-16

  4. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    403 (B), Dental, Vision, etc.

    Cons

    Lack of communication and a harsh culture.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-04-28

  5. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    its a great place to learn !

    Cons

    Because they can replace you at any time i feel there arent enough incentives to stay… raises are pathetic

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-04-16

  6. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Lots of learning and advancement opportunities but it's highly dependent on which unit you work at. There's an education benefit if you have college-aged children.

    Cons

    Surrounding area is not safe especially for staff leaving during late hours (11p, 1a, etc). It's also not a union hospital so the pay is lower compared to other hospitals in the same area. The on-call requirement per schedule is also dependent on the unit, can vary from 12 to 24 hrs every 6 weeks. Benefits have gotten significantly less over the years.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-02-18

  7. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time

    Pros

    The best insurance in the class.

    Cons

    Everything except for the insurance.

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-03-23

  8. I worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Hopkins has plenty of them! very challenging, but fulfilling place to work

    Cons

    pay is not equal to other hospitals in area

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-01-13

  9. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Teaching hospital, great health and education benefits.

    Cons

    No free parking, lack of team efforts in improving and providing quality patient care

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2020-01-13

  10. I have been working at The Johns Hopkins Hospital full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Ability to move up the clinical ladder in some areas due to high turnover

    Cons

    Chronic understaffing, constant budget cuts, lack of accountability

    Flag as InappropriateFlag as InappropriateThe Johns Hopkins Hospital2019-12-27

See All PhotosSee All

Source: https://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/The-Johns-Hopkins-Hospital-Reviews-E121774.htm

Baltimore Airport (BWI) to Johns Hopkins Hospital – 8 ways to travel

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

Select an option below to see step-by-step directions and to compare ticket prices and travel times in Rome2rio's travel planner.

There is widespread community transmission in United States.

Travel restrictions may apply and transportation services are subject to change.

For travel planning advice, please refer to our Rome2rio Coronavirus information page .
For the latest travel status, we recommend checking the official page for United States.

Data sourced from: CDC, ACAPS

  • Distance: 14.6 km
  • Duration: 1h

You can take a bus from Baltimore Airport (BWI) to Johns Hopkins Hospital via Um Medical Center On-Street Stop, PRATT ST & GREENE ST eb, and BROADWAY & MONUMENT ST nb in around 1h 1m.

Rome2rio's Travel Guide series provide vital information for the global traveller. Read our range of informative guides on popular transport routes and companies – including How do I get from Sydney to Melbourne, Getting around the Cyclades and Travelling to and around Russia for the 2018 FIFA World Cup – to help you get the most your next trip.

Baltimore is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. – Wikipedia

Things to do in Baltimore

  • The Inner Harbor is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, and landmark of the city of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. It was described by the Urban Land Institute in 2009 as “the model for post-industrial waterfront redevelopment around the world.” The Inner Harbor is located at the mouth of Jones Falls, creating the wide and short northwest branch of the Patapsco River. The district includes any water west of a line drawn between the foot of President Street and the American Visionary Art Museum.
  • The Walters Art Museum, located in Mount Vernon-Belvedere, Baltimore, Maryland, is a public art museum founded and opened in 1934. It holds collections established during the mid-19th century. The Museum's collection was amassed substantially by major American art and sculpture collectors, a father and son: William Thompson Walters, (1819–1894), who began serious collecting when he moved to Paris as a nominal Southern/Confederate sympathizer at the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861; and Henry Walters (1848–1931), who refined the collection and made arrangements for the construction of a later landmark building to rehouse it. After allowing the Baltimore public to occasionally view his father's and his growing added collections at his West Mount Vernon Place townhouse/mansion during the late 1800s, he arranged for an elaborate stone palazzo-styled structure built for that purpose in 1905–1909. Located across the back alley, a block south of the Walters mansion on West Monument Street/Mount Vernon Place, on the northwest corner of North Charles Street at West Centre Street.
  • Oriole Park at Camden Yards, often referred to simply as Camden Yards or Oriole Park, is a Major League Baseball (MLB) ballpark located in Baltimore, Maryland. Home to the Baltimore Orioles, it is the first of the “retro” major league ballparks constructed during the 1990s and early 2000s, and remains one of the most highly praised. It was completed in 1992 to replace Memorial Stadium.
  • Fell's Point is a historic waterfront neighborhood in the southeastern area of the City of Baltimore, Maryland. It was established around 1763 and is located along the north shore of the Baltimore Harbor and the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River. The area features many shops, including antique stores, restaurants, coffee bars, music stores, a municipal markethouse with individual stalls, and over 120 pubs. Located just east of the famous “Inner Harbor” (formerly referred to as “The Basin”) adjacent to Baltimore's downtown central business district and the Jones Falls stream (which splits the city, running from northern Baltimore County), Fell's Point has a maritime past and the air of a seafaring town. It also has the greatest concentration of drinking establishments and restaurants in the city.

Places to stay in Baltimore

  • 8.8 Fabulous
  • 8.8 Fabulous
  • 9.2 Superb
  • 9 Fabulous

Rome2rio makes travelling from Baltimore Airport (BWI) to Johns Hopkins Hospital easy.

Rome2rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world. Find all the transport options for your trip from Baltimore Airport (BWI) to Johns Hopkins Hospital right here.

Rome2rio displays up to date schedules, route maps, journey times and estimated fares from relevant transport operators, ensuring you can make an informed decision about which option will suit you best.

Rome2rio also offers online bookings for selected operators, making reservations easy and straightforward.

Source: https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Baltimore-Airport-BWI/Johns-Hopkins-Hospital

Paul S. Lietman Global Travel Grant for Residents & Fellows

Traveling with Chronic Conditions | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health (CGH), with the support of the Gilead Foundation and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and the Graduate Medical Education (GME) program, is able to support travel grants for residents and fellows to facilitate rotations overseas in low- and middle-income countries. Applications will be reviewed by a committee formed by the CGH.

Residents & Fellows selected for a grant that have also been approved by their residency director and the Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education will be awarded a grant of $3,500 – $5,000 to support travel- and other placement-related costs. You can read more about the impact of our program here.

ANNOUNCEMENT

The CGH will continue its application and awards processes for the Lietman award in Spring 2020, due at 11:59 p.m. on May 21.

However absolutely no funding will be released until University policy changes regarding COVID19 and international travel.

We will also be carefully reviewing awards the countries of travel – some awards will be released on a case by case basis depending on current travel restrictions.

Eligibility

The fellowship is open to residents and fellows in a GME program sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine or the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Residents and Fellows who will be completing their training prior to their travel are not eligible to apply. 

Applicants must have an MD or DO to apply, and be currently enrolled in a program that is predominantly clinically-focused, i.e. not solely research.

All applicants must apply for travel to low and middle-income countries.

If you are unsure if your country qualifies or have questions about your program's eligibility, contact the Student Program Coordinator (lietmanfellow@jhu.edu).

Other Requirements

Residents & Fellows selected for this placement will be expected to:

See Call for Applications for complete list of requirements.

*For the pre-departure travel preparation course, if using DIH's  CoursePlus, you will need to create a free account. If completing requirements via Coursera, you will need to pay for the certificate AND complete the “Honors” assignment. If you are unsure which one to take, contact the program coordinator.

Notices to Residents & Fellows:

  • The process for the travel grants is competitive, so applicants are not guaranteed a grant.
  • Applicants may NOT submit for travel already underway at the time of application or travel already completed unless they are submitting for an extension.
  • Applicants are also advised that, depending upon the placement, the award from the Center for Global Health may not cover the entire cost of their travel and subsistence. In these instances, the awardee will be required to use their own resources to meet their costs.
  • International students: Please be advised that the $3,500 – $5,000 award may be taxable and a portion of the award could be withheld upon disbursement. 

To Apply

Download the forms below and after completion, upload the following materials electronically to Lietman Spring 2020 by the deadline.

Application Deadline: Spring 2020 is Thursday, May 21, 2020 at 11:59pm EST.

>> Global Health Travel Grants for Housestaff Call for Applications

Upcoming Cycle Timelines (all due dates close at 11:59pm EST)

Spring 2020 Extended Due date May 21, 2020
Expected Spring 2020 Announcement Date  June 22-26, 2020

​Accepted Students

To understand the specifics of your award please consult our funding page.

For more information & queries contact:

Lillian JamesProgram Coordinator

Tel: 410-955-6032

Email: lietmanfellow@jhu.edu

Photo credits: Suzanne Simkovich, Lietman Fall 2017, Peru: “A community health fair in a community in rural Peru”

Source: http://hopkinsglobalhealth.org/funding-opportunities/student-and-trainee-grants/housestaff-grant/